UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Kinga Szigeti UB Profile
Neurology
Associate Professor, Director of the Alzheimer's Disease and Memory Disorders Center
Dept. of Neurology
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
"1001 Main St., 4th floor"
Buffalo NY 14203
716-323-0556
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Lauren T Olson, Alan Smerbeck, Christina M Figueroa, Jeremy M Raines, Kinga Szigeti, David J Schretlen, Ralph H B Benedict
PubMedId: 33563054
1: Assessment, 2021
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Ivanna Ihnatovych, Barbara Birkaya, Ziqiang Chen, Aya Ouf, Dinesh C Indurthi, Jonathan E Bard, Julien Kann, Alexandrea Adams, Lee Chaves, Norbert Sule, Joan S Reisch, Valory Pavlik, Ralph H B Benedict, Anthony Auerbach, Gregory Wilding
PubMedId: 32818803
1: EBioMedicine, vol. 59, 2020
Authors: Ivanna Ihnatovych, Barbara Birkaya, Emily Notari, Kinga Szigeti
PubMedId: 33352944
1: International journal of molecular sciences, vol. 21, 2020
Authors: Dejan Jakimovski, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Shumita Roy, Michael Jaworski, Laura Hancock, Alissa Nizinski, Pavitra Srinivasan, Tom A. Fuchs, Kinga Szigeti, Robert Zivadinov, Ralph H. B. Benedict
PubMedId: 31133845
Journal-article: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, vol. 11, 2019
Authors: Dejan Jakimovski, Niels Bergsland, Michael G Dwyer, Jesper Hagemeier, Deepa P Ramasamy, Kinga Szigeti, Thomas Guttuso, David Lichter, David Hojnacki, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Ralph H B Benedict, Robert Zivadinov
PubMedId: 32147244
1: Neurobiology of aging, vol. 90, 2019
Authors: Matthew R. Woodward, Muhammad Ubaid Hafeez, Qianya Qi, Ahmed Riaz, Ralph H.B. Benedict, Li Yan, Kinga Szigeti
Journal-article: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2018
Authors: Shumita Roy, Allison Drake, Stephanie Snyder, Breana Cline, Anjum Khan, Tom Fuchs, Robert Zivadinov, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Kinga Szigeti, Ralph H.B. Benedict
PubMedId: 29574353
Journal-article: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, vol. 22, pp. 52-56, 2018
Authors: Ivanna Ihnatovych, Alexandra Lew, Evelyn Lazar, Anna Sheng, Timot Kellermayer, Kinga Szigeti
PubMedId: 30050576
1: Stem cells international, vol. 2018, 2017
Authors: Muhammad Ubaid Hafeez, Katherine T Mun, Haris Kamal, Kinga Szigeti
Journal-article: Journal of Aging Science, vol. 05, 2017
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Muhammad Zeb, Ahmed Riaz
Journal-article: Clinical Medicine Insights: Geriatrics, vol. 10, 2017
Authors: Matthew R. Woodward, Michael G. Dwyer, Niels Bergsland, Jesper Hagemeier, Robert Zivadinov, Ralph HB. Benedict, Kinga Szigeti
Keywords: Alzheimer's disease Amnestic mild cognitive impairment Diffusion tensor imaging MRI Olfactory White Matter
Abstract: Olfactory identification deficit (OID) has been associated with both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the context of an amnestic disorders, OID predicts conversion to AD. Neuroanatomical correlates could increase specificity and sensitivity and elucidate the mechanistic differences between OID in AD and aging. Cross-sectional analysis of white matter microstructural changes was performed using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tract-based-spatial-statistics in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), AD and normal controls (NC) in 66 subjects (26 AD, 15 aMCI, 25 NC). DTI 3-Tesla MRI scans were analyzed and subject level means for fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial and axial diffusivity (1D and 2,3D) were calculated. Linear regression models were applied using DTI markers as predictor and OID as outcome. OID was associated with increased 1D in aMCI and increased MD, 1D and 2,3D in AD. Voxel-wise analyses revealed widespread differences in all markers in AD. There were significant differences in 1D in aMCI, particularly in the olfactory tract. OID is correlated with microstructural white matter changes as early as in aMCI. This study may help elucidate the biological basis for olfactory impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Neuroanatomical correlates could help distinguish OID associated with AD and that associated with aging.
