UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Thomas A. Russo UB Profile
Medicine
Professor and Chief, Infectious Disease
"Jacobs School of Medicine of Biomedical Sciences, room 5212"
955 Main St.
Buffalo NY 14203
716-829-2674
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: James R Johnson, Thomas A Russo
PubMedId: 29667573
Journal Article: EcoSal Plus, vol. 8, 2018
Authors: James R Johnson, Thomas A Russo
PubMedId: 29298155
Journal Article: The New England journal of medicine, vol. 378, 2018
Authors: James R. Johnson, Thomas A. Russo
Journal-article: New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 378, pp. 48-59, 2018
Authors: Travis B Nielsen, Paul Pantapalangkoor, Brian M Luna, Kevin W Bruhn, Jun Yan, Ken Dekitani, Sarah Hsieh, Brandon Yeshoua, Bryan Pascual, Evgeny Vinogradov, Kristine M Hujer, T Nicholas Domitrovic, Robert A Bonomo, Thomas A Russo, Magda Lesczcyniecka, Thomas Schneider, Brad Spellberg
PubMedId: 28931235
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 216, pp. 489-501, 2017
Authors: Jeffrey Bulger, Ulrike MacDonald, Ruth Olson, Janet Beanan, Thomas A. Russo
PubMedId: 28717029
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 85, pp. e00093-17, 2017
Authors: Shun Xin Wang-Lin, Ruth Olson, Janet M Beanan, Ulrike MacDonald, Joseph P Balthasar, Thomas A Russo
PubMedId: 28947651
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 85, 2017
Authors: Han Du, Sumant Puri, Andrew McCall, Hannah L Norris, Thomas Russo, Mira Edgerton
PubMedId: 28261570
1: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology, vol. 7, 2016
Authors: John K Diep, David M Jacobs, Rajnikant Sharma, Jenna Covelli, Dana R Bowers, Thomas A Russo, Gauri G Rao
Keywords: Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase pharmacodynamics polymyxin B triple combination
Abstract: Safe and effective therapies are urgently needed to treat polymyxin-resistant KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infections and suppress the emergence of resistance. We investigated the pharmacodynamics of polymyxin B, rifampin, and meropenem alone and as polymyxin B-based double and triple combinations against KPC-producing K. pneumoniae isolates. The rates and extents of killing with polymyxin B (1 to 128 mg/liter), rifampin (2 to 16 mg/liter), and meropenem (10 to 120 mg/liter) were evaluated against polymyxin B-susceptible (PBs) and polymyxin B-resistant (PBr) clinical isolates using 48-h static time-kill studies. Additionally, humanized triple-drug regimens of polymyxin B (concentration at steady state [Css] values of 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/liter), 600 mg rifampin every 12 or 8 h, and 1 or 2 g meropenem every 8 h dosed as an extended 3-h infusion were simulated over 48 h by using a one-compartment in vitro dynamic infection model. Serial bacterial counts were performed to quantify the pharmacodynamic effect. Population analysis profiles (PAPs) were used to assess the emergence of polymyxin B resistance. Monotherapy was ineffective against both isolates. Polymyxin B with rifampin demonstrated early bactericidal activity against the PBs isolate, followed by regrowth by 48 h. Bactericidal activity was sustained at all polymyxin B concentrations of 2 mg/liter in combination with meropenem. No two-drug combinations were effective against the PBr isolate, but all simulated triple-drug regimens showed early bactericidal activity against both strains by 8 h that was sustained over 48 h. PAPs did not reveal the emergence of resistant subpopulations. The triple-drug combination of polymyxin B, rifampin, and meropenem may be a viable consideration for the treatment of PBr KPC-producing K. pneumoniae infections. Further investigation is warranted to optimize triple-combination therapy.
PubMedId: 27872078
Journal-article: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, vol. 61, 2016
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Akshay Manohar, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Ulrike MacDonald, Jessica Graham, Timothy C Umland
Keywords: Acinetobacter baumannii Gram-negative bacilli antibiotic target bacterial drug target drug discovery essential genes multidrug resistant
Abstract: Identification and validation is the first phase of target-based antimicrobial development. BfmR (RstA), a response regulator in a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) in Acinetobacter baumannii, is an intriguing potential antimicrobial target. A unique characteristic of BfmR is that its inhibition would have the dual benefit of significantly decreasing in vivo survival and increasing sensitivity to selected antimicrobials. Studies on the clinically relevant strain AB307-0294 have shown BfmR to be essential in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype in strains AB307-0294 and AB908 is mediated, in part, by enabling growth in human ascites fluid and serum. Further, BfmR conferred resistance to complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was independent of capsular polysaccharide. Importantly, BfmR also increased resistance to the clinically important antimicrobials meropenem and colistin. BfmR was highly conserved among A.baumannii strains. The crystal structure of the receiver domain of BfmR was determined, lending insight into putative ligand binding sites. This enabled an in silico ligand binding analysis and a blind docking strategy to assess use as a potential druggable target. Predicted binding hot spots exist at the homodimer interface and the phosphorylation site. These data support pursuing the next step in the development process, which includes determining the degree of inhibition needed to impact growth/survival and the development a BfmR activity assay amenable to high-throughput screening for the identification of inhibitors. Such agents would represent a new class of antimicrobials active against A.baumannii which could be active against other Gram-negative bacilli that possess a TCS with shared homology. IMPORTANCE Increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, particularly Gram-negative bacilli, has significantly affected the ability of physicians to treat infections, with resultant increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. In fact, some strains of bacteria are resistant to all available antibiotics, such as Acinetobacter baumannii, which is the focus of this report. Therefore, the development of new antibiotics active against these resistant strains is urgently needed. In this study, BfmR is further validated as an intriguing target for a novel class of antibiotics. Successful inactivation of BfmR would confer the multiple benefits of a decreased ability of A.baumannii to survive in human body fluids, increased sensitivity to complement-mediated bactericidal activity and, importantly, increased sensitivity to other antibiotics. Structural studies support the potential for this "druggable" target, as they identify the potential for small-molecule binding at functionally relevant sites. Next-phase high-throughput screening studies utilizing BfmR are warranted.
PubMedId: 27303741
Journal-article: mSphere, vol. 1, 2016
Authors: Laura R Marks, Hema Dodd, Thomas A Russo, Charles S Berenson
Abstract: Burkholderia ginsengisoli is a non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that ordinarily serves as a plant endosymbiont. We report the first case of human infection with B. ginsengisoli presenting as bacteraemia in a young man with severe Crohn's disease. Definitive identification of the pathogen could not be accomplished with conventional techniques and required DNA sequencing. The bacteraemia may have been related to ingestion of organic vegetables and compromised gastrointestinal mucosa, coupled with treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors. Although there are no standard antibiotics to treat this pathogen, we devised a successful treatment regimen.
PubMedId: 26912763
Journal-article: BMJ case reports, vol. 2016, 2016
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Ruth Olson, Ulrike MacDonald, Janet Beanan, Bruce A Davidson
Abstract: The siderophore aerobactin is the dominant siderophore produced by hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) and was previously shown to be a major virulence factor in systemic infection. However, strains of hvKP commonly produce the additional siderophores yersiniabactin, salmochelin, and enterobactin. The roles of these siderophores in hvKP infection have not been optimally defined. To that end, site-specific gene disruptions were created in hvKP1 (wild type), resulting in the generation of hvKP1iucA (aerobactin deficient), hvKP1iroB (salmochelin deficient), hvKP1entB (enterobactin and salmochelin deficient), hvKP1irp2 (yersiniabactin deficient), and hvKP1entBirp2 (enterobactin, salmochelin, and yersiniabactin deficient). The growth/survival of these constructs was compared to that of their wild-type parent hvKP1 ex vivo in human ascites fluid, human serum, and human urine and in vivo in mouse systemic infection and pulmonary challenge models. Interestingly, in contrast to aerobactin, the inability to produce enterobactin, salmochelin, or yersiniabactin individually or in combination did not decrease the ex vivo growth/survival in human ascites or serum or decrease virulence in the in vivo infection models. Surprisingly, none of the siderophores increased growth in human urine. In human ascites fluid supplemented with exogenous siderophores, siderophores increased the growth of hvKP1iucA, with the relative activity being enterobactin > aerobactin > yersiniabactin > salmochelin, suggesting that the contribution of aerobactin to virulence is dependent on both innate biologic activity and quantity produced. Taken together, these data confirm and extend a role for aerobactin as a critical virulence factor for hvKP. Since it appears that aerobactin production is a defining trait of hvKP strains, this factor is a potential antivirulence target.
