UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Kris Tjaden UB Profile
Communicative Disorders and Sciences
Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs
Professor
122 Cary Hall
716)-829-2797
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
 
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Vincent Martel-Sauvageau
Publication: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, vol. 26, pp. 569-582, 2017
Authors: Vincent Martel-Sauvageau, Kris Tjaden
Publication: Journal of Communication Disorders, vol. 70, pp. 1-11, 2017
Authors: Christina Kuo, Kris Tjaden
Publication: Journal of Communication Disorders, vol. 62, pp. 30-44, 2016
Authors: Jennifer Lam, Kris Tjaden
Publication: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 59, pp. 631-646, 2016
Authors: Lynda Feenaughty, Kris Tjaden, Joan Sussman
Publication: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, vol. 28, pp. 857-878, 2014
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Alexander Kain, Jennifer Lam
Publication: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 57, pp. 1191-1205, 2014
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Joan E. Sussman, Gregory E. Wilding
Publication: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 57, pp. 779-792, 2014
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Emily Richards, Christina Kuo, Greg Wilding, Joan Sussman
Publication: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, vol. 65, pp. 214-220, 2013
Authors: Lynda Feenaughty, Kris Tjaden, Ralph H.B. Benedict, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman
Abstract: This preliminary study investigated how cognitive-linguistic status in multiple sclerosis (MS) is reflected in two speech tasks (i.e. oral reading, narrative) that differ in cognitive-linguistic demand. Twenty individuals with MS were selected to comprise High and Low performance groups based on clinical tests of executive function and information processing speed and efficiency. Ten healthy controls were included for comparison. Speech samples were audio-recorded and measures of global speech timing were obtained. Results indicated predicted differences in global speech timing (i.e. speech rate and pause characteristics) for speech tasks differing in cognitive-linguistic demand, but the magnitude of these task-related differences was similar for all speaker groups. Findings suggest that assumptions concerning the cognitive-linguistic demands of reading aloud as compared to spontaneous speech may need to be re-considered for individuals with cognitive impairment. Qualitative trends suggest that additional studies investigating the association between cognitive-linguistic and speech motor variables in MS are warranted.
PubMedId: 23294227
Journal-article: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, vol. 27, pp. 134-151, 2013
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Jennifer Lam, Greg Wilding
Publication: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 56, pp. 1485-1502, 2013
Authors: Jennifer Lam, Kris Tjaden
Publication: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 56, pp. 1429-1440, 2013
Authors: Jennifer Lam, Kris Tjaden
Publication: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, vol. 65, pp. 148-153, 2013
Authors: Jennifer Lam, Kris Tjaden, Greg Wilding
Publication: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 55, pp. 1807-1821, 2012
Authors: Joan E. Sussman, Kris Tjaden
Publication: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 55, pp. 1208-1219, 2012
Authors: Jonathan D Rodgers, Kris Tjaden, Lynda Feenaughty, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Ralph H B Benedict
Abstract: We examined cognitive predictors of speech and articulation rate in 50 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 23 healthy controls. We measured speech and articulation rate from audio-recordings of participants reading aloud and talking extemporaneously on a topic of their choice (i.e., self-generated speech). Articulation rate was calculated for each speech sample by removing lexically irrelevant vocalizations and pauses of >200 ms. Speech rate was similarly calculated including pauses. Concurrently, the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis (MACFIMS) battery, as well as standardized tests of sentence intelligibility and syllable repetition were administered. Analysis of variance showed that MS patients were slower on three of the four rate measures. Greater variance in rate measures was accounted for by cognitive variables for the MS group than controls. An information processing speed composite, as measured by the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), was the strongest predictor among cognitive tests. A composite of memory tests related to self-generated speech, above and beyond information processing speed, but not to oral reading. Self-generated speech, in this study, was not found to relate more strongly to cognitive tests than simple reading. Implications for further research are discussed.
PubMedId: 23058309
Journal-article: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, vol. 19, 2012
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Greg Wilding
Publication: Journal of Communication Disorders, vol. 44, pp. 655-665, 2011
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Greg Wilding
Publication: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, vol. 63, pp. 178-186, 2011
Authors: Kris Tjaden, Greg Wilding
Publication: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, vol. 25, pp. 155-168, 2010
Presented by CUBS © 2022