PubMedId: 28644998
Journal-article: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, vol. 266, pp. 90-95, 2017
Authors: Benjamin P. Chapman, Ralph H.B. Benedict, Feng Lin, Shumita Roy, Antoine Porteinsson, Kinga Szigeti, Howard Federoff, Mark Mapstone
Keywords: APOE attention memory personality traits
Abstract: To determine if phenotypic personality traits modify the association of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes with different domains of cognitive function. Cross-sectional. 172 non-demented older adults were administered the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), a battery of neuropsychological tests assessing memory, attention, executive function, language, and visuospatial ability, and underwent APOE genotyping. Multivariate (multiple-dependent variable) regression models predicting cognitive domains tested APOE interactions with personality traits, adjusting for age, sex, and education. The APOE 4 allele showed small to modest main effects on memory and executive function (1/3 SD deficits for carriers, p<.05), with 2 status evidencing minimal and non-significant benefit. Neuroticism interacted with both 2 and 4 alleles in associations with attention scores (p=.001), with 2 benefits and 4 deficits being marked at high Neuroticism (Mean [M] covariate-adjusted Z-score=.39 for 2, -.47 for 4). The association of 4 with memory was moderated by Conscientiousness (p<.001), such that 4 memory deficits were apparent at low Conscientiousness (M=-.56), but absent at high levels of Conscientiousness. Weaker patterns (p<.05) also suggested 4-related detriments in executive function only at lower Conscientiousness, and 2 memory benefits only at higher Openness. Conscientiousness and Neuroticism moderate APOE associations with memory and executive function. As such, they may be useful phenotypic markers in refining the prognostic significance of this polymorphism. Effect-modifying personality traits also provide clues about behavioral and psychological factors that influence the cognitive impact of APOE. Copyright 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMedId: 28612377
Journal-article: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2017
Authors: Alexandra R Lew, Timot R Kellermayer, Balint P Sule, Kinga Szigeti
PubMedId: 30258274
1: Current genomics, vol. 19, 2016
Authors: Matthew R. Woodward, Muhammad Ubaid Hafeez, Muhammad U. Khan, Jepser Hagemeier, Li Yan, Qianya Qi, Kinga Szigeti
Journal-article: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 24, pp. S100, 2016
Authors: Matthew R. Woodward, Chaitanya V. Amrutkar, Harshit C. Shah, Ralph H.B. Benedict, Sanjanaa Rajakrishnan, Rachelle S. Doody, Li Yan, Kinga Szigeti
Abstract: We evaluated smell identification as a biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD) by assessing its utility in differentiating normal aging from an amnestic disorder and determining its predictive value for conversion from amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) to AD. Cross-sectional study (AD = 262, aMCI = 110, controls = 194) measuring smell identification (University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test [UPSIT]) and cognitive status was performed, as well as longitudinal analysis of aMCI participants (n = 96) with at least 1 year follow-up (mean 477.6 223.3 days), to determine conversion by National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria. Odor identification and disease status were highly correlated after correcting for age, sex, and APOE (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC)/area under the curve (AUC) was similar for the 40-item UPSIT, the top 10 smells in our study, and the 10-item subset previously proposed. Smeller/nonsmeller based on the 10-item subset with a cutoff of 7 (7, nonsmeller; >7, smeller) had a sensitivity and specificity of 88% and 71% for identifying AD and 74% sensitivity and 71% specificity for identifying an amnestic disorder. A total of 36.4% of participants with impaired olfaction and 17.3% with intact olfaction converted to AD (p = 0.03). The ROC/AUC for prediction of conversion to AD was 0.62. Olfactory identification deficit is a useful screening tool for AD-related amnestic disorder, with sensitivity and specificity comparable to other established biomarkers, with benefits such as ease of administration and low cost. Olfactory identification deficit can be utilized to stratify risk of conversion from aMCI to AD and enrich clinical trials of disease-modifying therapy. This study provides Class III evidence that smell identification (10-item UPSIT subset) accurately identifies patients with amnestic disorders.
PubMedId: 28243501
Journal-article: Neurology: Clinical Practice, vol. 7, pp. 5-14, 2016
Authors: Shumita Roy, Stephanie Ficarro, Paul Duberstein, Benjamin P. Chapman, Steven Dubovsky, Margaret Paroski, Kinga Szigeti, Ralph H.B. Benedict
Keywords: Alzheimer disease Executive function instrumental activities of daily living mild cognitive impairment personality
Abstract: Previous research shows that executive function (EF) and personality independently predict functional decline. Our objective was to determine whether personality traits predict independence with instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), after accounting for executive dysfunction, in a mixed sample of patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD). In a cross-sectional analysis at a university medical center, 63 healthy older adults (median age: 67.6 years; 71% women) and 119 patients (median age: 75.0 years; 58% women) with varying degrees of AD (probable AD: 85; possible AD: 3; amnestic MCI: 31) were studied. Standardized neuropsychological measures, NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), and informant-report Lawton and Brody IADL scales were used. All participants underwent neuropsychological evaluation, including administration of self- and informant-report NEO-FFI. Patients additionally underwent neurologic examination, and their informants completed the Lawton and Brody IADL scale. When testing the association between EF and personality on IADLs in the patient sample, conceptual card sorting, informant-report Openness, and informant-report Conscientiousness all significantly predicted IADLs, after accounting for age, education, and depression. In addition, a significant interaction showed that low Conscientiousness and executive dysfunction, in combination, can predict impairment of IADLs. Personality has a unique association with IADLs in patients with AD pathology that is not explained by EF. The findings confirm prior speculation that personality, in addition to cognitive dysfunction, is a risk factor for functional decline. Early identification of vulnerable individuals may allow for intervention to prolong functional independence.
PubMedId: 27618644
Journal-article: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 24, pp. 1074-1083, 2016
Authors: Jesper Hagemeier, Matthew R. Woodward, Usama A. Rafique, Chaitanya V. Amrutkar, Niels Bergsland, Michael G. Dwyer, Ralph Benedict, Robert Zivadinov, Kinga Szigeti
Keywords: Alzheimer's Deep gray matter MRI Mild cognitive impairment Olfactory Smelling
Abstract: Even in early stages, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with olfactory deficit. We assess the association of volumetric differences in subcortical deep gray matter (DGM) structures and odor identification deficit (OID) in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), AD and normal controls (NCs), and relate findings to the current gold standard right sided memory measure, visual reproduction. Eighty subjects (19 aMCI; 42 CE; 19 NC) were included in this study. We obtained olfactory testing and normalized structural brain volumes from 3T T1 MRI scans. Associations between MRI, olfactory- and memory impairment were studied using Pearson- and partial-correlation adjusted for age. AD patients had significantly higher olfactory deficits, lower visual reproduction scores, and reduced brain volumes (p<0.05). Within aMCI, OID was associated with lower right hippocampal- and left amygdala volume (p<0.05). In AD, OID was associated with bilaterally lower hippocampus and left amygdala volumes. In contrast, visual reproduction was associated with bilateral volume loss regardless of study group. OID is a more specific marker of early pathological right mesial-temporal involvement than the currently regarded gold standard of right sided-memory (visual reproduction). OID may be valuable in the longitudinal evaluation of disease modifying treatments in early disease course.