PubMedId: 26056379
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 83, 2015
Authors: J.A. Vallejo, A. Beceiro, S. Rumbo-Feal, M.J. Rodr??guez-Palero, T.A. Russo, G. Bou
Journal-article: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 2015
Authors: Kristin A Sutton, Jennifer Breen, Ulrike MacDonald, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Thomas A Russo, L Wayne Schultz, Timothy C Umland
Keywords: Acinetobacter baumannii antibiotic target enzyme kinetics essential gene ligand-induced conformational change multi-drug and extreme drug resistance shikimate kinase
Abstract: Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections exhibiting high mortality rates. Clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii strains are increasingly being observed. Compounding this concern is the dearth of new antibacterial agents in late-stage development that are effective against MDR and XDR A. baumannii. As part of an effort to address these concerns, two genes (aroA and aroC) of the shikimate pathway have previously been determined to be essential for the growth and survival of A. baumannii during host infection (i.e. to be essential in vivo). This study expands upon these results by demonstrating that the A. baumannii aroK gene, encoding shikimate kinase (SK), is also essential in vivo in a rat soft-tissue infection model. The crystal structure of A. baumannii SK in complex with the substrate shikimate and a sulfate ion that mimics the binding interactions expected for the -phosphate of ATP was then determined to 1.91 resolution and the enzyme kinetics were characterized. The flexible shikimate-binding domain and LID region are compared with the analogous regions in other SK crystal structures. The impact of structural differences and sequence divergence between SKs from pathogenic bacteria that may influence antibiotic-development efforts is discussed.
PubMedId: 26249354
Journal-article: Acta crystallographica. Section D, Biological crystallography, vol. 71, 2015
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Brad Spellberg, James R Johnson
Keywords: antimicrobial resistance antimicrobial targets antivirulence therapy microbiome resistance selection virulence factors
Abstract: Use of antivirulence therapy has assumed that inhibition of bacterial fitness at the site of infection without directly affecting viability will minimize the development of resistance. However, selection for resistant strains is much more likely to occur at sites of colonization or in the environment following excretion of the therapeutic agent. Data are needed regarding whether the drug's target promotes fitness among bacteria in (drug-exposed) niches other than sites of infection. Furthermore, in vivo studies of resistance selection should assess off-target selection for resistance (eg, within the microbiome). Only when such data are available can the risk for development of resistance be gauged appropriately.
PubMedId: 26563238
Journal-article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 213, 2015
Authors: Kristin A Sutton, Jennifer Breen, Thomas A Russo, L Wayne Schultz, Timothy C Umland
Keywords: Acinetobacter baumannii EPSP synthase antibiotic targets essential genes multidrug resistance shikimate pathway
Abstract: The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase catalyzes the sixth step of the seven-step shikimate pathway. Chorismate, the product of the pathway, is a precursor for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, siderophores and metabolites such as folate, ubiquinone and vitamin K. The shikimate pathway is present in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and apicomplexan parasites, but is absent in humans. The EPSP synthase enzyme produces 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate and phosphate from phosphoenolpyruvate and shikimate 3-phosphate via a transferase reaction, and is the target of the herbicide glyphosate. The Acinetobacter baumannii gene encoding EPSP synthase, aroA, has previously been demonstrated to be essential during host infection for the growth and survival of this clinically important drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogen. Prephenate dehydrogenase is also encoded by the bifunctional A. baumannii aroA gene, but its activity is dependent upon EPSP synthase since it operates downstream of the shikimate pathway. As part of an effort to evaluate new antimicrobial targets, recombinant A. baumannii EPSP (AbEPSP) synthase, comprising residues Ala301-Gln756 of the aroA gene product, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure, determined to 2.37 resolution, is described in the context of a potential antimicrobial target and in comparison to EPSP synthases that are resistant or sensitive to the herbicide glyphosate.
PubMedId: 26919521
Journal-article: Acta crystallographica. Section F, Structural biology communications, vol. 72, 2015
Authors: Andrew M. Gulick, Thomas A. Russo, L. W. Schulz, Timothy C. Umland
Report: 2014
Authors: Payal K Patel, Thomas A Russo, Adolf W Karchmer
Keywords: Klebsiella pneumoniae hypermucoviscous hypervirulence virulence factors
Abstract: Hypervirulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae are associated with abscess formation, commonly hepatic, and metastatic spread, even in healthy patients. We describe a case of this clinical syndrome, genotypic and phenotypic features of the isolate, and briefly review epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and pathogenesis of this underappreciated syndrome.
PubMedId: 25734101
Journal-article: Open forum infectious diseases, vol. 1, 2014
Authors: T. A. Russo, R. Olson, U. MacDonald, D. Metzger, L. M. Maltese, E. J. Drake, A. M. Gulick
PubMedId: 24664504
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 82, pp. 2356-2367, 2014
Authors: Timothy C Umland, L Wayne Schultz, Thomas A Russo
Keywords: Acinetobacter baumannii Gram-negative bacilli antibiotic target bacterial drug target essential genes multidrug resistant
PubMedId: 25405880
Journal-article: Future Microbiology, vol. 9, pp. 1113-1116, 2014
Authors: Alyssa S Shon, Rajinder P S Bajwa, Thomas A Russo
Keywords: Klebsiella pneumoniae diagnosis epidemiology hypermucoviscous hypervirulent infection pathogenesis treatment virulence factors
Abstract: A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged. First described in the Asian Pacific Rim, it now increasingly recognized in Western countries. Defining clinical features are the ability to cause serious, life-threatening community-acquired infection in younger healthy hosts, including liver abscess, pneumonia, meningitis and endophthalmitis and the ability to metastatically spread, an unusual feature for enteric Gram-negative bacilli in the non-immunocompromised. Despite infecting a healthier population, significant morbidity and mortality occurs. Although epidemiologic features are still being defined, colonization, particularly intestinal colonization, appears to be a critical step leading to infection. However the route of entry remains unclear. The majority of cases described to date are in Asians, raising the issue of a genetic predisposition vs. geospecific strain acquisition. The traits that enhance its virulence when compared with "classical" K. pneumoniae are the ability to more efficiently acquire iron and perhaps an increase in capsule production, which confers the hypermucoviscous phenotype. An objective diagnostic test suitable for routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is needed. If/when these strains become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials, we will be faced with a frightening clinical scenario.
PubMedId: 23302790
Journal-article: Virulence, vol. 4, 2013
Authors: Andrew M. Gulick, Thomas A. Russo, L. W. Schultz, Timothy C. Umland
Report: 2013
Authors: Thomas A. Russo, Janet M. Beanan, Ruth Olson, Ulrike MacDonald, Andrew D. Cox, Frank St. Michael, Evgeny V. Vinogradov, Brad Spellberg, Nicole R. Luke-Marshall, Anthony A. Campagnari
Abstract: The emergence of extremely resistant and panresistant Gram-negative bacilli, such as Acinetobacter baumannii, requires consideration of nonantimicrobial therapeutic approaches. The goal of this report was to evaluate the K1 capsular polysaccharide from A. baumannii as a passive immunization target. Its structure was determined by a combination of mass spectrometric and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Molecular mimics that might raise the concern for autoimmune disease were not identified. Immunization of CD1 mice demonstrated that the K1 capsule is immunogenic. The monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13D6, which is directed against the K1 capsule from A. baumannii, was used to determine the seroprevalence of the K1 capsule in a collection of 100 A. baumannii strains. Thirteen percent of the A. baumannii isolates from this collection were seroreactive to MAb 13D6. Opsonization of K1-positive strains, but not K1-negative strains, with MAb 13D6 significantly increased neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity in vitro (P < 0.05). Lastly, treatment with MAb 13D6 3 and 24 h after bacterial challenge in a rat soft tissue infection model resulted in a significant decrease in the growth/survival of a K1-positive strain compared to that of a K1-negative strain or to treatment with a vehicle control (P < 0.0001). These data support the proof of principle that the K1 capsule is a potential therapeutic target via passive immunization. Other serotypes require assessment, and pragmatic challenges exist, such as the need to serotype infecting strains and utilize serotype-specific therapy. Nonetheless, this approach may become an important therapeutic option with increasing antimicrobial resistance and a diminishing number of active antimicrobials.
