UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Rina Das Eiden UB Profile
Psychology
Senior Research Scientist
1021 Main Street
Buffalo NY 14203
716-887-3350
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Danielle S. Molnar, Douglas A. Granger, Shannon Shisler, Rina D. Eiden
Journal-article: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 67, pp. 31-36, 2018
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Junru Zhao, Meghan Casey, Shannon Shisler, Pamela Schuetze, Craig R. Colder
Journal-article: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 185, pp. 82-92, 2018
Authors: Xiaozhong Wen, Rina D Eiden, Faye E Justicia-Linde, Youfa Wang, Stephen T Higgins, Nicolas Thor, Arsalan Haghdel, Ariel R Peters, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 29648615
Journal-article: Translational Behavioral Medicine, 2018
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Pamela Schuetze, Shannon Shisler, Marilyn A. Huestis
Journal-article: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 68, pp. 47-56, 2018
Authors: Jennifer A. Livingston, Rina D. Eiden, Jared Lessard, Meghan Casey, James Henrie, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 47, pp. 515-533, 2017
Authors: Shannon Shisler, Rina D. Eiden, Danielle S. Molnar, Pamela Schuetze, Marilyn Huestis, Gregory Homish
PubMedId: 28403474
Journal-article: Nicotine & Tobacco Research, vol. 19, pp. 525-531, 2017
Authors: Pamela Schuetze, Rina D. Eiden, Craig R. Colder, Marilyn A. Huestis, Kenneth E. Leonard
PubMedId: 28383108
Journal-article: Child Development, vol. 89, pp. e123-e137, 2017
Authors: Danielle S. Molnar, Diana Rancourt, Robert Schlauch, Xiaozhong Wen, Marilyn A. Huestis, Rina D. Eiden
PubMedId: 28169405
Journal-article: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, vol. 42, pp. 679-688, 2017
Authors: Xiuhong Li, Rina D Eiden, Leonard H Epstein, Edmond D Shenassa, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen
Abstract: It remains unclear why substantial variations in neurodevelopmental outcomes exist within small-for-gestational-age (SGA) children. We prospectively compared 5-y neurodevelopmental outcomes across SGA etiological subgroups. Children born SGA (N = 1050) from U.S. Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (2001-2007) was divided into etiological subgroups by each of 7 well-established prenatal risk factors. We fit linear regression models to compare 5-y reading, math, gross motor and fine motor scores across SGA subgroups, adjusting for socio-demographic confounders. Compared to singleton SGA subgroup, multiple-birth SGA subgroup had lower mean reading (adjusted mean difference, -4.08 [95% confidence interval, -6.10, -2.06]) and math (-2.22 [-3.61, -0.84]) scores. These disadvantages in reading and math existed only among multiple-birth SGA subgroup without ovulation stimulation (reading, -4.50 [-6.64, -2.36]; math, -2.91 [-4.37, -1.44]), but not among those with ovulation stimulation (reading, -2.33 [-6.24, 1.57]; math 0.63 [-1.86, 3.12]). Compared to singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain, singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) had lower mean reading (-4.81 [-8.50, -1.12]) and math (-2.95 [-5.51, -0.38]) scores. These differences were not mediated by Apgar score. Multiple-birth SGA subgroups (vs. singleton SGA) or singleton SGA subgroup with co-occurrence of smoking and inadequate GWG (vs. singleton SGA subgroup without maternal smoking and inadequate gestational weight gain) have poorer cognitive development up to 5 y.
PubMedId: 27501456
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 11, 2016
Authors: Shannon Shisler, Rina D. Eiden, Danielle S. Molnar, Pamela Schuetze, Claire D. Coles, Marilyn Huestis, Craig R. Colder
Journal-article: Infant Behavior and Development, vol. 45, pp. 1-10, 2016
Authors: Stephanie A. Godleski, Rina D. Eiden, Pamela Schuetze, Craig R. Colder, Marilyn A. Huestis
Journal-article: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 57, pp. 87-94, 2016
Authors: Xiuhong Li, Rina D Eiden, Leonard H Epstein, Edmond D Shenassa, Chuanbo Xie, Xiaozhong Wen
Keywords: Small-for-gestational-age appropriate-for-gestational-age children cognition parenting psychomotor
Abstract: To examine whether different dimensions of parenting at different ages help small-for-gestational-age (SGA) children 'catch-up' the normal children in cognition and psychomotor. We analyzed data of 800 children born SGA and 3,000 children born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth cohort. The Two Bag Task was used to measure 2-year or 4-year parenting dimensions. Children's reading, math, gross motor, and fine motor scores were assessed at 5years. Multivariable linear regression models were fitted to test the interactions between SGA and 2-year or 4-year parenting dimensions on 5-year cognitive and psychomotor outcomes (dependent variables). There were significant interactions between SGA and early parenting on 5-year reading, math, and fine motor scores. The gap between SGA and AGA children in 5-year fine motor score was attenuated to null [-0.25 (95% confidence interval, -0.41, -0.09) vs. 0.03 (-0.13, 0.20)] when 2-year parental sensitivity score increased from 1 standard deviation (SD) below mean (Mean-SD) to 1 SD above mean (Mean+SD). The gap between SGA and AGA children in 5-year fine motor [-0.28 (-0.44, -0.13) vs. 0.06 (-0.09, 0.22)] and math [-1.32 (-2.27, -0.37) vs. 0.20 (-0.77, 1.17)] scores was also attenuated to null when 4-year parental emotional support score increased from Mean-SD to Mean+SD. In contrast, the gap between SGA and AGA children in 5-year reading score increased from 0.49 (-0.90, 1.88) to -1.31 (-2.55, -0.07) when 4-year parental intrusiveness score increased from Mean-SD to Mean+SD. Similarly, the gap between SGA and AGA children in fine motor score increased with 4-year parental negative regard from 0.02 (-0.14, 0.18) to -0.23 (-0.38, -0.08). Early high-quality parenting may buffer some adversity in long-termreading, math, and fine motor skills related to SGA birth, whereas low-quality parenting can amplify the adversity.
