UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Pinaki Sarder UB Profile
Pathology and Anatomical Sciences Biomedical Engineering
Assistant Professor
207 Farber Hall
Buffalo NY 14214
716-829-2265
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Lu??s Rodrigues, , Pinaki Sarder, Kuang-Yu Jen, Brandon Ginley, Jorge Pratas, Vitor Sousa, Arnaldo Figueiredo, Rui Alves, , , , , , , , , , ,
Journal-article: Portuguese Journal of Nephrology & Hypertension, vol. 34, 2021
Authors: Kuang-Yu Jen, Leema Krishna Murali, Brendon Lutnick, Brandon Ginley, Darshana Govind, Hidetoshi Mori, Guofeng Gao, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2021: Digital Pathology, 2021
Authors: Darshana Govind, Briana A. Santo, Brandon Ginley, Rabi Yacoub, Avi Z. Rosenberg, Kuang-Yu Jen, Vighnesh Walavalkar, Gregory E. Wilding, Amber M. Worral, Imtiaz Mohammad, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2021: Digital Pathology, 2021
Authors: Avinash Kammardi Shashiprakash, Brendon Lutnick, Brandon Ginley, Darshana Govind, Nicholas Lucarelli, Kuang-Yu Jen, Avi Z. Rosenberg, Anatoly Urisman, Vighnesh Walavalkar, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Marco Delsante, Mei Lin Z. Bissonnette, John E. Tomaszewski, David Manthey, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2021: Digital Pathology, 2021
Authors: Brandon Ginley, Kuang-Yu Jen, Seung Seok Han, Lu?s Rodrigues, Sanjay Jain, Agnes B Fogo, Jonathan Zuckerman, Vighnesh Walavalkar, Jeffrey C Miecznikowski, Yumeng Wen, Felicia Yen, Donghwan Yun, Kyung Chul Moon, Avi Rosenberg, Chirag Parikh, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 33622976
1: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, 2020
Authors: Briana A Santo, Avi Z Rosenberg, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 32205581
1: Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension, vol. 29, 2020
Authors: Darshana Govind, Kuang-Yu Jen, Karen Matsukuma, Guofeng Gao, Kristin A Olson, Dorina Gui, Gregory E Wilding, Samuel P Border, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 32632119
1: Scientific reports, vol. 10, 2020
Authors: Samuel Border, Kuang-Yu Jen, Washington Lc Dos-Santos, John Tomaszewski, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 32382209
1: Proceedings of SPIE--the International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 11320, 2020
Authors: Briana A Santo, Brahm H Segal, John E Tomaszewski, Imtiaz Mohammad, Amber M Worral, Sanjay Jain, Michelle B Visser, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 32377029
1: Proceedings of SPIE--the International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 11320, 2020
Authors: Brendon Lutnick, Brandon Ginley, Kuang-Yu Jen, Wen Dong, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 32362708
1: Proceedings of SPIE--the International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 11320, 2020
Authors: Leema Krishna Murali, Brendon Lutnick, Brandon Ginley, John E Tomaszewski, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 32362707
1: Proceedings of SPIE--the International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 11320, 2020
Authors: Brendon Lutnick, Brandon Ginley, Kuang-Yu Jen, Wen Dong, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2020: Digital Pathology, 2020
Authors: Brandon Ginley, Kuang-Yu Jen, Avi Rosenberg, Giovanni Maria Rossi, Sanjay Jain, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2020: Digital Pathology, 2020
Authors: Darshana Govind, Kuang-Yu Jen, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2020: Digital Pathology, 2020
Authors: Kathryn E Maraszek, Briana A Santo, Rabi Yacoub, John E Tomaszewski, Imtiaz Mohammad, Amber M Worral, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 32362706
1: Proceedings of SPIE--the International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 11320, 2020
Authors: Brendon Lutnick, Brandon Ginley, Darshana Govind, Sean D. McGarry, Peter S. LaViolette, Rabi Yacoub, Sanjay Jain, John E. Tomaszewski, Kuang-Yu Jen, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 31187088
Journal-article: Nature Machine Intelligence, vol. 1, pp. 112-119, 2019
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Aurijoy Majumdar, Kuang-Yu Jen, Sanjay Jain, John E. Tomaszewski
PubMedId: 31186597
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2019: Digital Pathology, 2019
Authors: Siddhartha Dhiman, Itender Singh, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2019: Digital Pathology, 2019
Authors: Dolonchampa Maji, Jin Lu, Pinaki Sarder, Anne H Schmieder, Grace Cui, Xiaoxia Yang, Dipanjan Pan, Matthew D Lew, Samuel Achilefu, Gregory M Lanza
PubMedId: 31249994
1: Precision nanomedicine, vol. 1, 2019
Authors: Brandon Ginley, Brendon Lutnick, John E. Tomaszewski, Pinaki Sarder, Darshana Govind