PubMedId: 23297385
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 81, pp. 915-922, 2013
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Steven R Gill
Abstract: Hypervirulent variants of Klebsiella pneumoniae have been primarily reported in the Asian Pacific Rim, but they are spreading across the globe. We report the sequence of K. pneumoniae strain hvKP1, which caused liver-splenic abscesses in an otherwise healthy 24-year-old from Buffalo, NY, which will assist in determining why these variants are more pathogenic than "classic" K.pneumoniae strains.
PubMedId: 23516199
Journal-article: Genome announcements, vol. 1, 2013
Authors: James R Johnson, Thomas A Russo, Sarah M Drawz, Connie Clabots, Ruth Olson, Michael A Kuskowski, Henry Rosen
Keywords: Clonal Group A Escherichia coli infections Extra-urinary infections OxyR Urinary tract infections Virulence
Abstract: The oxidative stress response regulator OxyR was assessed as both a urinary and extra-urinary virulence factor in Escherichia coli strain UCB34 (O17:K+:H18), a representative of the emergent Clonal Group A (CGA). Compared to UCB34, the isogenic oxyR mutant exhibited increased H2O2 sensitivity, indistinguishable invitro growth, and attenuated virulence in rodent models of urinary tract, subcutaneous infection, and systemic sepsis. Complemented mutants showed virulence levels comparable to parent strains in all models. These findings uniquely fulfill molecular Koch's postulates for a putative virulence factor of CGA, provide experimental evidence of an extra-urinary virulence promoting trait in CGA, and document a role for OxyR in local and systemic extra-urinary E.coli infections.
PubMedId: 23850958
Journal-article: Microbial pathogenesis, vol. 64, 2013
Authors: Qingli Kong, Janet M. Beanan, Ruth Olson, Ulrike MacDonald, Alyssa S. Shon, Daniel J. Metzger, Alexander O. Pomakov, Thomas A. Russo
Abstract: A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) clinical variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) has emerged over the last decade. Our goal is to identify new mechanisms, which increase the virulence hvKP. It has been shown that hvKP strains produce more biofilm than "classical" stains of K. pneumoniae, therefore we hypothesized that biofilm formation may contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic infection. To test this hypothesis, transposon mutants of the model pathogen hvKP1 were generated and screened for decreased production of biofilm. Three mutant constructs with disruptions in glnA [putatively encodes glutamine synthetase, hvKP1 glnA:: EZ::TN < KAN-2 > (glnA::Tn)], sucD [putatively encodes succinyl-CoA synthase subunit, hvKP1 sucD:: EZ::TN < KAN-2 > (sucD::Tn)], and tag [putatively encodes transcriptional antiterminator of glycerol uptake operon, hvKP1 tag:: EZ::TN < KAN-2 > (tag::Tn)] were chosen for further characterization and use in biologic studies. Quantitative assays performed in rich laboratory medium and human ascites confirmed the phenotype and a hypermucoviscosity assay established that capsule production was not affected. However, compared with its wild-type parent, neither planktonic cells nor biofilms of glnA::Tn, sucD::Tn and tag::Tn displayed a change to the bactericidal activity of 90% human serum. Likewise, when assessed in a rat subcutaneous abscess model, the growth and survival of glnA::Tn, sucD::Tn and tag::Tn in abscess fluid was similar to hvKP1. In this report we identify three new genes that contribute to biofilm formation in hvKP1. However, decreased biofilm production due to disruption of these genes does not affect the sensitivity of these mutant constructs to 90% human serum when in planktonic form or within a biofilm. Further, their virulence in an in vivo abscess model was unaffected.
PubMedId: 22546898
Journal-article: Virulence, vol. 3, pp. 309-318, 2012
Authors: Alyssa S Shon, Thomas A Russo
PubMedId: 22702521
Journal-article: Future microbiology, vol. 7, 2012
Authors: Timothy C Umland, L Wayne Schultz, Ulrike MacDonald, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Thomas A Russo
Abstract: A critical feature of a potential antimicrobial target is the characteristic of being essential for growth and survival during host infection. For bacteria, genome-wide essentiality screens are usually performed on rich laboratory media. This study addressed whether genes detected in that manner were optimal for the identification of antimicrobial targets since the in vivo milieu is fundamentally different. Mutant derivatives of a clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii were screened for growth on human ascites, an ex vivo medium that reflects the infection environment. A subset of 34 mutants with unique gene disruptions that demonstrated little to no growth on ascites underwent evaluation in a rat subcutaneous abscess model, establishing 18 (53%) of these genes as in vivo essential. The putative gene products all had annotated biological functions, represented unrecognized or underexploited antimicrobial targets, and could be grouped into five functional categories: metabolic, two-component signaling systems, DNA/RNA synthesis and regulation, protein transport, and structural. These A. baumannii in vivo essential genes overlapped poorly with the sets of essential genes from other Gram-negative bacteria catalogued in the Database of Essential Genes (DEG), including those of Acinetobacter baylyi, a closely related species. However, this finding was not due to the absence of orthologs. None of the 18 in vivo essential genes identified in this study, or their putative gene products, were targets of FDA-approved drugs or drugs in the developmental pipeline, indicating that a significant portion of the available target space within pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria is currently neglected. The human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is of increasing clinical importance, and a growing proportion of isolates are multiantimicrobial-resistant, pan-antimicrobial-resistant, or extremely resistant strains. This scenario is reflective of the general problem of a critical lack of antimicrobials effective against antimicrobial-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter sp., and Escherichia coli. This study identified a set of A. baumannii genes that are essential for growth and survival during infection and demonstrated the importance of using clinically relevant media and in vivo validation while screening for essential genes for the purpose of developing new antimicrobials. Furthermore, it established that if a gene is absent from the Database of Essential Genes, it should not be excluded as a potential antimicrobial target. Lastly, a new set of high-value potential antimicrobial targets for pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria has been identified.
PubMedId: 22911967
Journal-article: mBio, vol. 3, 2012
Authors: Thomas A. Russo, Paul R. Knight
Book-chapter: Essence of Anesthesia Practice, pp. 314, 2011
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Alyssa S Shon, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Ulrike MacDonald, Alexander O Pomakov, Mark P Visitacion
Abstract: A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) clinical variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) has emerged over the last decade. Our goal is to identify new mechanisms, which increase the virulence hvKP compared to "classic" K. pneumoniae (cKP). Various growth assays were performed in human ascites, human serum, and laboratory medium with the hvKP strain hvKP1 (wt), randomly chosen blood isolates of cKP strains (cKP1-4), and mutant constructs deficient in the secretion of selected compounds. An in vivo mouse model that mimics infection due to hvKP and a quantitative siderophore assay were also used. It was established that a molecule(s)/factor(s) was secreted by hvKP1 significantly enhanced its growth and/or survival in human ascites. This molecule(s)/factor(s) also increased the growth and/or survival of hvKP1 in serum ex vivo and in an in vivo mouse model that measures metastatic spread after subcutaneous challenge, thereby further establishing biologic significance. Although features such as a size of <3kD, heat stability, and growth characteristics in ascites suggested this molecule(s) was a quorum-sensing compound, data presented demonstrates that this molecule(s)/factor(s) is involved in iron uptake and is likely a siderophore(s) or another iron-acquisition molecule. Although it is known that iron acquisition is critical for virulence, a novel aspect of this observation is that hvKP1 produces quantitatively more siderophores that appear to be biologically more active (increased affinity for iron or more resistant to host factors) than those produced by cKP strains. The data presented delineates a new mechanism by which hvKP increases its pathogenic potential compared to cKP strains. This paradigm may be broadly applicable to other extraintestinal gram-negative bacilli.