PubMedId: 27567325
Journal-article: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, vol. 255, pp. 87-93, 2016
Authors: Kinga Szigeti
PubMedId: 26235076
1: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), vol. 1303, 2015
Authors: Norbert Sule, B O Xu, Dima El Zein, Kinga Szigeti, Saby George, John M Kane, Richard Cheney
PubMedId: 25964567
1: Anticancer research, vol. 35, 2015
Authors: Matthew R. Woodward, Michael G. Dwyer, Chaitanya V. Amrutkar, Robert Zivadinov, Kinga Szigeti
Journal-article: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 23, pp. S103-S104, 2015
Authors: W. Wiszniewski, K. Szigeti, J.R. Lupski
Book-chapter: Reference Module in Biomedical Sciences, 2014
Authors: K. Szigeti, B. Trummer, D. Lal, R.S. Doody, L. Yan, S. Liu, C. Ma,
Journal-article: European Journal of Inflammation, vol. 12, pp. 267-276, 2014
Authors: K. Reimers, N. Emmert, H. Shah, R. H. B. Benedict, K. Szigeti
PubMedId: 25566416
Journal-article: Neurology: Clinical Practice, vol. 4, pp. 467-469, 2014
Authors: Karen Reimers, Natalie Emmert, Ralph Benedict, Kinga Szigeti
Journal-article: Alzheimer's & Dementia, vol. 9, pp. P866, 2013
Authors: Mark Jensen, Alexander P Cox, Naveed Chaudhry, Marcus Ng, Donat Sule, William Duncan, Patrick Ray, Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, Barry Smith, Alan Ruttenberg, Kinga Szigeti, Alexander D Diehl
Abstract: We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data pertaining to neurological diseases. ND will enable its users to connect data in a robust way with related data that is annotated using other terminologies and ontologies in the biomedical domain.
PubMedId: 24314207
Journal-article: J Biomed Sem, vol. 4, pp. 42, 2013
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Brian Trummer, Deepika Lal, Li Yan, Liu Song, Rachelle Doody
Journal-article: Alzheimer's & Dementia, vol. 9, pp. P176-P177, 2013
Authors: Wojciech Wiszniewski, Kinga Szigeti, James R. Lupski
Book-chapter: Emery and Rimoin's Principles and Practice of Medical Genetics, pp. 1-24, 2013
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Yanchun Li, Chad Shaw, Irene Sheffer, Norbert Sule, Suzanne Powell, Noman Zaidi, James Lupski, Kirk Wilhelmsen, Rachelle Doody
Journal-article: Alzheimer's & Dementia, vol. 8, pp. P672, 2012
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Deepika Lal, Yanchun Li, Rachelle S. Doody, Kirk Wilhelmsen, Li Yan, Song Liu, Changxing Ma,
Journal-article: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, vol. 33, pp. 517-523, 2012
Authors: Y Li, C A Shaw, I Sheffer, N Sule, S Z Powell, B Dawson, S N Y Zaidi, K L Bucasas, J R Lupski, K C Wilhelmsen, R Doody, K Szigeti
Abstract: Genetic variation, both single-nucleotide variations and copy number variations (CNV), contribute to changes in gene expression. In some cases these variations are meaningfully correlated with disease states. We hypothesized that in a genetically heterogeneous disorder such as sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), utilizing gene expression as a quantitative trait and CNVs as a genetic marker map within the same individuals in the context of case-control status may increase the power to detect relevant loci. Using this approach an 8-kb deletion was identified that contains a PAX6-binding site on chr2q33.3 upstream of CREB1 encoding the cAMP responsive element-binding protein1 transcription factor. The association of the CNV to AD was confirmed by a case-control association study consisting of the Texas Alzheimer Research and Care Consortium and NIA-LOAD Family Study data sets.
PubMedId: 23168992
Journal-article: Translational psychiatry, vol. 2, 2012
Authors: C. A. C. Wijman, , S. M. Smirnakis, P. Vespa, K. Szigeti, W. C. Ziai, M. M. Ning, J. Rosand, D. F. Hanley, R. Geocadin, C. Hall, P. D. Le Roux, J. I. Suarez, O. O. Zaidat
Journal-article: Neurocritical Care, vol. 16, pp. 42-54, 2011
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Rachelle S Doody
PubMedId: 21631907
Journal-article: Alzheimer's research & therapy, vol. 3, 2011
Authors: C A Shaw, Y Li, J Wiszniewska, S Chasse, S N Y Zaidi, W Jin, B Dawson, K Wilhelmsen, J R Lupski, J W Belmont, R S Doody, K Szigeti
Abstract: Copy number variants (CNVs) have been recognized as a source of genetic variation that contributes to disease phenotypes. Alzheimer disease (AD) has high heritability for occurrence and age at onset (AAO). We performed a cases-only genome-wide CNV association study for age at onset of AD. The discovery case series (n = 40 subjects with AD) was evaluated using array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH). A replication case series (n = 507 subjects with AD) was evaluated using Affymetrix array (n = 243) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (n = 264). Hazard models related onset age to CNV. The discovery sample identified a chromosomal segment on 14q11.2 (19.3-19.5 Mb, NCBI build 36, UCSC hg18 March 2006) as a region of interest (genome-wide adjusted p = 0.032) for association with AAO of AD. This region encompasses a cluster of olfactory receptors. The replication sample confirmed the association (p = 0.035). The association was found for each APOE4 gene dosage (0, 1, and 2). High copy number in the olfactory receptor region on 14q11.2 is associated with younger age at onset of AD.
PubMedId: 21482944
Journal-article: Neurology, vol. 76, 2011
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Rachelle S Doody
Abstract: Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease affecting 1 in 68 in the population. An arbitrary cutoff 65 years as the age of onset to distinguish between early- and late-onset AD has been proposed and has been used in the literature for decades. As the majority of patients develop AD after 65 years of age, most clinical trials address this population. While the early-onset cases represent only 1% to 6% of AD cases, this population is the active working subset and thus contributes to a higher public health burden per individual, and early-onset cases are the most devastating at the level of the individual and their families. In this review, we compare and contrast the clinical, neuropsychological, imaging, genetic, biomarker, and pathological features of these two arbitrary groups. Finally, we discuss the ethical dilemma of non-abandonment and justice as it pertains to exclusion of the early-onset AD patients from clinical trials.
