UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Xiaozhong Wen UB Profile
Pediatrics
Associate Professor
Specialty/Research Focus: Pediatrics; Public Health and General Preventive Medicine; Behavioral Medicine
University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Division of Behavioral Medicine
G56 Farber Hall, 3435 Main Street
Buffalo NY 14214
716-829-6811
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Lu Ma, Yixin Ding, Xiaozhong Wen, Liwang Gao, Li Zhao, Bo Xue, Yun Wang, Youfa Wang
PubMedId: 33427145
1: Public health nutrition, 2021
Authors: Amanda M Palmer, Alana M Rojewski, Li-Shiun Chen, Lisa M Fucito, Panagis Galiatsatos, Hasmeena Kathuria, Stephanie R Land, Glen D Morgan, Alex T Ramsey, Kimber P Richter, Xiaozhong Wen, Benjamin A Toll
PubMedId: 33259805
1: Chest, 2020
Authors: Baibing Mi, Xiaozhong Wen, Shanshan Li, Danmeng Liu, Fangliang Lei, Xin Liu, Duolao Wang, Xuelan Li, Abdal Aziz T Shittu, Shaonong Dang, Hong Yan
PubMedId: 32141968
1: Journal of hypertension, 2020
Authors: Zhongzheng Niu, Karen Li, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen
PubMedId: 31630890
1: The Journal of pediatrics, vol. 215, 2019
Authors: Baibing Mi, Xiaozhong Wen, Shanshan Li, Danmeng Liu, Fangliang Lei, Ruru Liu, Yuan Shen, Yue Chen, Lingxia Zeng, Xin Liu, Shaonong Dang, Hong Yan
PubMedId: 31056148
1: Pregnancy hypertension, vol. 16, 2018
Authors: Lihua Huang, Yijuan Luo, Xiaozhong Wen, Yan-Hui He, Peng Ding, Chuanbo Xie, Tao Liu, Shi-Xin Yuan, De-Qin Jia, Wei-Qing Chen
PubMedId: 29338478
1: The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, vol. 32, 2018
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Xiaozhong Wen
PubMedId: 29356809
1: JAMA pediatrics, vol. 172, 2018
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Rina D Eiden, Faye E Justicia-Linde, Youfa Wang, Stephen T Higgins, Nicolas Thor, Arsalan Haghdel, Ariel R Peters, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 29648615
Journal-article: Translational Behavioral Medicine, 2018
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Rina D Eiden, Faye E Justicia-Linde, Youfa Wang, Stephen T Higgins, Kai Ling Kong, Abdal Aziz T Shittu, Jacob M Perkins, Priscilla Esadah, Taylor E Mautner, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 30518822
1: International journal of obesity (2005), vol. 43, 2018
Authors: Zhongzheng Niu, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen, Fuying Tian, Peng Ding, Yanhui He, Lijun Fan, Shixin Yuan, Deqin Jia, Wei-Qing Chen
Journal-article: Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 27, pp. 533-534, 2017
Authors: Danielle S. Molnar, Diana Rancourt, Robert Schlauch, Xiaozhong Wen, Marilyn A. Huestis, Rina D. Eiden
PubMedId: 28169405
Journal-article: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, vol. 42, pp. 679-688, 2017
Authors: Zhongzheng Niu, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen, Fuying Tian, Peng Ding, Yanhui He, Lijun Fan, Shixin Yuan, Deqin Jia, Wei-Qing Chen
PubMedId: 28347163
1: The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians, vol. 31, 2017
Authors: Jungwon Min, Xiaozhong Wen, Hong Xue, Youfa Wang
PubMedId: 29907845
1: International journal of obesity (2005), vol. 42, 2017
Authors: Fu-Ying Tian, Marie-France Hivert, Xiaozhong Wen, Chuanbo Xie, Zhongzheng Niu, Lijun Fan, Matthew W Gillman, Wei-Qing Chen
PubMedId: 28454697
1: Placenta, vol. 52, 2016
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Stephen T. Higgins, Chuanbo Xie, Leonard H. Epstein
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2016
Authors: Xiuhong Li, Rina D Eiden, Leonard H Epstein, Edmond D Shenassa, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen
Abstract: It remains unclear why substantial variations in neurodevelopmental outcomes exist within small-for-gestational-age (SGA) children. We prospectively compared 5-y neurodevelopmental outcomes across SGA etiological subgroups. Children born SGA (N = 1050) from U.S. Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007) was divided into etiological subgroups by each of 7 well-established prenatal risk factors. We fit linear regression models to compare 5-y reading, math, gross motor and fine motor scores across SGA subgroups, adjusting for socio-demographic confounders. Compared to singleton SGA subgroup, multiple-birth SGA subgroup had lower mean reading (adjusted mean difference, -4.08 [95% confidence interval, -6.10, -2.06]) and math (-2.22 [-3.61, -0.84]) scores. These disadvantages in reading and math existed only among multiple-birth SGA subgroup without ovulation stimulation (reading, -4.50 [-6.64, -2.36]; math, -2.91 [-4.37, -1.44]), but not among those with ovulation stimulation (reading, -2.33 [-6.24, 1.57]; math 0.63 [-1.86, 3.12]). Compared to singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain, singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) had lower mean reading (-4.81 [-8.50, -1.12]) and math (-2.95 [-5.51, -0.38]) scores. These differences were not mediated by Apgar score. Multiple-birth SGA subgroups (vs. singleton SGA) or singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of smoking and inadequate GWG (vs. singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain) have poorer cognitive development up to 5 y.
PubMedId: 27501456
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 11, 2016
Authors: Xiuhong Li, Rina D Eiden, Leonard H Epstein, Edmond D Shenassa, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen
Keywords: Small-for-gestational-age appropriate-for-gestational-age children cognition parenting psychomotor
Abstract: To examine whether different dimensions of parenting at different ages help small-for-gestational-age (SGA) children 'catch-up' the normal children in cognition and psychomotor. We analyzed data of 800 children born SGA and 3,000 children born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth cohort. The Two Bag Task was used to measure 2-year or 4-year parenting dimensions. Children's reading, math, gross motor, and fine motor scores were assessed at 5years. Multivariable linear regression models were fitted to test the interactions between SGA and 2-year or 4-year parenting dimensions on 5-year cognitive and psychomotor outcomes (dependent variables). There were significant interactions between SGA and early parenting on 5-year reading, math, and fine motor scores. The gap between SGA and AGA children in 5-year fine motor score was attenuated to null [-0.25 (95% confidence interval, -0.41, -0.09) vs. 0.03 (-0.13, 0.20)] when 2-year parental sensitivity score increased from 1 standard deviation (SD) below mean (Mean-SD) to 1 SD above mean (Mean+SD). The gap between SGA and AGA children in 5-year fine motor [-0.28 (-0.44, -0.13) vs. 0.06 (-0.09, 0.22)] and math [-1.32 (-2.27, -0.37) vs. 0.20 (-0.77, 1.17)] scores was also attenuated to null when 4-year parental emotional support score increased from Mean-SD to Mean+SD. In contrast, the gap between SGA and AGA children in 5-year reading score increased from 0.49 (-0.90, 1.88) to -1.31 (-2.55, -0.07) when 4-year parental intrusiveness score increased from Mean-SD to Mean+SD. Similarly, the gap between SGA and AGA children in fine motor score increased with 4-year parental negative regard from 0.02 (-0.14, 0.18) to -0.23 (-0.38, -0.08). Early high-quality parenting may buffer some adversity in long-termreading, math, and fine motor skills related to SGA birth, whereas low-quality parenting can amplify the adversity.
PubMedId: 27678110
Journal-article: Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines, vol. 58, 2016
Authors: Kai Ling Kong, Matthew W Gillman, Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman, Xiaozhong Wen
Keywords: Early consumption Early liking Fruit and vegetable consumption Maternal consumption
Abstract: Previous studies have shown that early liking, early consumption, and maternal consumption of fruits and vegetables (F&V) each predict children's F&V consumption, but no one has examined the independent contributions of these three correlated factors. We aim to examine the extent to which each of these 3 factors is associated with F&V consumption in mid-childhood after accounting for the other 2 in the analysis. We analyzed data from 901 mother-child dyads from Project Viva, a prospective pre-birth cohort study. Mothers reported their child's early liking and consumption of F&V at age 2 years and later consumption at mid-childhood (median age 7.7 years). They also reported their own consumption of F&V at 6 months postpartum. We used multivariable linear regression models to examine the independent associations of these 3 factors with mid-childhood consumption, adjusting for socio-demographic, pregnancy, and child confounders. At 2 years, 53% of the mothers strongly agreed that their child liked fruit and 25% strongly agreed that their child liked vegetables. F&V consumption was 2.5 (1.3) and 1.8 (1.1) times/d at age 2y and 1.5 (1.1) and 1.3 (0.8) times/d in mid-childhood. Maternal F&V consumption was 1.4 (1.1) and 1.5 (1.0) times/d, respectively. Children's early consumption played the most predominant role. For every 1 time/d increment in children's early consumption of F&V, mid-childhood consumption was higher by 0.25 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19, 0.30) times/d for fruits and 0.21 (95% CI: 0.16, 0.26) times/d for vegetables, adjusted for confounders plus the other 2 exposures. In conclusion, children's early F&V consumption has the most significant influence on children's later consumption.