PubMedId: 22039542
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 6, 2011
Authors: D K Pomakova, C-B Hsiao, J M Beanan, R Olson, U MacDonald, Y Keynan, T A Russo
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to increase awareness, gain insight into acquisition, and assess the virulence of the hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) clinical variant (hvKP) that is entrenched in the Pacific Rim but emerging in Western countries. A case of community-acquired liver abscess with metastatic spread to the spleen is described. Comparative in vitro and in vivo virulence studies on this isolate (hvKP1) and four randomly chosen blood isolates of "classic" K. pneumonia strains (cKP1-4) were performed. Cases of hvKP infection are occurring in Western countries and are under-recognized. A hypermucoviscous phenotype is a surrogate laboratory marker for this variant. The propensity of hvKP strains for metastatic spread in non-compromised hosts is both a defining and unusual trait. The mode of acquisition in the described case was unclear but potential means are discussed. hvKP1 was more resistant to complement and neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity and was more virulent in a rat subcutaneous abscess model than cKP1-4. Recognition of the hypermucoviscous phenotype, defined by a positive "string-test", will alert the microbiologist or clinician that the infecting strain may be a hvKP, which is hypervirulent compared to cKP. This will improve our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of infection, which may be more extensive than appreciated.
PubMedId: 21918907
Journal-article: European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 31, 2011
Authors: Guanpingshen Luo, Lin Lin, Ashraf S Ibrahim, Beverlie Baquir, Paul Pantapalangkoor, Robert A Bonomo, Yohei Doi, Mark D Adams, Thomas A Russo, Brad Spellberg
Abstract: Extreme-drug-resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii is a rapidly emerging pathogen causing infections with unacceptably high mortality rates due to inadequate available treatment. New methods to prevent and treat such infections are a critical unmet medical need. To conduct a rational vaccine discovery program, OmpA was identified as the primary target of humoral immune response after intravenous infection by A. baumannii in mice. OmpA was >99% conserved at the amino acid level across clinical isolates harvested between 1951 and 2009 from cerebrospinal fluid, blood, lung, and wound infections, including carbapenem-resistant isolates, and was 89% conserved among other sequenced strains, but had minimal homology to the human proteome. Vaccination of diabetic mice with recombinant OmpA (rOmpA) with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant markedly improved survival and reduced tissue bacterial burden in mice infected intravenously. Vaccination induced high titers of anti-OmpA antibodies, the levels of which correlated with survival in mice. Passive transfer with immune sera recapitulated protection. Immune sera did not enhance complement-mediated killing but did enhance opsonophagocytic killing of A. baumannii. These results define active and passive immunization strategies to prevent and treat highly lethal, XDR A. baumannii infections.
PubMedId: 22253723
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 7, 2011
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Malcolm G P Page, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Andrea M Hujer, Kristine M Hujer, Michael Jacobs, Saralee Bajaksouzian, Andrea Endimiani, Robert A Bonomo
Abstract: New antibiotics that are active against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii are urgently needed. BAL30072, a siderophore monosulfactam antibiotic that rapidly penetrates the outer membrane of A. baumannii and has potent activity against most isolates, including those harbouring AmpC -lactamases and metallo- (class B) or OXA- (class D) carbapenemases, is being developed to meet that need. We assessed the in vitro activity of BAL30072, meropenem and the combination of BAL30072 and meropenem (2:1 and 1:1 ratios) by MIC and time-kill studies. Proof-of-principle in vivo efficacy was determined using a rat soft-tissue infection model. Five diverse strains with defined phenotypic and genetic profiles were tested (AB307-0294, AB8407, AB1697, AB3340 and AB0057). In microdilution assays, combining BAL30072 with meropenem lowered meropenem MICs 2-8-fold. In time-kill studies, the BAL30072 and meropenem combinations resulted in bactericidal concentrations 2-8-fold lower than those of meropenem or BAL30072 alone. In the rat model, BAL30072 was active against four of five strains (AB307-0294, AB8407, AB1697 and AB3340), including meropenem-susceptible and -non-susceptible strains. AB0057 was the only strain resistant to BAL30072 in vivo and in vitro (MIC >64 mg/L). Meropenem was active in vivo against two of the five strains tested (AB307-0294 and AB3340). Both BAL30072 and BAL30072 with meropenem were equally effective in vivo. These data support the continued evaluation of BAL30072 for use in the treatment of infections caused by MDR A. baumannii.
PubMedId: 21393224
Journal-article: The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy, vol. 66, 2011
Authors: Nicole R Luke, Shauna L Sauberan, Thomas A Russo, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Thomas W Loehfelm, Andrew D Cox, Frank St Michael, Evgeny V Vinogradov, Anthony A Campagnari
Abstract: Although Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, there have been few investigations describing the factors important for A. baumannii persistence and pathogenesis. This paper describes the first reported identification of a glycosyltransferase, LpsB, involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis in A. baumannii. Mutational, structural, and complementation analyses indicated that LpsB is a core oligosaccharide glycosyl transferase. Using a genetic approach, lpsB was compared with the lpsB homologues of several A. baumannii strains. These analyses indicated that LpsB is highly conserved among A. baumannii isolates. Furthermore, we developed a monoclonal antibody, monoclonal antibody 13C11, which reacts to an LPS core epitope expressed by approximately one-third of the A. baumannii clinical isolates evaluated to date. Previous studies describing the heterogeneity of A. baumannii LPS were limited primarily to structural analyses; therefore, studies evaluating the correlation between these surface glycolipids and pathogenesis were warranted. Our data from an evaluation of LpsB mutant 307::TN17, which expresses a deeply truncated LPS glycoform consisting of only two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid residues and lipid A, suggest that A. baumannii LPS is important for resistance to normal human serum and confers a competitive advantage for survival in vivo. These results have important implications for the role of LPS in A. baumannii infections.
PubMedId: 20194587
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 78, 2010
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Nicole R Luke, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Shauna L Sauberan, Ulrike MacDonald, L Wayne Schultz, Timothy C Umland, Anthony A Campagnari
Abstract: Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen of increasing medical importance with a propensity to be multidrug resistant, thereby making treatment challenging. Little is known of virulence traits in A. baumannii. To identify virulence factors and potential drug targets, random transposon (Tn) mutants derived from the A. baumannii strain AB307-0294 were screened to identify genes essential for growth in human ascites fluid in vitro, an inflammatory exudative fluid. These studies led to the identification of two genes that were predicted to be required for capsule polymerization and assembly. The first, ptk, encodes a putative protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), and the second, epsA, encodes a putative polysaccharide export outer membrane protein (EpsA). Monoclonal antibodies used in flow cytometric and Western analyses confirmed that these genes are required for a capsule-positive phenotype. A capsule-positive phenotype significantly optimized growth in human ascites fluid, survival in human serum, and survival in a rat soft tissue infection model. Importantly, the clearance of the capsule-minus mutants AB307.30 (ptk mutant, capsule minus) and AB307.45 (epsA mutant, capsule minus) was complete and durable. These data demonstrated that the K1 capsule from AB307-0294 was an important protectin. Further, these data suggested that conserved proteins, which contribute to the capsule-positive phenotype, are potential antivirulence drug targets. Therefore, the results from this study have important biologic and translational implications and, to the best of our knowledge, are the first to address the role of capsule in the pathogenesis of A. baumannii infection.