PubMedId: 21345175
Journal-article: Alzheimer's research & therapy, vol. 3, 2011
Authors: Anthony Antonellis, Megan Y. Dennis, Grzegorz Burzynski, Jimmy Huynh, Valerie Maduro, Chani J. Hodonsky, Mehrdad Khajavi, Kinga Szigeti, Sandeep Mukkamala, Seneca L. Bessling, William J. Pavan, Andrew S. McCallion, James R. Lupski, Eric D. Green,
Abstract: Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a critical structural component of myelin in the peripheral nervous system. The MPZ gene is regulated, in part, by the transcription factors SOX10 and EGR2. Mutations in MPZ, SOX10, and EGR2 have been implicated in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that components of this transcriptional network are candidates for harboring disease-causing mutations (or otherwise functional variants) that affect MPZ expression. We utilized a combination of multi-species sequence comparisons, transcription factor-binding site predictions, targeted human DNA re-sequencing, and in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays to study human non-coding MPZ variants. Our efforts revealed a variant within the first intron of MPZ that resides within a previously described SOX10 binding site is associated with decreased enhancer activity, and alters binding of nuclear proteins. Additionally, the genomic segment harboring this variant directs tissue-relevant reporter gene expression in zebrafish. This is the first reported MPZ variant within a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element. While we were unable to implicate this variant in disease onset, our data suggests that similar non-coding sequences should be screened for mutations in patients with neurological disease. Furthermore, our multi-faceted approach for examining the functional significance of non-coding variants can be readily generalized to study other loci important for myelin structure and function.
PubMedId: 21179557
Journal-article: PLoS ONE, vol. 5, pp. e14346, 2010
Authors: Heather M. McLaughlin, Reiko Sakaguchi, Cuiping Liu, Takao Igarashi, Davut Pehlivan, Kristine Chu, Ram Iyer, Pedro Cruz, Praveen F. Cherukuri, Nancy F. Hansen, James C. Mullikin, Leslie G. Biesecker, Thomas E. Wilson, Victor Ionasescu, Garth Nicholson, Charles Searby, Kevin Talbot, Jeffrey M. Vance, Stephan Z??chner, Kinga Szigeti, James R. Lupski, Ya-Ming Hou, Eric D. Green, Anthony Antonellis
Abstract: Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease comprises a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of peripheral nerve disorders characterized by impaired distal motor and sensory function. Mutations in three genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) have been implicated in CMT disease primarily associated with an axonal pathology. ARSs are ubiquitously expressed, essential enzymes responsible for charging tRNA molecules with their cognate amino acids. To further explore the role of ARSs in CMT disease, we performed a large-scale mutation screen of the 37 human ARS genes in a cohort of 355 patients with a phenotype consistent with CMT. Here we describe three variants (p.Leu133His, p.Tyr173SerfsX7, and p.Ile302Met) in the lysyl-tRNA synthetase (KARS) gene in two patients from this cohort. Functional analyses revealed that two of these mutations (p.Leu133His and p.Tyr173SerfsX7) severely affect enzyme activity. Interestingly, both functional variants were found in a single patient with CMT disease and additional neurological and non-neurological sequelae. Based on these data, KARS becomes the fourth ARS gene associated with CMT disease, indicating that this family of enzymes is specifically critical for axon function.
PubMedId: 20920668
Journal-article: The American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 87, pp. 560-566, 2010
Authors: Norbert Sule, Yanchun Li, Kinga Szigeti
Journal-article: Alzheimer's & Dementia, vol. 5, pp. P471, 2009
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, James R Lupski
Abstract: Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders presenting with the phenotype of a chronic progressive neuropathy affecting both the motor and sensory nerves. During the last decade over two dozen genes have been identified in which mutations cause CMT. The disease illustrates a multitude of genetic principles, including diverse mutational mechanisms from point mutations to copy number variation (CNV), allelic heterogeneity, age-dependent penetrance and variable expressivity. Population based studies have determined the contributions of the various genes to disease burden enabling evidence-based approaches to genetic testing.
PubMedId: 19277060
Journal-article: European journal of human genetics : EJHG, vol. 17, 2009
Authors: J.D. England, G.S. Gronseth, G. Franklin, G.T. Carter, L.J. Kinsella, J.A. Cohen, A.K. Asbury, K. Szigeti, J.R. Lupski, N. Latov, R.A. Lewis, P.A. Low, M.A. Fisher, D. Herrmann, J.F. Howard, G. Lauria, R.G. Miller, M. Polydefkis, A.J. Sumner
Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of autonomic testing, nerve biopsy and skin biopsy for the assessment of polyneuropathy. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based upon the level of evidence. 1. Autonomic testing may be considered in the evaluation of patients with polyneuropathy to document autonomic nervous system dysfunction (Level B). Such testing should be considered especially for the evaluation of suspected autonomic neuropathy (Level B) and distal small fiber sensory polyneuropathy (SFSN) (Level C). A battery of validated tests is recommended to achieve the highest diagnostic accuracy (Level B). 2. Nerve biopsy is generally accepted as useful in the evaluation of certain neuropathies as in patients with suspected amyloid neuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex due to vasculitis, or with atypical forms of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, the literature is insufficient to provide a recommendation regarding when a nerve biopsy may be useful in the evaluation of DSP (Level U). 3. Skin biopsy is a validated technique for determining intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density and may be considered for the diagnosis of DSP, particularly SFSN (Level C). There is a need for additional prospective studies to define more exact guidelines for the evaluation of polyneuropathy.