PubMedId: 27238899
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 105, 2015
Authors: Edmond D Shenassa, Xiaozhong Wen, Susan Braid
Keywords: breastfeeding infancy maternal smoking rapid weight gain weight
Abstract: Although the immutable benefits of breastfeeding are well documented, information on the potential consequences of exposure to tobacco metabolites specifically via breastfeeding is sparse. The aim was to conduct the first study of the association between exposure to tobacco metabolites specifically through breastfeeding and infant weight gain. We used historical data from the US Collaborative Perinatal Project. Mothers were classified as nonsmokers, light smokers (1-19 cigarettes/day), and heavy (20+ cigarettes/day) smokers. In-hospital feeding type was observed during a nursery stay after delivery. We conducted stratified analyses among average-for-gestational-age (AGA; N = 23571) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA; N = 2552) infants. We isolated the effect of exposure to tobacco metabolites specifically through breastfeeding. Overall, maternal smoking was associated with change in weight-for-length z-score in a dose-response manner. Change in weight z-score was most pronounced among SGA infants of heavy smokers (breastfed: 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12-0.94; formula fed: 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03-0.30). Exposure to tobacco metabolites specifically through breastfeeding was not associated with additional weight gain among AGA infants. Among the much smaller sample of SGA infants, exposure specifically through breastfeeding was associated with marginally significant additional weight gain (0.46; 95% CI, 0.00-0.91) among infants of heavy smokers. Our findings are in accord with recommendations by health agencies for smokers to breastfeed. However, SGA infants exposed to tobacco metabolites via breastfeeding by heavy smokers appear to gain weight more rapidly than other infants. Practical implications of our findings are discussed.
PubMedId: 26644421
Journal-article: Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, vol. 32, 2015
Authors: Ying Xu, Juan Qi, Yi Yang, Xiaozhong Wen
Keywords: Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) College students Depressive symptoms Early adulthood Lifestyles
Abstract: It is well known that some lifestyle factors are related to depression, but their cumulative contribution to the depression remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the importance of multiple lifestyle factors in contributing to depressive symptoms among Chinese college students. Between September and December in 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 1907 Chinese college students from Guangzhou, Southern China. College students completed self-administered questionnaires and reported their lifestyle factors including sleep quality and duration, Internet use, smoking, drinking, exercise, outdoor activity or sunlight exposure, and eating breakfast. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms were defined as the CES-D score 16. Among all the students, 29.7% reported mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms. Higher quality and longer duration of sleep, more exercises, more outdoor activities or sunlight exposures, and eating breakfast daily were associated with a lower CES-D score, which could explain 11.3% of variance of the CES-D score, after adjusting for socio-demographics, family history, interpersonal relationship, and academic characteristics using hierarchical multivariable linear regression. These associations were comparable between males and females. The protective role of healthy lifestyles should be considered in intervention programs for improving mental health among college students.
PubMedId: 27565695
Journal-article: Psychiatry research, vol. 245, 2015
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Stephen T Higgins, Chuanbo Xie, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Financial incentives are effective for smoking cessation during pregnancy. Public opinion is important for successful dissemination of this approach from research into clinical practice. We developed a brief information-based intervention to improve public acceptability. We recruited 166 adult participants (54.2% females [6.7% pregnant], 25.3% smokers, mean age 32.4 years [SD, 9.9]) currently living the United States from Amazon Mechanical Turk. They were randomized to either intervention (N = 84) or control (N = 82). The control group read educational materials on car safety for pregnant women and young children. The intervention group read educational materials on the rationale behind using financial incentives for smoking cessation during pregnancy. Key outcomes were 11 opinion items regarding whether using financial incentives to help pregnant smokers to quit is a good idea; its effectiveness, fairness, cost, health benefits, and saved healthcare cost; and pregnant women's responsibility and difficulty of quitting smoking. Intervention and control groups had similar pretest opinion on using financial incentives for smoking cessation during pregnancy. All 11 mean opinion scores significantly increased in the intervention group, but remained stable in the control group. After the intervention, 27.7% more of participants (from 62.6% to 90.3%; P value < .001) in the intervention group and only 4.8% more (from 64.6% to 69.4%; P value = .557) in the control group agreed that "Paying pregnant women who smoke to quit smoking is a good idea" (interaction P value = .015). Our low-cost information-based intervention has the potential to improve public acceptability of this efficacious approach to promoting smoking cessation during pregnancy. In this sample of educated young adults, our low-cost information-based intervention substantially improved their acceptability of using financial incentives for smoking cessation during pregnancy. Our intervention can be used to gain public support before implementing this approach as a policy in the general population. One potential concern that needs to be further addressed by future intervention is unfairness of this smoking cessation approach to pregnant nonsmokers.
PubMedId: 26385928
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 18, 2015
Authors: Zhongzheng Niu, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen, Fuying Tian, Shixin Yuan, Deqin Jia, Wei-Qing Chen
Abstract: It is well documented that maternal exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) during pregnancy causes low birth weight (LBW), but its mechanism remains unknown. This study explored the potential pathways. We enrolled 195 pregnant women who delivered full-term LBW newborns, and 195 who delivered full-term normal birth weight newborns as the controls. After controlling for maternal age, education level, family income, pre-pregnant body mass index, newborn gender and gestational age, logistic regression analysis revealed that LBW was significantly and positively associated with maternal exposure to SHS during pregnancy, lower placental weight, TNF- and IL-1, and that SHS exposure was significantly associated with lower placental weight, TNF- and IL-1. Structural equation modelling identified two plausible pathways by which maternal exposure to SHS during pregnancy might cause LBW. First, SHS exposure induced the elevation of TNF-, which might directly increase the risk of LBW by transmission across the placenta. Second, SHS exposure first increased maternal secretion of IL-1 and TNF-, which then triggered the secretion of VCAM-1; both TNF- and VCAM-1 were significantly associated with lower placental weight, thus increasing the risk of LBW. In conclusion, maternal exposure to SHS during pregnancy may lead to LBW through the potential pathways of maternal inflammation and lower placental weight.
PubMedId: 27126191
Journal-article: Scientific reports, vol. 6, 2015
Authors: Chuanbo Xie, Youfa Wang, Xiuhong Li, Xiaozhong Wen
Abstract: To evaluate whether large for gestational age (LGA) etiological subgroups have differential growth trajectories during early childhood. Approximately 10,700 infants and their parents were included in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort in 2001-2002. Research staff collected data in 5 waves when participating children were approximately 9 months and 2, 4, 5, and 6 years of age. We analyzed 2950 LGA and appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) children with at least 1 growth outcome at ages 9 months, 2 years, and 4 years. We divided 600 LGA newborns into 8 subgroups by maternal overweight or obesity before pregnancy (OW/OB), diabetes mellitus (DM), and excessive gestational weight gain (ExGWG). We used mixed effect regression models to compare trajectories of height (length)-for-age or body mass index (BMI) z scores across LGA subgroups and the AGA reference group. Relative to the reference group, the LGA subgroup with maternal OW/OB and DM but normal gestational weight gain had "continuous high rising" BMI z-score trajectory from 9 months to 4 years and the greatest mean z score at 4 years (2.14 [95% CI, 1.29, 2.98]). The LGA subgroup free of maternal OW/OB, DM, or ExGWG had a similar BMI z-score trajectory ("stable low") from 9 months to 4 years and a similar 4-years mean z score (0.97 [95% CI, 0.75, 1.18] vs 0.72 [95% CI, 0.67, 0.78]) relative to the AGA reference group. The LGA subgroup with co-occurrence of maternal OW/OB and DM had the greatest 4-year BMI, whereas the LGA subgroup free of maternal OW/OB, DM, or ExGWG were tall but lean ("a healthy phenotype").