PubMedId: 20643860
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 78, 2010
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Ulrike MacDonald, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Ian J MacDonald, Shauna L Sauberan, Nicole R Luke, L Wayne Schultz, Timothy C Umland
Abstract: Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen of increasing medical importance. Little is known about genes important for its survival in vivo. Screening of random transposon mutants of the model pathogen AB307-0294 identified the mutant AB307.27. AB307.27 contained its transposon insertion in pbpG, which encodes the putative low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding protein 7/8 (PBP-7/8). AB307.27 was significantly killed in ascites (P<.001), but its growth in Luria-Bertani broth was similar to that of its parent, AB307-0294 (P=.13). The survival of AB307.27 was significantly decreased in a rat soft-tissue infection model (P<.001) and a rat pneumonia model (P=.002), compared with AB307-0294. AB307.27 was significantly killed in 90% human serum in vitro, compared with AB307-0294 (P<.001). Electron microscopy demonstrated more coccobacillary forms of AB307.27, compared with AB307-0294, suggesting a possible modulation in the peptidoglycan, which may affect susceptibility to host defense factors. These findings demonstrate that PBP-7/8 contributes to the pathogenesis of A. baumannii. PBP-7/8 either directly or indirectly contributes to the resistance of AB307-0294 to complement-mediated bactericidal activity. An understanding of how PBP-7/8 contributes to serum resistance will lend insight into the role of this low-molecular-mass PBP whose function is poorly understood.
PubMedId: 19143563
Journal-article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 199, 2009
Authors: Sujay Chattopadhyay, Scott J Weissman, Vladimir N Minin, Thomas A Russo, Daniel E Dykhuizen, Evgeni V Sokurenko
Abstract: Core genes comprising the ubiquitous backbone of bacterial genomes are not subject to frequent horizontal transfer and generally are not thought to contribute to the adaptive evolution of bacterial pathogens. We determined, however, that at least one-third and possibly more than one-half of the core genes in Escherichia coli genomes are targeted by repeated replacement substitutions in the same amino acid positions-hotspot mutations. Occurrence of hotspot mutations is driven by positive selection, as their rate is significantly higher than expected by random chance alone, and neither intragenic recombination nor increased mutability can explain the observed patterns. Also, commensal E. coli strains have a significantly lower frequency of mutated genes and mutations per genome than pathogenic strains. E. coli strains causing extra-intestinal infections accumulate hotspot mutations at the highest rate, whereas the highest total number of mutated genes has been found among Shigella isolates, suggesting the pathoadaptive nature of such mutations. The vast majority of hotspot mutations are of recent evolutionary origin, implying short-term positive selection, where adaptive mutations emerge repeatedly but are not sustained in natural circulation for long. Such pattern of dynamics is consistent with source-sink model of virulence evolution.
PubMedId: 19617543
Journal-article: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 106, 2009
Authors: Nimesh H Naik, Thomas A Russo
Abstract: The etiology of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw is unknown but was initially postulated to be mediated by bisphosphonate accumulation within the jaws, resulting in avascular necrosis. Bisphosphonates may not be the primary cause. Actinomyces are an underrecognized agent in pathogenesis, and timely actinomycosis-specific treatment may improve outcome.
PubMedId: 19886792
Journal-article: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 49, 2009
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Ulrike Carlino-MacDonald
Abstract: Infections outside of the intestinal tract due to pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli result in significant morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. The ability of these strains to cause both mucosal and systemic infections, as well as recurrent infections due to the same (homologous) strain suggests the hypothesis that strains of E. coli that cause infection outside of the intestinal tract possess proteases that are capable of cleaving IgA1, IgA2, sIgA or IgG. To test this hypothesis the ability of eight E. coli strains, isolated from sites outside of the urinary tract and 14 homologous and 11 heterologous strains of E. coli that were isolated from women with recurrent UTI, to cleave IgA1, IgA2, sIgA or IgG was evaluated. Our experimental design allowed for detection of cell-associated and secreted immunoglobulin proteases in both log and stationary phase. Surprisingly, none of these 33 human clinical isolates when grown in iron depleted Luria-Bertani medium or human urine were able to degrade the immunoglobulins assessed. Despite previous studies suggesting otherwise, the findings from this study support the concept that strains of E. coli that cause infection outside of the intestinal tract do not possess proteases that cleave the human immunoglobulins IgA1, IgA2, sIgA or IgG.
PubMedId: 18384367
Journal-article: FEMS immunology and medical microbiology, vol. 53, 2008
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Ulrike MacDonald, John J Cope
Abstract: Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) cause a wide variety of infections that are responsible for significant morbidity, mortality and costs to our healthcare system. An efficacious vaccine against ExPEC would be desirable. Previously, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with a genetically engineered strain in which capsule and O-antigen are no longer expressed (CP923) was immunogenic, generated antibodies that bound a subset of heterologous ExPEC strains, and enhanced neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous and a heterologous strain in vitro. In the work reported here we tested the hypothesis that nasal immunization with CP923 conferred protection in a mouse intravenous sepsis model. Nasal immunization with the wild-type strain CP9 conferred protection against challenge with itself and this protection was enhanced when IL-12 was used as an adjuvant. However, when CP923 was used the immunogen, protection was not observed against challenge with CP9. Next, we hypothesized that the observed lack of protection may be due to capsule and the O-antigen moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) impeding antibody binding to non-capsule and O-antigen epitopes. This hypothesis was substantiated by in vitro binding assays, which demonstrated that binding of polyclonal anti-CP923 antisera was decreased when capsule and/or O-antigen were present. Lastly, neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity against CP923, opsonisized with anti-CP923 antisera, was significantly increased compared to CP9. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the capsule and O-antigen form a biologically significant barrier against antibodies directed against non-capsular and O-antigen epitopes. This defense against the acquired immune response will need to be overcome for the development of a successful vaccine against ExPEC.
PubMedId: 19014988
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 27, 2008
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Ulrike MacDonald, Nicole R Luke, Steven R Gill, Anthony A Campagnari
Abstract: Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen of increasing medical importance. Little is known about its mechanisms of pathogenesis, and safe reliable agents with predictable activity against A. baumannii are presently nonexistent. The availability of relevant animal infection models will facilitate the study of Acinetobacter biology. In this report we tested the hypothesis that the rat pneumonia and soft-tissue infection models that our laboratory had previously used for studies of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli were clinically relevant for A. baumannii. Advantages of these models over previously described models were that the animals were not rendered neutropenic and they did not receive porcine mucin with bacterial challenge. Using the A. baumannii model pathogen 307-0294 as the challenge pathogen, the pneumonia model demonstrated all of the features of infection that are critical for a clinically relevant model: namely, bacterial growth/clearance, an ensuing host inflammatory response, acute lung injury, and, following progressive bacterial proliferation, death due to respiratory failure. We were also able to demonstrate growth of 307-0294 in the soft-tissue infection model. Next we tested the hypothesis that the soft-tissue infection model could be used to discriminate between the inherent differences in virulence of various A. baumannii clinical isolates. The ability of A. baumannii to grow and/or be cleared in this model was dependent on the challenge strain. We also hypothesized that complement is an important host factor in protecting against A. baumannii infection in vivo. In support of this hypothesis was the observation that the serum sensitivity of various A. baumannii clinical isolates in vitro roughly paralleled their growth/clearance in the soft-tissue infection model in vivo. Lastly we hypothesized that the soft-tissue infection model would serve as an efficient screening mechanism for identifying gene essentiality for drug discovery. Random mutants of 307-0294 were initially screened for lack of growth in human ascites in vitro. Selected mutants were subsequently used for challenge in the soft-tissue infection model to determine if the disrupted gene was essential for growth in vivo. Using this approach, we have been able to successfully identify a number of genes essential for the growth of 307-0294 in vivo. In summary, these models are clinically relevant and can be used to study the innate virulence of various Acinetobacter clinical isolates and to assess potential virulence factors, vaccine candidates, and drug targets in vivo and can be used for pharmacokinetic and chemotherapeutic investigations.