PubMedId: 19627868
Journal-article: PM&R, vol. 1, pp. 14-22, 2009
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Chad Shaw, Yanchun Li, James R. Lupski, John Belmont, Rachelle S. Doody
Journal-article: Alzheimer's & Dementia, vol. 5, pp. P469, 2009
Authors: J.D. England, G.S. Gronseth, G. Franklin, G.T. Carter, L.J. Kinsella, J.A. Cohen, A.K. Asbury, K. Szigeti, J.R. Lupski, N. Latov, R.A. Lewis, P.A. Low, M.A. Fisher, D. Herrmann, J.F. Howard, G. Lauria, R.G. Miller, M. Polydefkis, A.J. Sumner
Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of laboratory and genetic tests for the assessment of DSP. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based on the level of evidence. (1) Screening laboratory tests may be considered for all patients with polyneuropathy (Level C). Those tests that provide the highest yield of abnormality are blood glucose, serum B(12) with metabolites (methylmalonic acid with or without homocysteine), and serum protein immunofixation electrophoresis (Level C). If there is no definite evidence of diabetes mellitus by routine testing of blood glucose, testing for impaired glucose tolerance may be considered in distal symmetric sensory polyneuropathy (Level C). (2) Genetic testing is established as useful for the accurate diagnosis and classification of hereditary neuropathies (Level A). Genetic testing may be considered in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level C). Initial genetic testing should be guided by the clinical phenotype, inheritance pattern, and electrodiagnostic (EDX) features and should focus on the most common abnormalities, which are CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion, Cx32 (GJB1), and MFN2 mutation screening. There is insufficient evidence to determine the usefulness of routine genetic testing in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who do not exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level U).
PubMedId: 19086068
Journal-article: Muscle & Nerve, vol. 39, pp. 116-125, 2009
Authors: J.D. England, G.S. Gronseth, G. Franklin, G.T. Carter, L.J. Kinsella, J.A. Cohen, A.K. Asbury, K. Szigeti, J.R. Lupski, N. Latov, R.A. Lewis, P.A. Low, M.A. Fisher, D. Herrmann, J.F. Howard, G. Lauria, R.G. Miller, M. Polydefkis, A.J. Sumner
Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of autonomic testing, nerve biopsy, and skin biopsy for the assessment of polyneuropathy. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based on the level of evidence. (1) Autonomic testing may be considered in the evaluation of patients with polyneuropathy to document autonomic nervous system dysfunction (Level B). Such testing should be considered especially for the evaluation of suspected autonomic neuropathy (Level B) and distal small fiber sensory polyneuropathy (SFSN) (Level C). A battery of validated tests is recommended to achieve the highest diagnostic accuracy (Level B). (2) Nerve biopsy is generally accepted as useful in the evaluation of certain neuropathies as in patients with suspected amyloid neuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex due to vasculitis, or with atypical forms of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, the literature is insufficient to provide a recommendation regarding when a nerve biopsy may be useful in the evaluation of DSP (Level U). (3) Skin biopsy is a validated technique for determining intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density and may be considered for the diagnosis of DSP, particularly SFSN (Level C). There is a need for additional prospective studies to define more exact guidelines for the evaluation of polyneuropathy.
PubMedId: 19086069
Journal-article: Muscle & Nerve, vol. 39, pp. 106-115, 2009
Authors: J.D. England, G.S. Gronseth, G. Franklin, G.T. Carter, L.J. Kinsella, J.A. Cohen, A.K. Asbury, K. Szigeti, J.R. Lupski, N. Latov, R.A. Lewis, P.A. Low, M.A. Fisher, D.N. Herrmann, J.F. Howard, G. Lauria, R.G. Miller, M. Polydefkis, A.J. Sumner
Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of laboratory and genetic tests for the assessment of DSP. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based upon the level of evidence. 1. Screening laboratory tests may be considered for all patients with polyneuropathy (Level C). Those tests that provide the highest yield of abnormality are blood glucose, serum B12 with metabolites (methylmalonic acid with or without homocysteine) and serum protein immunofixation electrophoresis (Level C). If there is no definite evidence of diabetes mellitus by routine testing of blood glucose, testing for impaired glucose tolerance may be considered in distal symmetric sensory polyneuropathy (Level C). 2. Genetic testing is established as useful for the accurate diagnosis and classification of hereditary neuropathies (Level A). Genetic testing may be considered in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level C). Initial genetic testing should be guided by the clinical phenotype, inheritance pattern, and electrodiagnostic (EDX) features and should focus on the most common abnormalities which are CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion, Cx32 (GJB1), and MFN2 mutation screening. There is insufficient evidence to determine the usefulness of routine genetic testing in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who do not exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level U).
PubMedId: 19627867
Journal-article: PM&R, vol. 1, pp. 5-13, 2009
Authors: J. D. England, G. S. Gronseth, G. Franklin, G. T. Carter, L. J. Kinsella, J. A. Cohen, A. K. Asbury, K. Szigeti, J. R. Lupski, N. Latov, R. A. Lewis, P. A. Low, M. A. Fisher, D. N. Herrmann, J. F. Howard, G. Lauria, R. G. Miller, M. Polydefkis, A. J. Sumner
Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of laboratory and genetic tests for the assessment of DSP. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based upon the level of evidence. 1) Screening laboratory tests may be considered for all patients with polyneuropathy (Level C). Those tests that provide the highest yield of abnormality are blood glucose, serum B12 with metabolites (methylmalonic acid with or without homocysteine), and serum protein immunofixation electrophoresis (Level C). If there is no definite evidence of diabetes mellitus by routine testing of blood glucose, testing for impaired glucose tolerance may be considered in distal symmetric sensory polyneuropathy (Level C). 2) Genetic testing should be conducted for the accurate diagnosis and classification of hereditary neuropathies (Level A). Genetic testing may be considered in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level C). Initial genetic testing should be guided by the clinical phenotype, inheritance pattern, and electrodiagnostic features and should focus on the most common abnormalities which are CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion, Cx32 (GJB1), and MFN2 mutation screening. There is insufficient evidence to determine the usefulness of routine genetic testing in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy who do not exhibit a hereditary neuropathy phenotype (Level U).