PubMedId: 26687713
Journal-article: The Journal of pediatrics, vol. 170, 2015
Authors: Chuanbo Xie, Leonard H Epstein, Rina D Eiden, Edmond D Shenassa, Xiuhong Li, Yan Liao, Xiaozhong Wen
Abstract: To compare risk of stunting at 5 years across etiological subgroups of small for gestational age (SGA) newborns. We analyzed data of a subsample (N = 1100) of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort. We defined SGA as birth weight <10th percentile, then classified subjects into etiological subgroups by each of 8 risk factors (ie, maternal prepregnancy underweight, short stature, smoking during pregnancy, alcohol use during pregnancy, inadequate gestational weight gain [GWG], hypertension, genital herpes infection, and multiple births) or by cooccurrence of 2 often intertwined risk factors (smoking and inadequate GWG). We defined stunting as 5 years height-for-age z score below -2. We fitted logistic regression models to test whether the risk of stunting differed across SGA subgroups, adjusting for confounders. SGA subgroup with maternal short stature (odds ratio [OR] = 3.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.16-6.96) or inadequate GWG (OR = 2.18; 95% CI = 1.23-3.84) had higher risk of stunting at 5 years, compared with the SGA subgroup without the corresponding risk factor. SGA newborns with both maternal smoking and inadequate GWG during pregnancy had much higher risk of stunting at 5 years (OR = 3.10; 95% CI = 1.21-7.91), compared with SGA newborns without any of these 2 SGA risk factors. Etiological subgroups of SGA differed in risk of stunting at 5 years. SGA newborns of inadequate GWG mothers who smoke and SGA newborns of short mothers were at particularly high risk of stunting.
PubMedId: 26772663
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 137, 2015
Authors: Xiaodong Wen, Lacy Reynolds, Rohit S Mulik, Soo Young Kim, Tim Van Treuren, Liem H Nguyen, Hao Zhu, Ian R Corbin
Keywords: Lipid Peroxidation Liver Cancer Nanomedicine Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Abstract: Dietary intake of the natural omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been implicated in protecting patients with viral hepatitis B or C from developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Little is known about the effects of DHA on established solid tumors. Here we describe a low-density lipoprotein-based nanoparticle that acts as a transporter for unesterified DHA (LDL-DHA) and demonstrates selectivecytotoxicity toward HCC cells. We investigated the ability of LDL-DHA to reduce growth of orthotopic hepatomas in rats. AxC-Irish (ACI) rats were given intrahepatic injections of rat hepatoma cells (H4IIE); 24 tumor-bearing rats (mean tumor diameter, 1 cm) were subject to a single hepatic artery injection of LDL nanoparticles (2 mg/kg) loaded with DHA (LDL-DHA), triolein (LDL-TO), or sham surgery controls. Tumor growth was measured by magnetic resonance imaging and other methods; tumor, liver, and serum samples were collected and assessed by histochemical, immunofluorescence, biochemical, and immunoblot analyses. Three days after administration of LDL-TO or sham surgery, the control rats had large, highly vascularized tumors that contained proliferating cells. However, rats given LDL-DHA had smaller, pale tumors that were devoid of vascular supply and >80% of the tumor tissue was necrotic. Four to 6 days after injection of LDL-DHA, the tumors were 3-fold smaller than those of control rats. The liver tissue that surrounded the tumors showed no histologic or biochemical evidence of injury. Injection of LDL-DHA into the hepatic artery of rats selectively deregulated redox reactions in tumor tissues by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, depleting and oxidizing glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, and significantlydown-regulating the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-4. Remarkably, the redox balance in the surrounding liver was not disrupted. LDL-DHA nanoparticle selectively kills hepatoma cells and reduces growth of orthotopic liver tumors in rats. It induces tumor-specific necrosis by selectively disrupting redox balance within the cancer cell.
PubMedId: 26484708
Journal-article: Gastroenterology, vol. 150, 2015
Authors: K L Kong, M W Gillman, S L Rifas-Shiman, X Wen
Keywords: adiposity childhood obesity gestation leisure time physical activity
Abstract: Effects of maternal leisure time physical activity (LTPA) on paediatric obesity are unknown. The objective of this study was to examine associations of maternal LTPA with offspring overall and central adiposity in mid-childhood. We analysed data from 802 mother-child dyads from Project Viva, a prospective pre-birth cohort study. Women reported average weekly LTPA before and during mid-pregnancy. At age 7-10years, we measured fat, truncal fat and lean mass with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Using multivariable linear regression, we examined associations of maternal LTPA with offspring adiposity, adjusting for child age and sex, maternal race/ethnicity, education, age, pre-pregnancy body mass index, marital status and smoking status. Mean (standard deviation) of LTPA before and during mid-pregnancy were 9.5 (8.1) and 7.1 (7.0) hweek(-1) . At mean age 7.8 (0.8) years, childhood fat, truncal fat and lean mass indices were 4.3 (1.8), 1.4 (0.8) and 12.9 (1.4)kgm(-2) . We did not find that higher maternal LTPA was associated with lower child adiposity outcomes. For example, compared with 0-3hweek(-1) of LTPA during mid-pregnancy, children of mothers with +8hweek(-1) had fat mass index 0.07kgm(-2) (95% confidence interval: -0.22, 0.36). In analyses of within-person LTPA change from before to mid-pregnancy, compared with +2hweek(-1) decrease in LTPA, increased LTPA (2hweek(-1) ) was associated with a 0.09kgm(-2) fat mass index (-0.25, 0.43). Contrary to our hypothesis, higher LTPA before and during mid-pregnancy, and the change between them, were not associated with lower adiposity in mid-childhood.
PubMedId: 25854785
Journal-article: Pediatric obesity, vol. 11, 2014
Authors: Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen, Zhongzheng Niu, Peng Ding, Tao Liu, Yanhui He, Jianmiao Lin, Shixin Yuan, Xiaoling Guo, Deqin Jia, Weiqing Chen
Abstract: Risk of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth varied considerably in women exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) during pregnancy. We examined whether this variation was explained by mothers' one Phase I (CYP2A6*4, activation of tobacco toxics) and two Phase II (GSTM1 and GSTT1, detoxification) metabolic genotypes. We enrolled 468 Chinese pregnant women (115 delivering SGA and 353 delivering non-SGA newborns) shortly before delivery. SHS exposure during pregnancy was defined as self-reported daily exposure time being more than 0 minute. We fitted multivariable logistic regression models to examine whether CYP2A6*4, GSTM1, and GSTT1 gene polymorphsims and their combinations modified the association between SHS exposure and SGA. In the total sample, more mothers of SGA newborns were exposed to SHS during pregnancy than mothers of non-SGA newborns (38.3% vs. 31.4%). CYP2A6*4, GSTM1, and GSTT1 genes alone could not modify the association between SHS exposure and SGA. The combination of CYP2A6*4 and GSTT1 high-risk genotypes (CYP2A6*1/*1 and GSTT1-absent [high-risk] vs. other combinations as a whole [low-risk]) significantly (P value, .045) modified the association between SHS exposure and SGA. Among mothers with high-risk genotypes, SHS during pregnancy was significantly associated with SGA (confounder-adjusted odds ratio, 2.31 [95% confidence interval, 1.20-4.42]). Among mothers with low-risk genotypes, however, SHS exposure during pregnancy was not associated with SGA (1.14 [0.64-2.04]). Chinese pregnant women with the combination of CYP2A6*1/*1 and GSTT1-absent genotypes are at particularly high-risk of SHS-related SGA.
PubMedId: 25847289
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 17, 2014
Authors: Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen, Zhongzheng Niu, Peng Ding, Tao Liu, Yanhui He, Jianmiao Lin, Shixin Yuan, Xiaoling Guo, Deqin Jia, Weiqing Chen
Keywords: Cotinine Secondhand smoke Smoking Caused Disease
Abstract: To compare predictive values of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) by different measures for secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure during pregnancy and to develop and validate a prediction model for SGA using SHS exposure along with sociodemographic and pregnancy factors. We compared the predictability of different measures of SHS exposure during pregnancy for SGA among 545 Chinese pregnant women, and then used the optimal SHS measure along with other clinically available factors to develop and validate a prediction model for SGA. We fit logistic regression models to predict SGA by single measures of SHS exposure (self-report, serum cotinine and CYP2A6*4) and different combinations (self-report+cotinine, cotinine+CYP2A6*4, self-report+CYP2A6*4 and self-report+cotinine+CYP2A6*4). We found that self-reported SHS exposure alone predicted SGA (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve or area under the receiver operating curve (AUROC), 0.578) better than the other two single measures (cotinine, 0.547; CYP2A6*4, 0.529) or as accurately as combined SHS measures (0.545-0.584). The final prediction model that contained self-reported SHS exposure, prepregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain velocity during the second and third trimesters, gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension and the third-trimester biparietal diameter Z-score could predict SGA fairly accurately (AUROC, 0.698). Self-reported SHS exposure at peribirth performs better in predicting SGA than a single measure of serum cotinine at the same time, although repeated biochemical cotinine assessments throughout pregnancy may be optimal. Our simple prediction model is fairly accurate and can be potentially used in routine prenatal care.