PubMedId: 18541654
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 76, 2008
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Zhengdong Wang, Bruce A Davidson, Stacy A Genagon, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Bruce A Holm, Paul R Knight, Patricia R Chess, Robert H Notter
Abstract: This study tests the hypothesis that the virulence factor hemolysin (Hly) expressed by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli contributes to surfactant dysfunction and lung injury in a rat model of gram-negative pneumonia. Rats were instilled intratracheally with CP9 (wild type, Hly-positive), CP9hlyA (Hly-minus), CP9/pEK50 (supraphysiological Hly), or purified LPS. At 6 h postinfection, rats given CP9 had a decreased percentage content of large surfactant aggregates in cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), decreased large aggregate surface activity, decreased Pa(O2)/FiO2) ratio, increased BAL albumin/protein levels, and increased histological evidence of lung injury compared with rats given CP9hlyA or LPS. In addition, rats given CP9/pEK50 or CP9 had decreased large aggregate surface activity, decreased Pa(O2)/FiO2) ratios, and increased BAL albumin/protein levels at 2 h postinfection compared with rats given CP9hlyA. The severity of permeability lung injury based on albumin/protein levels in BAL at 2 h was ordered as CP9/pEK50 > CP9 > CP9hlyA > normal saline controls. Total lung titers of bacteria were increased at 6 h in rats given CP9 vs. CP9hlyA, but bacterial titers were not significantly different at 2 h, indicating that increased surfactant dysfunction and lung injury were associated with Hly as opposed to bacterial numbers per se. Further studies in vitro showed that CP9 could directly lyse transformed pulmonary epithelial cells (H441 cells) but that indirect lysis of H441 cells secondary to Hly-induced neutrophil lysis did not occur. Together, these data demonstrate that Hly is an important direct mediator of surfactant dysfunction and lung injury in gram-negative pneumonia.
PubMedId: 17341765
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology, vol. 292, 2007
Authors: Helen Nazareth, Stacy A Genagon, Thomas A Russo
Abstract: Extracellular pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains are common causes of a variety of clinical syndromes, including urinary tract infections, abdominal infections, nosocomial pneumonia, neonatal meningitis, and sepsis. ExPEC strains are extracellular bacterial pathogens; therefore, the innate immune response (e.g., professional phagocytes) plays a crucial role in the host defense against them. Studies using the model ExPEC strain CP9 demonstrated that it is relatively resistant to neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity. Although this could be due to resistance to phagocytosis, the ability of CP9 to survive the intracellular killing mechanisms of neutrophils is another possibility. Using a variation of the intracellular invasion assay, we studied the survival of CP9 within peripheral blood-derived human neutrophils. Our results indicated that CP9 did survive within human neutrophils, but we were unable to demonstrate that intracellular replication occurred. This finding was not unique to CP9, since when a conservative assessment of survival was used, four of six additional ExPEC strains, but not an E. coli laboratory strain, were also capable of survival within neutrophils. Initial studies in which we began to decipher the mechanisms by which CP9 is able to successfully survive intracellular neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity demonstrated that CP9 was at least partially susceptible to the neutrophil oxidative burst. Therefore, absolute resistance to the oxidative burst is not a mechanism by which ExPEC survives within neutrophils. In addition, electron microscopy studies showed that CP9 appeared to be present in phagosomes within neutrophils. Therefore, avoidance of phagosomal uptake or subsequent escape from the phagosome does not appear to be a mechanism that contributes to CP9's survival. These findings suggest that survival of ExPEC within neutrophils may be an important virulence mechanism.
PubMedId: 17296761
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 75, 2007
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Bruce A Davidson, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Bruce A Holm, Robert H Notter, Paul R Knight
Abstract: Gram-negative pneumonia results in significant morbidity, mortality, and cost to the healthcare system. Previously the authors demonstrated that capsule and O-antigen, virulence factors of the extraintestinal Escherichia coli isolate CP9, modulate pulmonary neutrophil influx in a rat pneumonia model. In this report, the authors utilized CP9 and mutants deficient in O-antigen (CP921), capsule (CP9.137), or both (CP923) to test the hypothesis that modulation of cytokine levels by capsule and/or O-antigen may be a contributory mechanism. Effects of capsule and O-antigen on cytokine levels in rats in vivo and in isolated pulmonary macrophages in vitro were assessed. In vivo, capsule and O-antigen had no significant effect on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), but both were associated with significant increases in the levels of interleukin (IL)-1beta and Cytokine-induced neutrophil Chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1). However, potential difficulties in interpreting data occurred because challenge bacterial strains exhibited differential growth, and clearance characteristics and mixed cell populations were present. Therefore, added mechanistic studies investigated specific interactions of capsule and O-antigen with pulmonary macrophages purified from normal rats and exposed to CP9, CP921, CP9.137, or CP923 in vitro. Results indicated that the presence of capsule led to significantly increased levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and CINC-1, whereas O-antigen significantly decreased macrophage-associated levels of these mediators. These findings support the hypothesis that CP9 capsule is proinflammatory for macrophage-induced neutrophil recruitment, whereas O-antigen attenuates macrophage production of proinflammatory mediators in pneumonia. These results expand our understanding on the mechanisms by which these virulence traits may contribute to the inflammatory pathogenesis of pneumonia.
PubMedId: 17849261
Journal-article: Experimental lung research, vol. 33, 2007
Authors: Thomas A Russo, James R Johnson
Abstract: Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) cause a wide variety of infections that are responsible for significant morbidity, mortality and costs to our healthcare system. Thereby, the development of an efficacious ExPEC vaccine will minimize disease and may be cost-effective in selected patient groups. Surface polysaccharides, such as capsule, have been traditional targets for vaccine development. Considering that significant antigenic heterogeneity exists among surface polysaccharides present in various ExPEC strains, their use as vaccine candidates will be challenging. Therefore, alternative vaccine candidates/approaches are being identified and evaluated and are discussed in this review. The authors envision that an efficacious ExPEC vaccine will consist of either a polyvalent subunit vaccine or a genetically engineered killed whole-cell vaccine.
PubMedId: 16451107
Journal-article: Expert review of vaccines, vol. 5, 2006
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Stacy A Genagon, Ulrike MacDonald, John J Cope, Bruce A Davidson, Brian Johnston, James R Johnson
Abstract: Infections due to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) result in significant morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. An efficacious vaccine against ExPEC would be desirable. In this report, we explore the use of killed-whole E. coli as a vaccine immunogen. Given the diversity of capsule and O-antigens in ExPEC, we have hypothesized that alternative targets are viable vaccine candidates. We have also hypothesized that immunization with a genetically engineered strain that is deficient in the capsule and O-antigen will generate a greater immune response against antigens other than the capsular and O-antigen epitopes than a wild-type strain. Lastly, we hypothesize that mucosal immunization with killed E. coli has the potential to generate a significant immune response. In this study, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with a formalin-killed ExPEC derivative deficient in capsule and O-antigen results in a significantly greater overall humoral response compared to its wild-type derivative (which demonstrates that capsule and/or the O-antigen impede the development of an optimal humoral immune response) and a significantly greater immune response against non-capsular and O-antigen epitopes. These antibodies also bound to a subset of heterologous ExPEC strains and enhanced neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous and a heterologous strain. Taken together, these studies support the concept that formalin-killed genetically engineered ExPEC derivatives are whole cell vaccine candidates to prevent infections due to ExPEC.
PubMedId: 17306426
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 25, 2006
Authors: Brahm H Segal, Bruce A Davidson, Alan D Hutson, Thomas A Russo, Bruce A Holm, Barbara Mullan, Michael Habitzruther, Steven M Holland, Paul R Knight
Abstract: Increased reactive oxidant intermediates (ROIs) from primed leukocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acid aspiration lung injury. To evaluate the specific role of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase-derived ROIs in acid lung injury, the p47phox-/- knockout mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease was used. p47phox-/- mice developed a significantly greater alveolar neutrophilic leukocytosis compared with wild-type mice at all time points after acid injury, with the difference between genotypes being most marked at 48 h. In contrast, the p47phox-/- mice had a decreased number of macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) compared with wild-type at 48 h after acid or saline aspiration. Albumin concentration in BAL reflecting capillary leak was also greater in p47phox-/- compared with wild-type mice. BAL concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were greater in p47phox-/- compared with wild-type mice. These findings suggest that NADPH oxidase, directly or indirectly, plays a role in attenuating the acute neutrophilic response after acid lung injury. We speculate that this downmodulating effect may be mediated by promoting the transition from production of cytokines and chemokines involved in neutrophilic infiltration to a less injurious, chronic inflammatory response.