PubMedId: 19056666
Journal-article: Neurology, vol. 72, pp. 185-192, 2008
Authors: J. D. England, G. S. Gronseth, G. Franklin, G. T. Carter, L. J. Kinsella, J. A. Cohen, A. K. Asbury, K. Szigeti, J. R. Lupski, N. Latov, R. A. Lewis, P. A. Low, M. A. Fisher, D. N. Herrmann, J. F. Howard, G. Lauria, R. G. Miller, M. Polydefkis, A. J. Sumner
Abstract: Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) is the most common variety of neuropathy. Since the evaluation of this disorder is not standardized, the available literature was reviewed to provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the role of autonomic testing, nerve biopsy, and skin biopsy for the assessment of polyneuropathy. A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Current Contents was performed to identify the best evidence regarding the evaluation of polyneuropathy published between 1980 and March 2007. Articles were classified according to a four-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based upon the level of evidence. 1) Autonomic testing should be considered in the evaluation of patients with polyneuropathy to document autonomic nervous system dysfunction (Level B). Such testing should be considered especially for the evaluation of suspected autonomic neuropathy (Level B) and distal small fiber sensory polyneuropathy (SFSN) (Level C). A battery of validated tests is recommended to achieve the highest diagnostic accuracy (Level B). 2) Nerve biopsy is generally accepted as useful in the evaluation of certain neuropathies as in patients with suspected amyloid neuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex due to vasculitis, or with atypical forms of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). However, the literature is insufficient to provide a recommendation regarding when a nerve biopsy may be useful in the evaluation of DSP (Level U). 3) Skin biopsy is a validated technique for determining intraepidermal nerve fiber density and may be considered for the diagnosis of DSP, particularly SFSN (Level C). There is a need for additional prospective studies to define more exact guidelines for the evaluation of polyneuropathy.
PubMedId: 19056667
Journal-article: Neurology, vol. 72, pp. 177-184, 2008
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Wojciech Wiszniewski, Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Diane L Sherman, Norbert Sule, Adekunle M Adesina, Pedro Mancias, Sozos Ch Papasozomenos, Geoffrey Miller, Laura Keppen, Donna Daentl, Peter J Brophy, James R Lupski
Abstract: Mutations in the EGR2 gene cause a spectrum of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and related inherited peripheral neuropathies. We ascertained ten consecutive patients with various EGR2 mutations, report a novel de novo mutation, and provide longitudinal clinical data to characterize the natural history of the peripheral neuropathy. We confirmed that respiratory compromise and cranial nerve dysfunction are commonly associated with EGR2 mutations and can be useful in guiding molecular diagnosis. We also contrast morphological studies in the context of the I268N homozygous recessive mutation affecting the NAB repressor binding site and the R359W dominant-negative mutation in the zinc-finger domain.
PubMedId: 17717711
Journal-article: Neurogenetics, vol. 8, 2007
Authors: Clement Y Chow, Yanling Zhang, James J Dowling, Natsuko Jin, Maja Adamska, Kensuke Shiga, Kinga Szigeti, Michael E Shy, Jun Li, Xuebao Zhang, James R Lupski, Lois S Weisman, Miriam H Meisler
Abstract: Membrane-bound phosphoinositides are signalling molecules that have a key role in vesicle trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Proteins that bind specific phosphoinositides mediate interactions between membrane-bounded compartments whose identity is partially encoded by cytoplasmic phospholipid tags. Little is known about the localization and regulation of mammalian phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2), a phospholipid present in small quantities that regulates membrane trafficking in the endosome-lysosome axis in yeast. Here we describe a multi-organ disorder with neuronal degeneration in the central nervous system, peripheral neuronopathy and diluted pigmentation in the 'pale tremor' mouse. Positional cloning identified insertion of ETn2beta (early transposon 2beta) into intron 18 of Fig4 (A530089I17Rik), the homologue of a yeast SAC (suppressor of actin) domain PtdIns(3,5)P2 5-phosphatase located in the vacuolar membrane. The abnormal concentration of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in cultured fibroblasts from pale tremor mice demonstrates the conserved biochemical function of mammalian Fig4. The cytoplasm of fibroblasts from pale tremor mice is filled with large vacuoles that are immunoreactive for LAMP-2 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2), consistent with dysfunction of the late endosome-lysosome axis. Neonatal neurodegeneration in sensory and autonomic ganglia is followed by loss of neurons from layers four and five of the cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and other localized brain regions. The sciatic nerve exhibits reduced numbers of large-diameter myelinated axons, slowed nerve conduction velocity and reduced amplitude of compound muscle action potentials. We identified pathogenic mutations of human FIG4 (KIAA0274) on chromosome 6q21 in four unrelated patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. This novel form of autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorder is designated CMT4J.
PubMedId: 17572665
Journal-article: Nature, vol. 448, 2007
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, James R. Lupski
Book-chapter: Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience, pp. 1099-1112, 2007
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Eva Nelis, James R. Lupski
Journal-article: NeuroMolecular Medicine, vol. 8, pp. 243-253, 2006
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Carlos A Garcia, James R Lupski
Abstract: An evidence-based approach was used to determine the frequency distribution of genes contributing to the Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease phenotype. We performed a combined analysis of 11 population-based studies from various ethnic backgrounds to generate an evidence-based testing scheme. To estimate the relative frequencies of the responsible genes for which population-based studies are not available, we used our cohort of clinically classified patients with CMT and related neuropathies collected before the availability of genetic testing. Similar mutation frequencies were detected in the various studies, revealing a uniform distribution of pathogenic mutations. In CMT1 70% of patients harbor the CMT1A duplication, followed by GJB1 mutations at 8.8%. MPZ and PMP22 mutations are less common, identified on average in 2.9% and 1.5% of patients, respectively. Other genes not tested in population-based studies contribute to less than 1% of disease individually. In CMT2 MFN2 mutations are the most common, although population-based studies are not yet available. CMT represents a heterogeneous group of disorders at the molecular level. Nevertheless, testing for the CMT1A duplication (i.e., duplication of PMP22) alone yields an accurate molecular diagnosis in approximately half of all patients. If one further specifies the clinical type (demyelinating vs. axonal), the yield of detecting a molecular defect increases to 75% to 80% in the demyelinating or CMT1 group with a screening test that evaluates for CMT1A duplication/hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies deletion and GJB1 point mutations.