PubMedId: 25052864
Journal-article: Tobacco control, vol. 24, 2014
Authors: Z Niu, C Xie, X Wen, F Tian, P Ding, Y He, J Lin, S Yuan, X Guo, D Jia, W-Q Chen
Keywords: Mediation Placental weight Second-hand smoke Small for gestational age
Abstract: The causal relationship between maternal second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure during pregnancy and small for gestational-age (SGA) has been affirmed, but the mechanism is still unclear. Previous studies have found that the placenta remarkably affects fetal intrauterine growth and that SHS exposure during pregnancy impairs placental growth and decreases placental weight. Therefore, the placenta may mediate the association between maternal SHS exposure during pregnancy and SGA. This study explores whether and to what extent the association between maternal SHS exposure during pregnancy and SGA is mediated by the placenta. We investigated 562 pregnant women delivering SGA newborns (cases) and 1581 delivering appropriate-for-gestational-age newborns (controls) in this case-control study. Information on maternal SHS exposure during pregnancy, socio-demographic characteristics and obstetric conditions, including placental weight, were collected at the Maternity and Child Health Care Hospitals of Shenzhen and Foshan in Guangdong, China. Linear and hierarchical logistic regression models were fitted to examine the mediation effects of placental weight on the association between maternal SHS exposure during pregnancy and SGA. After controlling for ethnicity, maternal age, educational level, family income, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), parity, gestational age and newborn gender, maternal SHS exposure during pregnancy was associated with a higher SGA risk (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-1.55) and lower placental weight (standard deviation (SD) = -0.15, SE = 0.04). Regression models illustrated that placental weight partially mediated (49.6%; 95% CI = 35.9-63.3%) the association between SHS exposure during pregnancy and SGA. Our findings suggest that the placenta plays an intermediary role in how maternal prenatal SHS exposure affects fetal growth.
PubMedId: 26051507
Journal-article: Placenta, vol. 36, 2014
Authors: J N Wu, X Z Wen, Y Zhou, D Lin, S Y Zhang, Y S Yan
Keywords: cross-sectional study free-vaccine policy hepatitis B vaccine
Abstract: The extent to which the free-vaccine policy impacts the initiation and completion of a hepatitis B vaccine series is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the free-vaccine policy on hepatitis B vaccination. A provincial survey was conducted in 2006 in Fujian Province, south-east of China, where the free-vaccine policy for hepatitis B was announced in 2002 and implemented in 2003. A total of 1628 children were investigated, and 1443 (88.6%) were included in this analysis. Among the children studied, 55.2% were vaccinated within 24 h of birth, and 76.1% completed the hepatitis B vaccine series on time. The rate of hepatitis B surface antibody positivity increased from 29.9% among children born in 1992 to 90.5% among children born in 2005, while the corresponding HBV infection rate decreased from 30.4% to 1.72%. Logistic regression indicated that, compared to children born between 1996 and 2001, the odds ratios (ORs) for timely initiation were 2.57 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-3.84), 5.24 (95% CI, 3.26-8.43) and 9.06 (95% CI, 4.48-18.34) among children born in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively; the corresponding ORs for completing the vaccine series were 4.23 (95% CI, 1.97-9.10), 3.76 (95% CI, 1.81-7.82) and 4.94 (95% CI, 1.74-14.00) among children born in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Children with delayed vaccine initiation (>24 h after birth) were less likely to complete the vaccine series than those who received a timely first dose (OR = 0.02, 95% CI, 0.005-0.09). The impact of the free-vaccine policy on vaccine initiation and vaccine series completion did not differ by children's residence area (rural vs urban). As hypothesized, the odds of completing the vaccine series increased after the free-vaccine policy was announced in 2002 among children with delayed initiation (>24 h after birth) but not among those with timely initiation ( 24 h after birth). In conclusion, the free-vaccine policy significantly improved the timely initiation and completion of the vaccine series. The impact of this policy on completion of the vaccine series was larger among children with delayed vaccine initiation.
PubMedId: 25377649
Journal-article: Journal of viral hepatitis, vol. 22, 2014
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Kai Ling Kong, Rina Das Eiden, Neha Navneet Sharma, Chuanbo Xie
Keywords: dietary patterns epidemiology feeding growth infant nutrition
Abstract: To identify dietary patterns in US infants at age 6 and 12 months, sociodemographic differences in these patterns, and their associations with infant growth from age 6 to 12 months. We analyzed a subsample (760 boys and 795 girls) of the Infant Feeding Practices Study II (2005-2007). Mothers reported their infants' intakes of 18 types of foods in the past 7 days, which were used to derive dietary patterns at ages 6 and 12 months by principal component analysis. Similar dietary patterns were identified at ages 6 and 12 months. At 12 months, infants of mothers who had low education or non-Hispanic African American mothers (vs non-Hispanic white) had a higher score on "High sugar/fat/protein" dietary pattern. Both "High sugar/fat/protein" and "High dairy/regular cereal" patterns at 6 months were associated with a smaller increase in length-for-age z score (adjusted per 1 unit dietary pattern score, -1.36 [95% confidence interval (CI), -2.35 to -0.37] and -0.30 [-0.54 to -0.06], respectively), while with greater increase in BMI z score (1.00 [0.11 to 1.89] and 0.32 [0.10 to 0.53], respectively) from age 6 to 12 months. The "Formula" pattern was associated with greater increase in BMI z score (0.25 [0.09 to 0.40]). The "Infant guideline solids" pattern (vegetables, fruits, baby cereal, and meat) was not associated with change in length-for-age or BMI z score. Distinct dietary patterns exist among US infants, vary by maternal race/ethnicity and education, and have differential influences on infant growth. Use of "Infant guideline solids" with prolonged breastfeeding is a promising healthy diet for infants after age 6 months.
PubMedId: 25311608
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 134, 2014
Authors: Michael J Casey, Xuerong Wen, Liise K Kayler, Ravi Aiyer, Juan C Scornik, Herwig-Ulf Meier-Kriesche
Abstract: When kidney transplants fail, transplant medications are discontinued to reduce immunosuppression-related risks. However, retransplant candidates are at risk for allosensitization which prolonging immunosuppression may minimize. We hypothesized that for these patients, a prolonged immunosuppression withdrawal after graft failure preserves nonsensitization status (PRA 0%) better than early immunosuppression withdrawal. We retrospectively examined subjects transplanted at a single center between July 1, 1999 and December 1, 2009 with a non-death-related graft loss. Subjects were stratified by timing of immunosuppression withdrawal after graft loss: early (3 months) or prolonged (>3 months). Retransplant candidates were eligible for the main study where the primary outcome was nonsensitization at retransplant evaluation. Non-retransplant candidates were included in the safety analysis only. We found 102 subjects with non-death-related graft loss of which 49 were eligible for the main study. Nonsensitization rates at retransplant evaluation were 30% and 66% for the early and prolonged immunosuppression withdrawal groups, respectively (P=0.01). After adjusting for cofactors such as blood transfusion and allograft nephrectomy, prolonged immunosuppression withdrawal remained significantly associated with nonsensitization (adjusted odds ratio=5.78, 95% CI [1.37-24.44]). No adverse safety signals were seen in the prolonged immunosuppression withdrawal group compared to the early immunosuppression withdrawal group. These results suggest that prolonged immunosuppression may be a safe strategy to minimize sensitization in retransplant candidates and provide the basis for larger or prospective studies for further verification.
PubMedId: 24717218
Journal-article: Transplantation, vol. 98, 2014
Authors: Lacy Reynolds, Rohit S Mulik, Xiaodong Wen, Archana Dilip, Ian R Corbin
Keywords: docosahexaenoic acid liver cancer low-density lipoprotein low-density lipoprotein receptor nanoparticle omega-3 fatty acids
Abstract: The natural omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has recently been credited for possessing anticancer properties. Herein, we investigate the cytotoxic actions of DHA-loaded low-density lipoprotein (LDL) nanoparticles in normal and liver cancer cells. LDL-DHA nanoparticles were prepared and subjected to extensive biophysical characterization. The therapeutic utility of LDL-DHA nanoparticles was evaluated in normal and malignant murine hepatocyte cell lines, TIB-73 and TIB-75, respectively. The engineered LDL-DHA nanoparticles possessed enhanced physical and oxidative stabilities over native LDL and free DHA. Dose-response studies showed that therapeutic doses of LDL-DHA nanoparticles that completely killed TIB-75 were innocuous to TIB-73. The selective induction of lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species in the cancer cells was shown to play a central role in LDL-DHA nanoparticle-mediated cytotoxicity. In summary, these findings indicate that LDL-DHA nanoparticles show great promise as a selective anticancer agent against hepatocellular carcinoma.