PubMedId: 17114280
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology, vol. 292, 2006
Authors: James R Johnson, Thomas A Russo
Abstract: Molecular epidemiological analyses of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), which are also called "uropathogenic E. coli" since they are the principle pathogens in urinary tract infection, involve structured observations of E. coli as they occur in the wild. Careful selection of subjects and use of appropriate methods for genotyping and statistical analysis are required for optimal results. Molecular epidemiological studies have helped to clarify the host-pathogen relationships, phylogenetic background, reservoirs, and transmission pathways of ExPEC, to assess potential vaccine candidates, and to delineate areas for further study. Ongoing discovery of new putative virulence factors (VFs), increasing awareness of the importance of VF expression and molecular variants of VFs, and growing appreciation of transmission as an important contributor to ExPEC infections provide abundant stimulus for future molecular epidemiological studies. Published by Elsevier GmbH.
PubMedId: 16238015
Journal-article: International journal of medical microbiology : IJMM, vol. 295, 2005
Authors: Bruce A Davidson, Carleton C Stewart, Thomas A Russo, Patricia R Chess, Paul R Knight
Abstract: Laser flow cytometric analysis was used in conjunction with in vivo labeling with the lipophilic fluorescent dye DiIC18(5)-DS to discriminate resident alveolar macrophages from newly infiltrating monocytes/macrophages in mice with and without pulmonary influenza A virus infection. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood were analyzed by 2-color flow cytometry as a function of time following intravenous injection of DiIC18(5)-DS. At 4 hours, dye-positive leukocytes were present in both BAL and blood of normal mice, indicating that DiIC18(5)-DS rapidly crossed the pulmonary endothelial-epithelial barrier. At 4 days after dye injection, 98% of BAL cells were DiIC18(5)-DS positive, and almost all of these were monocytes/macrophages based on labeling with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antibody to the Mac-3 marker. Only 3.2% +/- 0.3% of peripheral blood monocytes (approximately 0.16% of total peripheral blood leukocytes) were DiIC18(5)-DS positive at 6 days after injection, whereas > 95% of BAL leukocytes were strongly dye-positive on days 6 to 28. When DiIC18(5)-DS was injected in mice 6 days prior to intranasal challenge with influenza A, flow cytometry indicated that 57.8% 5.6% and 60.7% +/- 8.5% of macrophages/monocytes in BAL were newly infiltrated (i.e., DiIC18(5)-DS negative, Mac-3 positive) at 4 and 7 days, respectively, post viral infection. The discrimination of subpopulations of resident and newly recruited macrophages in BAL should facilitate future mechanistic studies on pulmonary infection and inflammatory lung injury.
PubMedId: 15962712
Journal Article: Experimental lung research, vol. 31, 2005
Authors: Bruce A. Davidson, Carleton C. Stewart, Thomas A. Russo, Patricia R. Chess, Robert H. Notter, Paul R. Knight III
Journal-article: Experimental Lung Research, vol. 31, pp. 323-339, 2005
Authors: Bruce A Davidson, Paul R Knight, Zhengdong Wang, Patricia R Chess, Bruce A Holm, Thomas A Russo, Alan Hutson, Robert H Notter
Abstract: This study examines surfactant dysfunction in rats with inflammatory lung injury from intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid (ACID, pH 1.25), small nonacidified gastric particles (SNAP), or combined acid and small gastric particles (CASP). Rats given CASP had the most severe lung injury at 6, 24, and 48 h based on decreases in arterial oxygenation and increases in erythrocytes, total leukocytes, neutrophils, total protein, and albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The content of large surfactant aggregates in BAL was reduced in all forms of aspiration injury, but decreases were greatest in rats given CASP. Large aggregates from aspiration-injured rats also had decreased levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and increased levels of lyso-PC and total protein compared with saline controls (abnormalities for CASP were greater than for SNAP or ACID alone). The surface tension-lowering ability of large surfactant aggregates on a bubble surfactometer was impaired in rats with aspiration injury at 6, 24, and 48 h, with the largest activity reductions found in animals given CASP. There were strong statistical correlations between surfactant dysfunction (increased minimum surface tension and reduced large aggregate content) and the severity of lung injury based on arterial oxygenation and levels of albumin, protein, and erythrocytes in BAL (P < 0.0001). Surfactant dysfunction also correlated strongly with reduced lung volumes during inflation and deflation (P = 0.0004-0.005). These results indicate that surfactant abnormalities are functionally important in gastric aspiration lung injury and contribute significantly to the increased severity of injury found in CASP compared with ACID or SNAP alone.
PubMedId: 15757954
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology, vol. 288, 2005
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Bruce A Davidson, Stacy A Genagon, Natalie M Warholic, Ulrike Macdonald, Patrick D Pawlicki, Janet M Beanan, Ruth Olson, Bruce A Holm, Paul R Knight
Abstract: Enteric gram-negative bacilli, such as Escherichia coli are the most common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. In this study a wild-type extraintestinal pathogenic strain of E. coli (ExPEC)(CP9) and isogenic derivatives deficient in hemolysin (Hly) and cytotoxic necrotizing factor (CNF) were assessed in vitro and in a rat model of gram-negative pneumonia to test the hypothesis that these virulence factors induce neutrophil apoptosis and/or necrosis/lysis. As ascertained by in vitro caspase-3/7 and LDH activities and neutrophil morphology, Hly mediated neutrophil apoptosis at lower E. coli titers (1 x 10(5-6) cfu) and necrosis/lysis at higher titers (> or =1 x 10(7) cfu). Data suggest that CNF promotes apoptosis but not necrosis or lysis. We also demonstrate that annexin V/7-amino-actinomycin D staining was an unreliable assessment of apoptosis using live E. coli. The use of caspase-3/7 and LDH activities and neutrophil morphology supported the notion that necrosis, not apoptosis, was the primary mechanism by which neutrophils were affected in our in vivo gram-negative pneumonia model using live E. coli. In addition, in vivo studies demonstrated that Hly mediates lung injury. Neutrophil necrosis was not observed when animals were challenged with purified lipopolysaccharide, demonstrating the importance of using live bacteria. These findings establish that Hly contributes to ExPEC virulence by mediating neutrophil toxicity, with necrosis/lysis being the dominant effect of Hly on neutrophils in vivo and by lung injury. Whether Hly-mediated lung injury is due to neutrophil necrosis, a direct effect of Hly, or both is unclear.
PubMedId: 15805136
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology, vol. 289, 2005
Authors: Krishnan Raghavendran, Bruce A Davidson, Barbara A Mullan, Alan D Hutson, Thomas A Russo, Patricia A Manderscheid, James A Woytash, Bruce A Holm, Robert H Notter, Paul R Knight
Abstract: A model of aspiration lung injury was developed in WT C57BL/6 mice to exploit genetically modified animals on this background, i.e., MCP-1(-/-) mice. Mice were given intratracheal hydrochloric acid (ACID, pH 1.25), small nonacidified gastric particles (SNAP), or combined acid plus small gastric particles (CASP). As reported previously in rats, lung injury in WT mice was most severe for "two-hit" aspiration from CASP (40 mg/ml particulates) based on the levels of albumin, leukocytes, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, MCP-1, KC, and MIP-2 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at 5, 24, and 48 h. MCP-1(-/-) mice given 40 mg/ml CASP had significantly decreased survival compared with WT mice (32% vs. 80% survival at 24 h and 0% vs. 72% survival at 48 h). MCP-1(-/-) mice also had decreased survival compared with WT mice for CASP aspirates containing reduced particulate doses of 10-20 mg/ml. MCP-1(-/-) mice given 5 mg/ml CASP had survival similar to WT mice given 40 mg/ml CASP. MCP-1(-/-) mice also had differing responses from WT mice for several inflammatory mediators in BAL (KC or IL-6 depending on the particle dose of CASP and time of injury). Histopathology of WT mice with CASP (40 mg particles/ml) showed microscopic areas of compartmentalization with prominent granuloma formation by 24 h, whereas lung tissue from MCP-1(-/-) mice had severe diffuse pneumonia without granulomas. These results indicate that MCP-1 is important for survival in murine aspiration pneumonitis and appears to act partly to protect uninjured lung regions by promoting isolation and compartmentalization of tissue with active inflammation.