PubMedId: 16481890
Journal-article: Genetics in medicine : official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics, vol. 8, 2006
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Eva Nelis, James R Lupski
Abstract: DNA diagnostics plays an important role in the characterization and management of patients manifesting inherited peripheral neuropathies. We describe the clinical integration of molecular diagnostics with medical history, physical examination, and electrophysiological studies. Molecular testing can help establish a secure diagnosis, enable genetic counseling regarding recurrence risk, potentially provide prognostic information, and in the near future may be important for the choice of therapies.
PubMedId: 16775379
Journal-article: Neuromolecular medicine, vol. 8, 2006
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Eva Nelis, James R. Lupski
Journal-article: NeuroMolecular Medicine, vol. 8, pp. 243-253, 2006
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Carlos A Garcia, James R Lupski
Journal-article: Genetics in Medicine, vol. 8, pp. 86-92, 2006
Authors: Kristien Verhoeven, Kristl G Claeys, Stephan Z?chner, J Michael Schr?der, Joachim Weis, Chantal Ceuterick, Albena Jordanova, Eva Nelis, Els De Vriendt, Matthias Van Hul, Pavel Seeman, Radim Mazanec, Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Kinga Szigeti, Pedro Mancias, Ian J Butler, Andrzej Kochanski, Barbara Ryniewicz, Jan De Bleecker, Peter Van den Bergh, Christine Verellen, Rudy Van Coster, Nathalie Goemans, Michaela Auer-Grumbach, Wim Robberecht, Vedrana Milic Rasic, Yoram Nevo, Ivajlo Tournev, Velina Guergueltcheva, Filip Roelens, Peter Vieregge, Paolo Vinci, Maria Teresa Moreno, H-J Christen, Michael E Shy, James R Lupski, Jeffery M Vance, Peter De Jonghe, Vincent Timmerman
PubMedId: 16714318
Journal Article: Brain : a journal of neurology, vol. 129, 2006
Authors: Michael E. Shy, Mena T. Scavina, Alisa Clark, Karen M. Krajewski, Jun Li, John Kamholz, Edwin Kolodny, Kinga Szigeti, Richard A. Fischer, Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Steven S. Scherer, James R. Lupski
Abstract: To determine the clinical consequences of the PMP22 point mutation, T118M, which has been previously considered to either cause an autosomal recessive form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease or be a benign polymorphism. We analyzed patients from five separate kindreds and characterized their peripheral nerve function by clinical and electrophysiological methods. All heterozygous patients had clinical and/or electrophysiological features of a neuropathy similar to hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPPs). The homozygous patient had a severe axonal neuropathy without features of demyelination. These findings suggest that T118M PMP22 retains some normal PMP22 activity, allowing the formation of compact myelin and normal nerve conduction velocities in the homozygous state. Taken together, these findings suggest that T118M is a pathogenic mutation causing a dominantly inherited form of CMT by a partial loss of PMP22 function.
PubMedId: 16437560
Journal-article: Annals of Neurology, vol. 59, pp. 358-364, 2006
Authors: Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Kinga Szigeti, Wojciech Wiszniewski, Michael E Shy, Karen Krajewski, Irena Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Andrzej Kochanski, Suzanne Reeser, Pedro Mancias, Ian Butler, James R Lupski
Abstract: Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of distal limb muscles. Recently, SIMPLE/LITAF was shown to be responsible for an autosomal dominant demyelinating form of CMT linked to 16p (CMT1C). Although two transcripts encoding different proteins (SIMPLE and LITAF) have been reported from the same gene, we could not confirm the existence of LITAF. Here we show that the LITAF transcript appears to result from a DNA sequencing error. We screened the SIMPLE gene for mutations in a cohort of 192 patients with CMT or related neuropathies, each of whom tested negative for other known genetic causes of CMT. In 16 unrelated CMT families we identified nine different nucleotide variations in SIMPLE that were not detected in control chromosomes. SIMPLE mutations can occur de novo, associated with sporadic CMT1 and may convey both demyelinating and axonal forms. Bioinformatics analyses and other observations of SIMPLE suggest that 1) it could be a member of the RING finger motif-containing subfamily of E3 ubiquitin ligases that are associated with the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome processing pathway, 2) it could interact through its PPXY motifs with a WW domain containing protein, for instance with NEDD4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, and 3) it could interact through the PSAP motif with TSG10, a protein associated with endosomal multivesicular protein sorting. Since both SIMPLE and Hrs are endosomal proteins and have both PPXY and P(S/T)AP motifs, we hypothesize that SIMPLE, like Hrs, is potentially a clathrin adaptor aiding in the retention of ubiquitinated proteins on to the endosomes. Thus the potential E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of SIMPLE, alteration in its interactions with NEDD4 or TSG101, or changes in its properties as a clathrin coat adaptor may underlie the pathogenesis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.
PubMedId: 15776429
Journal-article: Human mutation, vol. 25, 2005
Authors: K. Szigeti, N. Sule, A. M. Adesina, D. L. Armstrong, G. M. Saifi, E. Bonilla, M. Hirano, J. R. Lupski
Abstract: Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy is an autosomal recessive multisystemic disorder caused by thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. Whereas the pathomechanism of the secondary mitochondrial dysfunction has been extensively studied, that of the leukoencephalopathy has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that the white matter hyperintensities on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images reflect disturbance of blood-brain barrier function. Albumin immunohistochemistry disclosed quantitative (p < 0.01) and qualitative differences between the mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy and control brains, indicating that loss of thymidine phosphorylase function impairs the integrity of the blood-brain barrier.