PubMedId: 24397600
Journal-article: Nanomedicine (London, England), vol. 9, 2014
Authors: Liise K Kayler, Xuerong Wen, Mareena Zacharai, Michael Casey, Jesse Schold, Joseph Magliocca
PubMedId: 24313288
Journal-article: Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation, vol. 27, 2013
Authors: Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen, Peng Ding, Tao Liu, Yanhui He, Zhongzheng Niu, Jianmiao Lin, Shixin Yuan, Xiaoling Guo, Deqin Jia, Weiqing Chen
Abstract: Serum cotinine is a common biomarker for smoking and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure, but it can be affected by the activity of nicotine-metabolizing enzymes. This study investigated the influence of CYP2A6*4 genotypes on serum cotinine among nonsmoking pregnant women. We analyzed the data from 545 Chinese nonsmoking pregnant women in a case-control study on SHS exposure and birth outcomes in southern China. Participants self-reported their status and duration of SHS exposure during pregnancy right after delivery in hospital. Research staff used polymerase chain reaction to genotype CYP2A6*4 and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure cotinine levels in maternal serum samples collected before delivery. We stratified women by their self-reported SHS exposure status and CYP2A6*4 genotypes and then compared their median levels of serum cotinine. Among women who self-reported non-SHS exposure (n = 317), the median serum cotinine levels were 2.83ng/ml for those with CYP2A6*1/*1 genotype, 1.39ng/ml for CYP2A6*1/*4, and 0.77ng/ml for CYP2A6*4/*4, respectively. Among women who self-reported SHS exposure (n = 228), the median cotinine levels were 3.32ng/ml for those with CYP2A6*1/*1 genotype, 2.38ng/ml for CYP2A6*1/*4, and 1.56ng/ml for CYP2A6*4/*4, respectively. Strikingly, self-reported SHS-exposed women with CYP2A6*1/*4 or CYP2A6*4/*4 genotype had significantly lower (rather than higher) median cotinine levels than self-reported non-SHS-exposed women with CYP2A6*1/*1 genotype (p = .012). CYP2A6*4 genotype is associated with lower serum cotinine among Chinese nonsmoking pregnant women. Measuring CYP2A6*4 genotype may help to improve the validity of SHS exposure measurement by serum cotinine in pregnant women and possibly also in other nonpregnant populations.
PubMedId: 24163286
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 16, 2013
Authors: Jennifer K Cheng, Xiaozhong Wen, Kristen D Coletti, Joanne E Cox, Elsie M Taveras
Abstract: Objective. To examine body mass index (BMI) changes among pediatric multidisciplinary weight management participants and nonparticipants. Design. In this retrospective database analysis, we used multivariable mixed effect models to compare 2-year BMI z-score trajectories among 583 eligible overweight or obese children referred to the One Step Ahead program at the Boston Children's Primary Care Center between 2003 and 2009. Results. Of the referred children, 338 (58%) attended the program; 245 (42%) did not participate and were instead followed by their primary care providers within the group practice. The mean BMI z-score of program participants decreased modestly over a 2-year period and was lower than that of nonparticipants. The group-level difference in the rate of change in BMI z-score between participants and nonparticipants was statistically significant for 0-6 months (P = 0.001) and 19-24 months (P = 0.008); it was marginally significant for 13-18 months (P = 0.051) after referral. Younger participants (<5 years) had better outcomes across all time periods examined. Conclusion. Children attending a multidisciplinary program experienced greater BMI z-score reductions compared with usual primary care in a real world practice; younger participants had significantly better outcomes. Future research should consider early intervention and cost-effectiveness analyses.
PubMedId: 24672556
Journal-article: International journal of pediatrics, vol. 2014, 2013
Authors: Liise K Kayler, Xuerong Wen, Mareena Zachariah, Michael Casey, Jesse Schold, Joseph Magliocca
Keywords: age matching pancreas transplantation
Abstract: Outcomes of old-donor simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT) have not been thoroughly studied. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data reported for SPKT candidates receiving dialysis wait-listed between 1993 and 2008 (n=7937) were analyzed for outcomes among those who remained listed (n=3301) and of SPKT recipients (n=4636) using multivariable time-dependent regression models. Recipients were stratified by donor/recipient age (cutoff 40years) into: young-to-young (n=2099), young-to-old (n=1873), old-to-young (n=293), and old-to-old (n=371). The overall mortality was 12%, 14%, 20%, and 24%, respectively, for those transplanted, and 50% for those remaining on the waiting list. On multivariable analysis, old-donor SPKT was associated with significantly higher overall risks of patient death, death-censored pancreas, and kidney graft failure in both young (73%, 53%, and 63% increased risk, respectively) and old (91%, 124%, and 85% increased risk, respectively) recipients. The adjusted relative mortality risk was similar for recipients of old-donor SPKT compared with wait-listed patients including those who subsequently received young-donor transplants (aHR 0.95; 95% CI 0.78, 1.12) except for candidates in OPOs with waiting times 604days (aHR 0.65, 95% CI 0.45-0.94). Old-donor SPKT results in significantly worse graft survival and patient mortality without any waiting-time benefit as compared to young-donor SPKT, except for candidates with expected long waiting times.
PubMedId: 23819508
Journal-article: Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation, vol. 26, 2013
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Edmond D Shenassa, Angela D Paradis
Abstract: To examine the association between exposure to tobacco compounds in breast milk and risk of childhood overweight, we used historical data for a subset of 21,063 mother-child pairs in the US Collaborative Perinatal Project. Based on self-reports, mothers were classified as non-smokers, light (1-9 cigarettes/day), moderate (10-19), or heavy (20+) smokers. Feeding type (exclusive breastfeeding or bottle-feeding) was observed during nursery stay after birth. We stratified children by maternal smoking and feeding type, and then fit interaction terms to isolate exposure to tobacco compounds via breast milk from exposure in uterus and in ambient air after birth. Using measured weight and height, overweight at age 7 was defined as a body mass index 85th percentile by sex and age. Among exclusively bottle-fed children, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of overweight at age 7 were 1.24 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.38; vs. non-smoking) for light maternal smoking, 1.43 (95% CI, 1.25-1.63) for moderate maternal smoking, and 1.46 (95% CI, 1.28-1.66) for heavy maternal smoking. Among exclusively breastfed children, the corresponding ORs were 1.33 (95% CI, 0.96-1.84) for light, 1.86 (95% CI, 1.27-2.73) for moderate, and 2.22 (95% CI, 1.53-3.20) for heavy maternal smoking. There was a modest positive interaction between breastfeeding and heavy maternal smoking on overweight risk at age 7. Tobacco compounds via breast milk of smoking mothers (significantly for heavy smokers) appear to be associated with a modest elevation in childhood overweight risk at 7 years of age. More aggressive intervention is needed to help pregnant and breastfeeding women to quit smoking.
PubMedId: 22714798
Journal-article: Maternal and child health journal, vol. 17, 2012
Authors: T Liu, R F Tyndale, S P David, H Wang, X-Q Yu, W Chen, X-Z Wen, W-Q Chen
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess whether cytochrome P450 enzyme 2A6 (CYP2A6) genotypes moderate the association between smoking and hypertension. In this study, 954 Chinese male current smokers from a community-based chronic disease screening project in Guangzhou were interviewed with a structured questionnaire about socio-demographic status, smoking and other health-related behaviors. Blood was collected for DNA extraction and CYP2A6 genotyping. Hypertension was defined according to 2007 ESH-ESC Practice Guidelines. A multivariate logistic regression was performed to examine the interaction between smoking quantity and CYP2A6 genotypes on hypertension after adjusting for age, education level and other potential confounders. Multivariate analyses indicated that smoking more than 15 cigarettes per day significantly increased the risk of hypertension (odds ratio (OR)=1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.21-2.10) compared with smoking 1-15 cigarettes per day, and further suggested that smoking interacted with normal CYP2A6 metabolizer genotype to increase the risk of hypertension. Smokers consuming more than 15 cigarettes per day with normal CYP2A6 metabolizer genotypes had the highest risk of hypertension (OR=2.04, 95% CI=1.11-3.75) compared with those consuming 1-15 cigarettes per day with slower CYP2A6 metabolizer genotypes. These findings demonstrated that smoking quantity was positively associated with hypertension and that CYP2A6 genotypes may moderate this relationship.
PubMedId: 22217675
Journal-article: Journal of human hypertension, vol. 27, 2012
Authors: Yi-Juan Luo, Xiao-Zhong Wen, Peng Ding, Yan-Hui He, Chuan-Bo Xie, Tao Liu, Jian-Miao Lin, Shi-Xin Yuan, Xiao-Ling Guo, De-Qin Jia, Li-Hua Chen, Bao-Zhen Huang, Wei-Qing Chen
Abstract: The present study aimed to examine the association between maternal passive smoking during pregnancy and the risk of spontaneous PTD and to explore the potential interaction of the single or joint gene polymorphism of CYP1A1 and GSTs with maternal passive smoking on the risk of spontaneous PTD. We investigated whether the association between maternal passive smoking and PTD can be modified by 2 metabolic genes, i.e. cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), in a case-control study with 198 spontaneous preterm and 524 term deliveries in Shenzhen and Foshan, China. We used logistic regression to test gene-passive smoking interaction, adjusting for maternal socio-demographics and prepregnancy body mass index. Overall, maternal passive smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher risk of PTD (adjusted odds ratio=2.20 [95% confidence interval: 1.56-3.12]). This association was modified by CYP1A1 and GSTs together, but not by any single genotype. For cross-categories of CYP1A1 Msp I and GSTs, maternal passive smoking was associated with higher risk of PTD among those women with CYP1A1 "TC/CC"+ GSTs "null", but not among women with other genotypes; and this interaction was significant (OR=2.66 [95% CI: 1.19-5.97]; P-value: 0.017). For cross-categories of CYP1A1 BsrD I and GSTs, maternal passive smoking was associated with higher risk of PTD only among those women with CYP1A1"AG/GG"+ GSTs "null", but not among women with other genotypes; and this interaction was significant (OR=3.00 [95% CI: 1.17-7.74]; P-value: 0.023). Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of CYP1A1 and GSTs can help to identify vulnerable pregnant women who are subject to high risk of spontaneous PTD due to passive smoking.