PubMedId: 27678110
Journal-article: Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines, vol. 58, 2016
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Jared Lessard, Craig R Colder, Jennifer Livingston, Meghan Casey, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: A developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use beginning in infancy was examined in a sample of children with alcoholic and nonalcoholic parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression and antisocial behavior in a cascading process of risk via 3 major hypothesized pathways: first, via parental warmth/sensitivity from toddler to kindergarten age predicting higher parental monitoring in middle childhood through early adolescence, serving as a protective pathway for adolescent substance use; second, via child low self-regulation in the preschool years to a continuing externalizing behavior problem pathway leading to underage drinking and higher engagement with substance using peers; and third, via higher social competence from kindergarten age through middle childhood being protective against engagement with delinquent and substance using peers, and leading to lower adolescent substance use. The sample consisted of 227 intact families recruited from the community at 12 months of child age. Results were supportive for the first 2 pathways to substance use in late adolescence. Among proximal, early adolescent risks, engagement with delinquent peers and parent's acceptance of underage drinking were significant predictors of late adolescent alcohol and marijuana use. The results highlight the important protective roles of maternal warmth/sensitivity in early childhood to kindergarten age, parental monitoring in middle childhood, and of child self-regulation in the preschool period as reducing risk for externalizing behavior problems, underage drinking, and engagement with delinquent peers in early adolescence. Specific implications for the creation of developmentally fine-tuned preventive intervention are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMedId: 27584669
Journal-article: Developmental psychology, vol. 52, 2016
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Stephanie Godleski, Pamela Schuetze, Craig R. Colder
Journal-article: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 137, pp. 12-29, 2015
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Danielle S. Molnar, Douglas A. Granger, Craig R. Colder, Pamela Schuetze, Marilyn A. Huestis
Journal-article: Developmental Psychobiology, vol. 57, pp. 212-225, 2015
Authors: Kai Ling Kong, Rina D Eiden, Denise M Feda, Corrin L Stier, Kelly D Fletcher, Elizabeth M Woodworth, Rocco A Paluch, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: The reinforcing value of food may be established early in life. Research shows that infant weight status is related to the relative reinforcing value of food versus non-food alternatives (food reinforcing ratio, FRR). The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the effects of a 6-week music enhancement program (Music Together, n=14) versus an active play date control group (n=13) on the FRR in 9- to 16-month-old infants who were high in relative food reinforcement. Participating parents and infants attended six weekly 45-min group classes. Parents in the music group and the play date group were encouraged to listen to the Music Together program CD or play with the play date group's toy with their infants at home, respectively. Intent-to-treat analysis showed a decrease in FRR for infants in the music group (meanSD: -0.130.13) in comparison to a slight increase in the control group (0.040.11) (F[1, 24] =11.86, P=0.002). These findings provide evidence that relative reinforcing value of food can be reduced by promoting alternative reinforcers at an early age.