PubMedId: 15778247
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology, vol. 289, 2005
Authors: P. A. Manderscheid, R. P. Bodkin, B. A. Davidson, E. Jensen, T. A. Russo, P. R. Knight
Journal-article: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, vol. 11, pp. 742-751, 2004
Authors: Alexandre T. Rotta, Kevin T. Shiley, Bruce A. Davidson, Jadwiga D. Helinski, Thomas A. Russo, Paul R. Knight
Journal-article: Critical Care Medicine, vol. 32, pp. 747-754, 2004
Authors: Alexandre T Rotta, Alla Tauber, Jadwiga D Helinski, Bruce A Davidson, Thomas A Russo, Paul R Knight
Journal-article: Critical Care Medicine, vol. 32, pp. A128, 2004
Authors: Paul R Knight, Bruce A Davidson, Nader D Nader, Jadwiga D Helinski, Cristi J Marschke, Thomas A Russo, Alan D Hutson, Robert H Notter, Bruce A Holm
Abstract: This study examines lung injury and inflammation over 24 hours following intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid (acid), small nonacidic gastric particles (SNAP), or combined acid and small particles (CASP) in adult rats. The severity and duration of injury was significantly greater for CASP compared to acid or SNAP based on PaO2/FiO2, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) albumin, and BAL cell numbers. The inflammatory response associated with aspiration injury from CASP was distinct in several respects. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was greatly reduced in CASP compared to SNAP or acid, whereas interleukin (IL)-1beta was increased. Levels of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and IL-10 in lavage were also significantly increased in animals injured with CASP compared to other forms of aspiration. Statistical analysis showed that BAL levels of IL-10 correlated most strongly with albumin leakage in aspiration-injured animals at 6 and 24 hours, followed by BAL levels of MCP-1. Additional cytokine cluster analyses indicated that levels of MCP-1 and CINC-1 in BAL from all injured animals were strongly correlated with inflammatory neutrophil numbers at 6 and 24 hours post aspiration, and that IL-10 levels in BAL were strongly correlated with inflammatory cell numbers at 24 hours. Preliminary blocking experiments showed that administration of anti-IL-10 antibody increased the albumin permeability index at 6 hours in SNAP and CASP animals, but anti-MCP-1 antibody did not affect the severity of injury. The results of this study support the possibility that different forms of aspiration are associated with identifiable cytokine profiles, and that specific cytokines, including IL-10 and MCP-1, may have utility as diagnostic or prognostic markers in clinical applications.
PubMedId: 15371091
Journal-article: Experimental lung research, vol. 30, 2004
Authors: J. R. Johnson, A. Gajewski, A. J. Lesse, T. A. Russo
Journal-article: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 41, pp. 5798-5802, 2003
Authors: T. A. Russo, C. D. McFadden, U. B. Carlino-MacDonald, J. M. Beanan, R. Olson, G. E. Wilding
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 71, pp. 7164-7169, 2003
Authors: T. A. Russo, B. A. Davidson, D. M. Topolnycky, R. Olson, S. A. Morrill, P. R. Knight, P. M. Murphy
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 71, pp. 6435-6445, 2003
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Bruce A Davidson, Ulrike B Carlino-MacDonald, Jadwiga D Helinski, Roger L Priore, Paul R Knight
Journal-article: FEMS Microbiology Letters, vol. 226, pp. 355-361, 2003
Authors: T Russo
Journal-article: Microbes and Infection, vol. 5, pp. 449-456, 2003
Authors: James??R. Johnson, Thomas??A. Russo
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 186, pp. 859-864, 2002
Authors: James R Johnson, Thomas A Russo
PubMedId: 11944026
Journal Article: The Journal of laboratory and clinical medicine, vol. 139, 2002
Authors: T. A. Russo, C. D. McFadden, U. B. Carlino-MacDonald, J. M. Beanan, T. J. Barnard, J. R. Johnson
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 70, pp. 7156-7160, 2002
Authors: Thomas A. Russo, Lori A. Bartholomew, Bruce A. Davidson, Jadwiga D. Helinski, Ulrike B. Carlino, Paul R. Knight, Michael F. Beers, Elena N. Atochina, Robert H. Notter, Bruce A. Holm
Journal-article: American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, vol. 283, pp. L655-L663, 2002
Authors: James R. Johnson, Thomas A. Russo
Journal-article: Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, vol. 139, pp. 155-162, 2002
Authors: T. A. Russo, U. B. Carlino, J. R. Johnson
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 69, pp. 6209-6216, 2001
Authors: James??R. Johnson, Timothy??T. O'Bryan, Parissa Delavari, Michael Kuskowski, Ann Stapleton, Ulrike Carlino, Thomas??A. Russo
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 183, pp. 1508-1517, 2001
Authors: James??R. Johnson, Parissa Delavari, Adam??L. Stell, Thomas??S. Whittam, Ulrike Carlino, Thomas??A. Russo
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 183, pp. 154-159, 2001
Authors: J. R. Johnson, T. T. O'Bryan, D. A. Low, G. Ling, P. Delavari, C. Fasching, T. A. Russo, U. Carlino, A. L. Stell
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 68, pp. 3327-3336, 2000
Authors: T. A. Russo, B. A. Davidson, R. L. Priore, U. B. Carlino, J. D. Helinski, P. R Knight
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 68, pp. 2854-2862, 2000
Authors: Thomas??A. Russo, James??R. Johnson
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 181, pp. 1753-1754, 2000
Authors: J. R. Johnson, A. L. Stell, F. Scheutz, T. T. O'Bryan, T. A. Russo, U. B. Carlino, C. Fasching, J. Kavle, L. van Dijk, W. Gaastra
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 68, pp. 7215-7215, 2000
Authors: J. R. Johnson, A. L. Stell, F. Scheutz, T. T. O'Bryan, T. A. Russo, U. B. Carlino, C. Fasching, J. Kavle, L. Van Dijk, W. Gaastra
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 68, pp. 1587-1599, 2000
Authors: J. R. Johnson, T. A. Russo, P. I. Tarr, U. Carlino, S. S. Bilge, J. C. Vary, A. L. Stell
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 68, pp. 3040-3047, 2000
Authors: Nicole R. Luke, Thomas A. Russo, Neal Luther, Anthony A. Campagnari
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 67, pp. 681-687, 1999
Authors: James??R. Johnson, Thomas??A. Russo, Jennifer??J. Brown, Ann Stapleton
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 177, pp. 97-101, 1998
Authors: James??R. Johnson, Jennifer??J. Brown, Ulrike??B. Carlino, Thomas??A. Russo
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 177, pp. 1120-1124, 1998
Authors: Thomas A Russo, Daniel Mylotte
Journal-article: FEMS Microbiology Letters, vol. 162, pp. 311-315, 1998
Authors: T Russo
Journal-article: FEMS Microbiology Letters, vol. 162, pp. 311-315, 1998
Authors: Thomas A. Russo, Stephen T. Jodush, Jennifer J. Brown, James R. Johnson
Journal-article: Molecular Microbiology, vol. 22, pp. 217-229, 1996
Authors: T. A. Russo, A. Stapleton, S. Wenderoth, T. M. Hooton, W. E. Stamm
Journal-article: Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 172, pp. 440-445, 1995
Authors: Thomas A. Russo, Geetika Sharma, Jerrold Weiss, Charles Brown
Journal-article: Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 18, pp. 269-278, 1995
Authors: T. A. Russo, Y. Liang, A. S. Cross
Journal-article: Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 169, pp. 112-118, 1994
Authors: T A Russo, G Singh
Journal-article: Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 175, pp. 7617-7623, 1993
Authors: Thomas A. Russo, Jane E. Guenther, Suzanne Wenderoth, Michael M. Frank
Journal-article: Molecular Microbiology, vol. 9, pp. 357-364, 1993
Authors: T A Russo, J S Thompson, V G Godoy, M H Malamy
Journal-article: Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 172, pp. 2594-2600, 1990
Authors: T A Russo, S Cook, S L Gorbach
Journal-article: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, vol. 32, pp. 1439-1440, 1988
Authors: Thomas A. Russo, Rajinder P. S. Bajwa
Book-chapter: Clinical Infectious Disease, pp. 829-834,
Presented by CUBS © 2022