PubMedId: 23152866
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 7, 2012
Authors: Jorge Ortiz, Austin Gregg, Xuerong Wen, Farah Karipineni, Liise K Kayler
Abstract: The effect of donor body mass index (BMI) and donor type on kidney transplant outcomes has not been well studied. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data on recipients of deceased-donor kidneys between 1997 and 2010 were reviewed. Donors were categorized by DCD status (DCD, 6932; non-DCD, 90,158) and BMI groups at 5 kg/m(2) increments: 18.5-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-34.9, 35-39.9, 40-44.9, and 45 kg/m(2) . The primary outcome, death-censored graft survival (DCGS), was adjusted for donor, recipient, and transplant characteristics. Among recipients of non-DCD kidneys, donor BMI was not associated with DCGS. Among DCD recipients, donor BMI was not associated with DCGS for donor BMI categories < 45 kg/m(2) ; however, donor BMI 45 kg/m(2) was independently associated with DCGS compared to BMI of 20-24.9 kg/m(2) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.23, 2.74). The adjusted odds of delayed graft function (DGF) was greater for each level of BMI above reference for both DCD and non-DCD groups. There was no association of donor BMI with one-yr acute rejection for either type of donor. Although BMI is associated with DGF, long-term graft survival is not affected except in the combination of DCD with extreme donor BMI 45.
PubMedId: 22686952
Journal-article: Clinical transplantation, vol. 26, 2012
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Matthew W Gillman, Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman, Bettylou Sherry, Ken Kleinman, Elsie M Taveras
Abstract: To examine whether the obesity prevalence is increasing, level, or decreasing among young US children (aged <6 years) in the past decade; and to compare regional data to those of 2 national databases. We analyzed data from 108762 well-child visits (36827 children) at a multisite pediatric practice in eastern Massachusetts during 1999-2008. By using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2000 gender-specific growth charts, we defined obesity as weight-for-length 95th percentile for children aged <24 months and BMI 95th percentile for children aged 24 to <72 months. By using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated gender-specific obesity trends in 2 separate periods, 1999-2003 and 2004-2008, adjusting for age group, race/ethnicity, health insurance, and practice site. From 1999 to 2003, the obesity prevalence was fairly stable among both boys and girls. From 2004 to 2008, the obesity prevalence substantially decreased among both boys and girls. The decline in obesity prevalence during 2004-2008 was more pronounced among children insured by non-Medicaid health plans than among those insured by Medicaid. Among children aged <6 years at this multisite pediatric practice, obesity prevalence decreased during 2004-2008, which is in line with national data showing no increase in prevalence during this time period. The smaller decrease among Medicaid-insured children may portend widening of socioeconomic disparities in childhood obesity.
PubMedId: 22529276
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 129, 2012
Authors: Liise K Kayler, Ivan Zendejas, Austin Gregg, Xuerong Wen
Abstract: The influence of recipient body mass index (BMI) on pediatric-donor kidney transplant outcomes is unclear. We aimed to determine graft survival and functional outcomes of pediatric-donor kidneys compared with adult kidneys stratified by recipient BMI group. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data for recipients from 1996 to 2010 were reviewed. Donors were categorized by transplant type, pediatric single kidney transplant (SKT, n=3712), en bloc kidney transplant (EBK, n=1517), or adult standard criteria donor (SCD, n=66,741). Recipients were stratified by BMI tertiles (<24, 24-29, and >29 kg/m). SKT and EBK from donors 40 kg conferred similar risks of adjusted death-censored graft survival relative to SCDs regardless of recipient BMI except for EBK transplants in recipients with BMI <24 where the effect was protective (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.94). SKT from donors 20 kg conferred worse death-censored graft survival in recipients with BMI <24 (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6) and BMI >29 (aHR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0); however, most of the risk appeared early, and the effect was abrogated with reanalysis conditional on 1-year graft survival. Compared with SCDs, 1-year glomerular filtration rates of SKT from donors 20 kg were significantly higher when transplanted into recipients with BMI <24 (P<0.01) and similar in the other BMI groups. Increasing recipient BMI is not a clear risk factor for outcomes or graft function after transplantation with small pediatric-donor kidneys.
PubMedId: 22262130
Journal-article: Transplantation, vol. 93, 2012
Authors: Yu Ma, Xiaozhong Wen, Jing Peng, Yi Lu, Zhongmin Guo, Jiahai Lu
Abstract: To update and refine systematic literature review on the association between outpatient statins use and mortality in patients with infectious disease. We searched articles published before September 31, 2012, on the association between statins and infectious disease-related mortality through electronic databases. Eligible articles were analyzed in Review Manager 5.1. We conducted stratification analysis by study design, infection types, clinical outcomes and study locations. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for death (statins use vs. no use) across the 41 included studies was 0.71 (95% confidence interval: 0.64, 0.78). The corresponding pooled ORs were 0.58 (0.38, 0.90), 0.66 (0.57, 0.75), 0.71 (0.57, 0.89) and 0.83 (0.67, 1.04) for the case-control study, retrospective cohort studies, prospective cohort studies and RCTs; 0.40 (0.20, 0.78), 0.61 (0.41, 0.90), 0.69 (0.62, 0.78) and 0.86 (0.68, 1.09) for bacteremia, sepsis, pneumonia and other infections; 0.62 (0.534, 0.72), 0.68 (0.53, 0.89), 0.71 (0.61, 0.83) and 0.86 (0.70, 1.07) for 30-day, 90-day, in-hospital and long-term (>1 year) mortality, respectively. Outpatient statins use is associated with a lower risk of death in patients with infectious disease in observational studies, but in a less extent in clinical trials. This association also varies considerably by infection types and clinical outcomes.
PubMedId: 23284711
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 7, 2012
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Elizabeth W Triche, Joseph W Hogan, Edmond D Shenassa, Stephen L Buka
Abstract: Some prenatal factors may program an offspring's blood pressure, but existing evidence is inconclusive and mechanisms remain unclear. We examined the mediating roles of intrauterine and childhood growth in the associations between childhood systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 5 potentially modifiable prenatal factors: maternal smoking during pregnancy; prepregnancy BMI; pregnancy weight gain; chronic hypertension; and preeclampsia-eclampsia. The sample contained 30 461 mother-child pairs in the Collaborative Perinatal Project. Prenatal data were extracted from obstetric forms, and children's SBP was measured at 7 years of age. Potential mediation by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and childhood growth was examined by the causal step method. Heavy maternal smoking during pregnancy was significantly associated with higher offspring SBP (adjusted mean difference versus nonsmoking: 0.73 mm Hg [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32-1.14]), which attenuated to null (0.13 [95% CI: -0.27-0.54]) after adjustment for changes in BMI from birth to 7 years of age. Prepregnancy overweight-obesity was significantly associated with higher offspring SBP (versus normal weight: 0.89 mm Hg [95% CI: 0.52-1.26]), which also attenuated to null (-0.04 mm Hg [95% CI: -0.40-0.31]) after adjustment for childhood BMI trajectory. Adjustment for BMI trajectory augmented the association between maternal pregnancy weight gain and offspring SBP. Adjustment for childhood weight trajectory similarly changed these associations. However, all these associations were independent of IUGR. Childhood BMI and weight trajectory, but not IUGR, may largely mediate the associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy and prepregnancy BMI with an offspring's SBP.
PubMedId: 21300676
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 127, 2011
Authors: Min-Yan Han, Wei-Qing Chen, Xiao-Zhong Wen, Cai-Hua Liang, Wen-Hua Ling
Abstract: Previous studies in the world reported inconsistent results about the relationship of medical professional education with medical students' smoking behaviors, and no similar research had been published in China. This paper aims to explore whether the differences of smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors existed between medical and non-medical undergraduate students. Eight thousand one hundred thirty-eight undergraduate students sampled from a university in Guangzhou were investigated with a self-administered structured questionnaire about their smoking-related knowledge, attitude and behaviors, and other relevant factors. General linear model and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to test the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitude, and behaviors between medical and non-medical students while controlling for potential confounding variables. There was no difference in smoking-related knowledge scores between medical and non-medical freshmen, but medical sophomores and juniors had higher scores of smoking-related knowledge than their non-medical counterparts. The medical sophomores had higher mean score of attitudes towards smoking than non-medical ones. Before entering university, the difference in the prevalence of experimental and regular smoking between medical and non-medical college students was not significant. After entering university, in contrast, the overall prevalence of regular smoking was significantly higher among male non-medical college students than among male medical students. Stratified by current academic year, this difference was significant only among male sophomores. Medical students have higher smoking-related knowledge, stronger anti-smoking attitude, and lower prevalence of regular smoking than non-medical college students of similar age, which may be associated with medical professional education.