PubMedId: 15562405
Journal-article: Annals of Neurology, vol. 56, pp. 881-886, 2004
Authors: K Szigeti, L-J C Wong, C-L Perng, G M Saifi, K Eldin, A M Adesina, D L Cass, M Hirano, J R Lupski, F Scaglia
PubMedId: 14757860
Case Reports: Journal of medical genetics, vol. 41, 2004
Authors: K Szigeti
Journal-article: Journal of Medical Genetics, vol. 41, pp. 125-129, 2004
Authors: S A Yatsenko, A N Yatsenko, K Szigeti, W J Craigen, P Stankiewicz, S W Cheung, J R Lupski
Abstract: We present molecular genetic investigations of a 4-year-old boy with craniofacial dysmorphism and developmental delay. Trivial mitral and tricuspid regurgitation without gross structural abnormality was diagnosed by echocardiography. High-resolution chromosome analysis revealed an interstitial deletion, del(10)(p12.1p12.32). To characterize the deletion size and breakpoints, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using 27 BAC clones. Our data demonstrate an approximately 5.5 Mb deletion del(10)(p12.1p12.31). Surprisingly, the BAC clone RP11-56H7 that contains NEBL, an apparent downstream gene of the cardiogenic transcription factor HAND2 previously shown to be deleted in the patients with DiGeorge 2 syndrome and 10p13 deletion, was deleted in our patient with 10p12.1-p12.31 deletion. In addition, we provide clinical data and results of molecular analysis for a patient with multiple congenital anomalies including Ebstein's anomaly, kidney malformations, and 10p13-p14 deletion. We also reviewed 19 patients with congenital heart defects and deletions involving 10p and propose that atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common cardiac anomaly associated with DiGeorge 2 syndrome. Based on genotype-phenotype analysis of published patients and those reported herein, we propose an approximately 1.0 Mb critical region between loci D10S547 and D10S2176 in 10p14 to be associated with ASD. Considering that septal defects are the most frequent congenital heart anomaly, we suggest that further investigations in the 10p critical region are important to identify gene(s) responsible for this common birth defect.
PubMedId: 15253763
Journal-article: Clinical genetics, vol. 66, 2004
Authors: Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Kinga Szigeti, G. Jackson Snipes, Carlos A. Garcia, James R. Lupski
Journal-article: Journal Of Investigative Medicine, vol. 51, pp. 261, 2003
Authors: Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Kinga Szigeti, G Jackson Snipes, Carlos A Garcia, James R Lupski
Abstract: During the last decade, 18 genes and 11 additional loci harboring candidate genes have been associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related peripheral neuropathies. Ten of these 18 genes have been identified in the last 2 years. This phenomenal pace of CMT gene discovery has fomented an unprecedented explosion of information regarding peripheral nerve biology and its pathologic manifestations in CMT. This review integrates molecular genetics with the clinical phenotypes and provides a flowchart for molecular-based diagnostics. In addition, we discuss rational approaches to molecular therapeutics, including novel biologic molecules (eg, small interfering ribonucleic acid [siRNA], antisense RNA, and ribozymes) that potentially could be used as drugs in the future. These may be applicable in attempts to normalize gene expression in cases of CMT type 1A, wherein a 1.5 Mb genomic duplication causes an increase in gene dosage that is associated with the majority of CMT cases. Aggresome formation by the PMP22 gene product, the disease-associated gene in the duplication cases, could thus be avoided. We also discuss alternative therapeutics, in light of other neurodegenerative disorders, to disrupt such aggresomes. Finally, we review rational therapeutic approaches, including the use of antioxidants such as vitamin E, coenzyme Q10, or lipoic acid to relax potential oxidative stress in peripheral nerves, for CMT management.
PubMedId: 14577517
Journal-article: Journal of investigative medicine : the official publication of the American Federation for Clinical Research, vol. 51, 2003
Authors: Kinga Szigeti, Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Dawna Armstrong, John W Belmont, Geoffrey Miller, James R Lupski
Abstract: We report a case of congenital hypomyelination associated with cranial nerve dysfunction, respiratory failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy confounding the clinical picture. Molecular genetic testing showed a complex de novo myelin protein zero (MPZ) mutation consisting of a 3bp deletion of CTA from nucleotide 550 to 552 and insertion of G at nucleotide 550 that by conceptual translation results in a frameshift mutation. Muscle biopsy findings are presented that allude to the effect of abnormal innervation on early postnatal muscle differentiation.
PubMedId: 12953275
Journal-article: Annals of neurology, vol. 54, 2003
Authors: P Stankiewicz, S W Cheung, C J Shaw, R Saleki, K Szigeti, J R Lupski
Abstract: Jumping translocations (JTs) are very rare chromosome aberrations, usually identified in tumors. We report a constitutional JT between donor chromosome 21q21.3-->qter and recipients 13qter and 18qter, resulting in an approximately 15.5-Mb proximal deletion 21q in a girl with mild developmental delay and minor dysmorphic features. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies, we identified an approximately 550-kb complex inter- and intra-chromosomal low-copy repeat (LCR) adjacent to the 21q21.3 translocation breakpoint. On the recipient chromosomes 13qter and 18qter, the telomeric sequences TTAGGG were retained. Genotyping revealed that the deletion was of maternal origin. We propose that genome architecture involving LCRs may be a major mechanism responsible for the origin of jumping translocations.
PubMedId: 14610351
Journal-article: Cytogenetic and genome research, vol. 101, 2003
Authors: Gulam Mustafa Saifi, Kinga Szigeti, Jackson G. Snipes, Carlos A. Garcia, James R. Lupski
Journal-article: Journal of Investigative Medicine, vol. 51, pp. 261-283, 2003
Authors: R E Reiter, Z Gu, T Watabe, G Thomas, K Szigeti, E Davis, M Wahl, S Nisitani, J Yamashiro, M M Le Beau, M Loda, O N Witte
PubMedId: 9465086
Journal Article: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 95, 1998
Authors: R. E. Reiter, Z. Gu, T. Watabe, G. Thomas, K. Szigeti, E. Davis, M. Wahl, S. Nisitani, J. Yamashiro, M. M. Le Beau, M. Loda, O. N. Witte
Journal-article: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 95, pp. 1735-1740, 1998
Presented by CUBS © 2022