PubMedId: 27028283
Journal-article: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 24, 2015
Authors: Kai Ling Kong, Denise M Feda, Rina D Eiden, Leonard H Epstein
Keywords: enriched environment food reinforcement infancy non-food reinforce obesity
Abstract: Rapid weight gain in infancy is associated with a higher risk of obesity in children and adults. A high relative reinforcing value of food is cross-sectionally related to obesity; lean children find nonfood alternatives more reinforcing than do overweight/obese children. However, to our knowledge, there is no research on how and when food reinforcement develops. This study was designed to assess whether the reinforcing value of food and nonfood alternatives could be tested in 9- to 18-mo-old infants and whether the reinforcing value of food and nonfood alternatives is differentially related to infant weight status. Reinforcing values were assessed by using absolute progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, with presentation of food and nonfood alternatives counterbalanced in 2 separate studies. Two nonfood reinforcers [Baby Einstein-Baby MacDonald shows (study 1, n = 27) or bubbles (study 2, n = 30)] were tested against the baby's favorite food. Food reinforcing ratio (FRR) was quantified by measuring the reinforcing value of food (Food Pmax) in proportion to the total reinforcing value of food and a nonfood alternative (DVD Pmax or BUB Pmax). Greater weight-for-length z score was associated with a greater FRR of a favorite food in study 1 (FRR-DVD) (r = 0.60, P < 0.001) and FRR of a favorite food in study 2 (FRR-BUB) (r = 0.49, P = 0.006), primarily because of the strong association between greater weight-for-length z score and lower DVD Pmax (r = -0.71, P < 0.0001) and BUB Pmax (r = -0.53, P = 0.003). Infant monthly weight gain was positively associated with FRR-DVD (r = 0.57, P = 0.009) and FRR-BUB (r = 0.37, P = 0.047). Our newly developed paradigm, which tested 2 different nonfood alternatives, demonstrated that lean infants find nonfood alternatives more reinforcing than do overweight/obese infants. This observation suggests that strengthening the alternative reinforcers may have a protective effect against childhood obesity.
PubMedId: 25733636
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 101, 2015
Authors: Shannon Shisler, Gregory G. Homish, Danielle S. Molnar, Pamela Schuetze, Craig R. Colder, Rina D. Eiden
Journal-article: Nicotine & Tobacco Research, pp. ntv057, 2015
Authors: Brent Finger, Pamela Schuetze, Rina Eiden
Journal-article: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 146, pp. e278, 2015
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Claire D. Coles, Pamela Schuetze, Craig R. Colder
Journal-article: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, pp. 139-153, 2014
Authors: Pamela Schuetze, Rina D. Eiden, Danielle S. Molnar, Craig D. Colder
Journal-article: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 42, pp. 1-8, 2014
Authors: Yvette Veira, Brent Finger, Pamela Schuetze, Craig R. Colder, Stephanie Godleski, Rina D. Eiden
Journal-article: Psychology of Violence, vol. 4, pp. 266-280, 2014
Authors: Jared Lessard, James Henrie, Jennifer A Livingston, Kenneth E Leonard, Craig R Colder, Rina D Eiden
Abstract: Few studies have examined predictors of ever having used electronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes) among older adolescents. This study examined correlates of ever having used e-cigarettes among adolescent children of alcoholic fathers. Participants were 136 adolescents (50.7% male, 89.4% European American) from an ongoing longitudinal case-control study of children of alcoholic fathers. Adolescents reported on their mother's and father's parenting during middle adolescence (MA; M age = 13.8) and completed measures of their own, as well as their peers', substance use during late adolescence (LA; M age = 17.0). Parents completed measures of their own substance use at the MA assessment. More than one third (36.9%) of the participants reported ever using e-cigarettes. Parental monitoring during MA (odds ratio [OR] = 0.85, p < .05), lifetime use of cigarettes (OR = 3.88, p < .01), alcohol use (OR = 7.72, p < .05), marijuana use (OR = 4.07, p < .01), and peer substance use (OR = 1.34, p < .05) during LA were each uniquely associated with ever having used e-cigarettes. Ever having used e-cigarettes also was associated with more frequent current cigarette use ( = .38, p < .05), alcohol use ( = .30, p < .01), and marijuana use ( = .31, p < .05). Results suggest that ever having used e-cigarettes in LA is a risk marker for substance use. Interventions to promote parental monitoring may be effective in curbing use of e-cigarettes and other substances in LA.
PubMedId: 25173773
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 16, 2014
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Stephanie Godleski, Craig R. Colder, Pamela Schuetze
Journal-article: Neurotoxicology and Teratology, vol. 44, pp. 1-10, 2014
Authors: Sarah E. Adkison, Kerry Grohman, Craig R. Colder, Kenneth Leonard, Toni Orrange-Torchia, Ellen Peterson, Rina D. Eiden
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 74, pp. 674-683, 2013
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Gregory G. Homish, Craig R. Colder, Pamela Schuetze, Teresa R. Gray, Marilyn A. Huestis
Journal-article: Substance Use & Misuse, vol. 48, pp. 513-522, 2013
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Kenneth E. Leonard, Craig R. Colder, Gregory G. Homish, Pamela Schuetze, Teresa R. Gray, Marilyn A. Huestis
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 72, pp. 926-932, 2011
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Yvette Veira, Douglas A. Granger
Journal-article: Child Development, vol. 80, pp. 528-543, 2009
Presented by CUBS © 2022