PubMedId: 21246317
Journal-article: International journal of behavioral medicine, vol. 19, 2011
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Ken Kleinman, Matthew W Gillman, Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman, Elsie M Taveras
Abstract: Modeling childhood body mass index (BMI) trajectories, versus estimating change in BMI between specific ages, may improve prediction of later body-size-related outcomes. Prior studies of BMI trajectories are limited by restricted age periods and insufficient use of trajectory information. Among 3,289 children seen at 81,550 pediatric well-child visits from infancy to 18 years between 1980 and 2008, we fit individual BMI trajectories using mixed effect models with fractional polynomial functions. From each child's fitted trajectory, we estimated age and BMI at infancy peak and adiposity rebound, and velocity and area under curve between 1 week, infancy peak, adiposity rebound, and 18 years. Among boys, mean (SD) ages at infancy BMI peak and adiposity rebound were 7.2 (0.9) and 49.2 (11.9) months, respectively. Among girls, mean (SD) ages at infancy BMI peak and adiposity rebound were 7.4 (1.1) and 46.8 (11.0) months, respectively. Ages at infancy peak and adiposity rebound were weakly inversely correlated (r = -0.09). BMI at infancy peak and adiposity rebound were positively correlated (r = 0.76). Blacks had earlier adiposity rebound and greater velocity from adiposity rebound to 18 years of age than whites. Higher birth weight z-score predicted earlier adiposity rebound and higher BMI at infancy peak and adiposity rebound. BMI trajectories did not differ by birth year or type of health insurance, after adjusting for other socio-demographics and birth weight z-score. Childhood BMI trajectory characteristics are informative in describing childhood body mass changes and can be estimated conveniently. Future research should evaluate associations of these novel BMI trajectory characteristics with adult outcomes.
PubMedId: 22458308
Journal-article: BMC medical research methodology, vol. 12, 2011
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Edmond D Shenassa
Abstract: To conduct the first study to examine potential interaction between parenting style and neighborhood quality on the risk of adolescent regular smoking. We analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents (n = 1,213 pairs of adolescents and their parents) who participated in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics during 2002-2003. Regular smoking behavior and parental monitoring level were reported by adolescents. Parenting style (i.e., authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and uninvolved) was defined by cross-classifying self-reported parental warmth and control. Based on parents' perceived neighborhood quality regarding raising children, neighborhoods were identified as either higher quality or lower quality. Adolescents in lower-quality neighborhoods were more likely to be regular smokers (13.7% vs. 8.5%; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.02-3.65) than those in higher-quality neighborhoods. In lower-quality neighborhoods, adolescents of authoritarian parents (16.9%; AOR = 10.97, 95% CI = 3.36-35.84) were more likely and those of uninvolved parents (20.3%; AOR = 3.47, 95% CI = 0.91-13.17) were marginally more likely to be regular smokers than those of authoritative parents (4.3%). However, among adolescents in higher-quality neighborhoods, parenting style was independent of the risk of regular smoking. There was marginally significant interaction between authoritarian parenting style and neighborhood quality. Parental monitoring was associated with reduced risk of adolescent smoking, regardless of neighborhood quality. There was no interaction between parental monitoring and neighborhood quality. Authoritative parenting is associated with reduced risk of adolescent regular smoking in lower-quality neighborhoods but not in higher-quality neighborhoods. Authoritative parenting style and parental monitoring may buffer adverse influences of low-quality neighborhood.
PubMedId: 22121244
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 14, 2011
Authors: Tao Liu, Sean P David, Rachel F Tyndale, Hui Wang, Qian Zhou, Peng Ding, Yan-Hui He, Xue-Qing Yu, Wei Chen, Casey Crump, Xiao-Zhong Wen, Wei-Qing Chen
Abstract: To investigate the association of CYP2A6 genetic polymorphisms with smoking-related phenotypes in Chinese smokers. Case-only genetic association study. Southern China. A total of 1328 Han Chinese smokers who participated in a community-based chronic disease screening project in Guangzhou and Zhuhai from 2006 to 2007. All participants answered a structured questionnaire about socio-demographic status and smoking behaviors and informative alleles were genotyped for the cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) gene (CYP2A6*4,*5,*7,*9 and *10). The frequencies of CYP2A6*4, *5, *7, *9 and *10 alleles were 8.5, 1.2, 6.3, 13.5 and 2.4%, which corresponded to 48.9, 15.4, 24.2 and 11.5% of participants being classified as normal, intermediate, slow and poor metabolizers, respectively. Multivariate analyses in male smokers demonstrated that compared with normal metabolizers, poor metabolizers reported smoking fewer cigarettes per day [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32-0.76], started smoking regularly later in life (adjusted OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.06-2.26) and, among former smokers, reported smoking for a shorter duration prior to quitting (adjusted OR = 0.33; 95% CI: 0.12-0.94). However, poor metabolizers were less likely to quit smoking and remain abstinent than normal metabolizers (adjusted OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.34-0.86). Reduced metabolism function of cytochrome P450 2A6 in smokers appears to be associated with fewer cigarettes smoked, later initiation of smoking regularly, shorter smoking duration and lower likelihood of smoking cessation.
PubMedId: 21205058
Journal-article: Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 106, 2011
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Elizabeth W Triche, Joseph W Hogan, Edmond D Shenassa, Stephen L Buka
Abstract: Being born small-for-gestational-age (SGA) is associated with hypercholesterolemia in later life. It is possible that only certain subgroups of SGA are at elevated risk for hypercholesterolemia. We examined the associations between SGA subgroups based on levels of maternal smoking during pregnancy and adult hypercholesterolemia. A subsample of 1625 adult offspring from the Collaborative Perinatal Project were followed at mean age 39 years. Subjects were classified by recorded fetal growth and maternal smoking status during pregnancy. Clinical diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia was obtained in interviews. Compared with the appropriate-for-gestational-age subgroup without maternal smoking during pregnancy, only SGA subgroups with maternal smoking during pregnancy had higher risk of hypercholesterolemia: for heavy smoking, adjusted hazard ratio = 2.5 (95% confidence interval = 1.4-4.3); moderate smoking, 1.7 (1.0-2.8); nonsmoking, 1.1 (0.5-2.1). Only SGA infants whose mothers smoked during pregnancy had elevated risk of hypercholesterolemia in adulthood.
PubMedId: 20798636
Journal-article: Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 21, 2010
Authors: Melissa A Clark, Crystal D Linkletter, Xiaozhong Wen, Edward Alan Miller, Vincent Mor
Abstract: A challenge in the adoption of long-term care (LTC) policy reform is the number of constituency groups active in LTC and historical antagonism among these groups regarding critical issues such as LTC financing and regulation. As part of a national survey of LTC specialists, the authors asked previously identified specialists to nominate other "experts" with known or demonstrable experience in LTC. As a proxy for potential information exchange, data about nominations were used to construct and describe the networks of LTC specialists representing consumer advocates, provider representatives, public officials, policy experts, and others. Associations between network characteristics and attitudes about LTC policy reform were also examined. Individuals tended to nominate other people within their same constituency group as experts. Academic and research-based policy experts were most likely to be classified as prominent network members. Network structure was associated with attitudes toward LTC financing but not the regulation of nursing homes.
PubMedId: 20442338
Journal-article: Medical care research and review : MCRR, vol. 67, 2010
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Weiqing Chen, Kim M Gans, Suzanne M Colby, Ciyong Lu, Caihua Liang, Wenhua Ling
Abstract: The prevalence of adolescent smoking has been increasing rapidly in China. Theory-based smoking prevention programmes in schools may be an effective approach in preventing smoking among Chinese adolescents. A school-level cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted among 7th and 8th grade students (N = 2343) in four junior high schools in southern China during 2004-06. The theory-based, multi-level intervention was compared with the standard health curriculum. Outcome measures comprised changes in students' smoking-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. The mean knowledge scores from baseline to the 1- and 2-year follow-ups increased more in the intervention group than in the control group, whereas there was little change in attitude scores. At the 1-year follow-up (the total sample), the interventions reduced the probability of baseline experimental smokers' escalating to regular smoker [7.9 vs 18.3%; adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.97, P = 0.043], but did not reduce the probability of baseline non-smokers' initiating smoking (7.9 vs 10.6%; adjusted OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.54-1.38, P = 0.538). At the 2-year follow-up (only 7th grade students), similar proportions of baseline non-smokers initiated smoking in the intervention group and the control group (13.5 vs 13.1%), while a possibly lower proportion of baseline experimental smokers escalated to regular smoking in the intervention group than the control group (22.6 vs 40.0%; adjusted OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.12-1.57, P = 0.199). This multi-level intervention programme had a moderate effect on inhibiting the escalation from experimental to regular smoking among Chinese adolescents, but had little effect on the initiation of smoking. The programme improved adolescents' smoking-related knowledge, but did not change their attitudes towards smoking.
PubMedId: 20236984
Journal-article: International journal of epidemiology, vol. 39, 2010
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Elizabeth W Triche, Joseph W Hogan, Edmond D Shenassa, Stephen L Buka
Abstract: We tested hypotheses that disproportionately large placental size and vascular lesions were associated with high systolic blood pressure (SBP); and these associations might be more evident with age. The sample included 13 273 of 40 666 full-term singletons in the Collaborative Perinatal Project. Placentas were examined by pathologists blinded of pregnancy courses and outcomes. The 4-month and 7-year SBPs were measured with palpation and auscultation methods, respectively. We found that placental weight (adjusted mean difference corresponding to an increase by 1 SD 0.50 [95% CI, 0.33 to 0.68]) and placenta-fetus weight ratio (0.37 [95% CI, 0.19 to 0.54]) was positively associated with 7-year SBP but not associated with 4-month SBP. Placental largest and smallest diameters and area were negatively associated with 4-month SBP but positively with 7-year SBP. Placental thickness was negatively associated with 4-month SBP only. Placental volume was negatively associated with 4-month SBP (-0.60 [95% CI, - 0.85 to -0.35]) but positively associated with 7-year SBP (0.48 [95% CI, 0.30 to 0.67]). Thrombi in cord vessels (adjusted mean difference versus absence 2.73 [95% CI, - 0.03 to 5.50]) and decidual vessels (2.58 [95% CI, 0.24 to 4.91]), villous microinfarcts (1.63 [95% CI, 0.71 to 2.55]), necrosis at the decidual margin (1.57 [95% CI, 0.54 to 2.59]), and basalis (3.44 [95% CI, 1.55 to 5.32]) were associated with higher 4-month SBP only. We conclude that placental inefficiency, reflected by disproportionately large weight and size, predicts long-term blood pressure, whereas vascular resistance and lesions may only influence short-term blood pressure.
PubMedId: 21079045
Journal-article: Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), vol. 57, 2010
Authors: Melissa A Clark, Michelle L Rogers, Xiaozhong Wen, Victoria Wilcox, Kate McCarthy-Barnett, Jeanne Panarace, Carol Manning, Susan Allen, William Rakowski
Abstract: Unmarried women with disabilities may be a particularly vulnerable group for underutilization of repeat mammography screening. Our goal was to compare the breast cancer screening experiences of unmarried women with disabilities (WWD) versus women with no disabilities (WND), and determine whether these experiences are associated with adherence to repeat screening. We conducted a matched cohort study of 93 WWD and 93 WND to compare mammography experiences by disability status, examine rates of repeat mammography by disability status, and identify factors that are associated with repeat mammography. WWD were less likely to be on-schedule than WND in univariable (54.8% vs. 71.0%; relative risk, 0.77; 95% confidence limits, 0.61, 0.97), but not multivariable, analyses. In multivariable analyses, there was a significant interaction between disability status and positive experiences as the reasons for returning to the same mammography facility. Among WND, repeat screening ranged from 59% to 86%, depending on the number of positive experiences endorsed (range, 1-5). In contrast, among WWD, screening rates were only 37% among those who did not report any positive experiences and increased to a maximum of 60% regardless of whether women endorsed one to four or all five positive experiences. Severity and type of disability were not associated with repeat screening. WWD may be less likely than WND to remain on-schedule for mammography. WWD who do not report any positive experiences as reasons for returning to a mammography facility may be at particularly high risk of underutilization of screening.
PubMedId: 19775912
Journal-article: Women's health issues : official publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health, vol. 19, 2009
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Weiqing Chen, Zhengmin Qian, Joshua E Muscat, Ciyong Lu, Wenhua Ling
Abstract: The prevalence of smoking among Chinese adolescents has dramatically increased in recent years. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among Chinese students in 3 types of secondary schools. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 3,957 students of seventh, eighth, and ninth grades and 2,870 student parents from 3 public, 1 factory, and 2 general-paid private secondary schools at Guangzhou in 2004. Participants were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires about sociodemographic characteristics, smoking-related family and school environments, smoking-related knowledge and attitudes, and smoking behaviors. The average scores of students' smoking-related knowledge and attitudes (higher score, more against smoking) were highest in the factory school, followed by public schools and private schools. The differences among them were statistically significantly (P < .05). The lifetime smoking prevalence was also significantly different (P < .001) among 3 types of schools: 35.4% in private schools, 17.4% in public schools, and 13.2% in the factory school. The prevalence of students' weekly smoking was also higher in private schools (6.2%) than in public schools (4.9%) or the factory school (4.0%). Similar disparity was observed in the prevalence of daily smoking (3.9% private, 3.5% public, and 2.7% factory). However, differences in weekly and daily smoking were not statistically significant (P > .05). Compared with students in public and factory schools, those in general-paid private schools had poorer smoking-related knowledge, more supportive attitudes toward smoking, and more popular smoking behaviors. Therefore, more intensive smoking prevention programs should be implemented among them.
PubMedId: 18177300
Journal-article: The Journal of school health, vol. 78, 2008
Authors: Xiao-zhong Wen, Jian-hua Huang, Wei-qing Chen, Cai-hua Liang, Ke Han, Wen-hua Ling
PubMedId: 17575926
English Abstract: Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi, vol. 28, 2007
Authors: Xiao-zhong Wen, Wei-qing Chen, Ci-yong Lu, Cai-hua Liang, Cai-xia Zhang, Ke Han, Yong-jun Ou, Wen-hua Ling
PubMedId: 17649651
Journal Article: Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi, vol. 28, 2007
Authors: Quan Qiu, Wei-qing Chen, Xiao-zhong Wen, Yong-jun Ou, Wen-hua Ling
PubMedId: 17850707
English Abstract: Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi, vol. 28, 2007
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Weiqing Chen, Caihua Liang, Ciyong Lu
PubMedId: 17712952
Journal Article: Wei sheng yan jiu = Journal of hygiene research, vol. 36, 2007
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Weiqing Chen, Caihua Liang, Quan Qiu
PubMedId: 17953222
Journal Article: Wei sheng yan jiu = Journal of hygiene research, vol. 36, 2007
Authors: Xiao-zhong Wen, Wei-qing Chen, Ci-yong Lu, Cai-xia Zhang, Yi-juan Luo, Xue-qing Deng, Yong-jun Ou, Wen-hua Ling
PubMedId: 16792893
English Abstract: Zhonghua liu xing bing xue za zhi = Zhonghua liuxingbingxue zazhi, vol. 27, 2006
Authors: Xiao-Zhong Wen, Wei-Qing Chen, Ci-Yong Lu, Cai-Xia Zhang
PubMedId: 16921758
English Abstract: Wei sheng yan jiu = Journal of hygiene research, vol. 35, 2006
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Weiqing Chen, Joshua E Muscat, Zhengmin Qian, Ciyong Lu, Caixia Zhang, Yijuan Luo, Caihua Liang, Ke Han, Xueqing Deng, Yongjun Ou, Wenhua Ling
Abstract: To identify modifiable family and school environmental factors associated with Chinese adolescent smoking behaviors including never-smoking, experimental smoking, regular smoking, and attempting to quit. A cross-sectional survey using self-reported questionnaires was conducted in Huangpu, Guangzhou in December of 2004. A total of 3957 pupils agreed to complete the questionnaires. The prevalence odds ratio (risk) of experimental smoking was compared to never-smoking, adjusting for gender and age in unconditional logistic regression analysis. The risk of regular smoking was compared to experimental smoking, and the risk of attempting quitting was analyzed in regular smokers. The cigarette smoking of peers, mothers, fathers, brothers, and supervising teachers, passive smoking, and seeing someone smoking on campus increased the risk of experimental smoking vs. nonsmoking, while no-smoking signs, perceived anti-tobacco atmosphere in school, and being taught smoking-related health knowledge decreased the risk. The factors associated with regular smoking compared to experimental smoking included the smoking of peers, brothers, fathers and supervising teachers, teacher's tolerance, and passive smoking. Being taught smoking-related knowledge, perceived anti-tobacco atmosphere and no-smoking signs in school were positively associated with regular smoker's attempt to quit, while supervising teacher's smoking, parents' and teachers' tolerance could delay it. These modifiable family and school environmental factors as well as their interaction with gender and age should be highly considered in adolescent smoking prevention in China.
PubMedId: 17433427
Journal-article: Preventive medicine, vol. 45, 2006
Presented by CUBS © 2022