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2018: Digital Pathology, 2018
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Brendon Lutnick, Rabi Yacoub, Kuang-Yu Jen, John E. Tomaszewski, Sanjay Jain
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2018: Digital Pathology, 2018
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Brandon G. Ginley, John E. Tomaszewski, Kuang-Yu Jen, Agnes Fogo, Sanjay Jain
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2018: Digital Pathology, 2018
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Olivier Simon, Rabi Yacoub, Sanjay Jain, John E. Tomaszewski
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2018: Digital Pathology, 2018
Authors: Darshana Govind, Brendon Lutnick, John E. Tomaszewski, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 29721517
Journal-article: Journal of Medical Imaging, vol. 5, pp. 1, 2018
Authors: Sridhar T. Narla, Brandon Decker, Pinaki Sarder, Ewa K. Stachowiak, Michal K. Stachowiak
PubMedId: 30209658
Book-chapter: Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation, pp. 137-162, 2018
Authors: Brandon Ginley, Brendon Lutnick, Kuang-Yu Jen, Agnes B Fogo, Sanjay Jain, Avi Rosenberg, Vighnesh Walavalkar, Gregory Wilding, John E Tomaszewski, Rabi Yacoub, Giovanni Maria Rossi, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 31488606
1: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN, vol. 30, 2018
Authors: E. K. Stachowiak, C. A. Benson, S. T. Narla, A. Dimitri, L. E. Bayona Chuye, S. Dhiman, K. Harikrishnan, S. Elahi, D. Freedman, K. J. Brennand, P. Sarder, M. K. Stachowiak
Journal-article: Translational Psychiatry, vol. 7, 2017
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Rabi Yacoub, John E. Tomaszewski
Journal-article: Journal of Clinical and Translational Science, vol. 1, pp. 12, 2017
Authors: Brandon Ginley, Tiffany Emmons, Prabhu Sasankan, Constantin Urban, Brahm H. Segal, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2017: Digital Pathology, 2017
Authors: Brandon Ginley, John E. Tomaszewski, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2017: Digital Pathology, 2017
Authors: Brendon Lutnick, John E. Tomaszewski, Pinaki Sarder
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2017: Digital Pathology, 2017
Authors: Brandon Ginley, John E. Tomaszewski, Rabi Yacoub, Feng Chen, Pinaki Sarder
Keywords: F-test Gabor filtering digital pathology glomerulus texture analysis
Abstract: The glomerulus is the blood filtering unit of the kidney. Each human kidney contains [Formula: see text] glomeruli. Several renal conditions originate from structural damage to glomerular microcompartments, such as proteinuria, the excessive loss of blood proteins into urine. The gold standard for evaluating structural damage in renal pathology is histopathological and immunofluorescence examination of needle biopsies under a light microscope. This method is limited by qualitative or semiquantitative manual scoring approaches to the evaluation of glomerular structural features. Computational quantification of equivalent features promises to improve the precision of glomerular structural analysis. One large obstacle to the computational quantification of renal tissue is the identification of complex glomerular boundaries automatically. To mitigate this issue, we developed a computational pipeline capable of extracting and exactly defining glomerular boundaries. Our method, composed of Gabor filtering, Gaussian blurring, statistical [Formula: see text]-testing, and distance transform, is able to accurately identify glomerular boundaries with mean sensitivity/specificity of [Formula: see text] and accuracy of 0.92, on [Formula: see text] glomeruli images stained with standard renal histological stains. Our method will simplify computational partitioning of glomerular microcompartments hidden within dense textural boundaries. Automatic quantification of glomeruli will streamline structural analysis in clinic and can pioneer real-time diagnoses and interventions for renal care.
PubMedId: 28331889
Journal-article: Journal of Medical Imaging, vol. 4, pp. 021102, 2017
Authors: S.T. Narla, Y-W. Lee, C.A. Benson, P. Sarder, K.J. Brennand, E.K. Stachowiak, M.K. Stachowiak
Keywords: Developmental hypothesis Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Genome regulation Schizophrenia miRNA
Abstract: The watershed-hypothesis of schizophrenia asserts that over 200 different mutations dysregulate distinct pathways that converge on an unspecified common mechanism(s) that controls disease ontogeny. Consistent with this hypothesis, our RNA-sequencing of neuron committed cells (NCCs) differentiated from established iPSCs of 4 schizophrenia patients and 4 control subjects uncovered a dysregulated transcriptome of 1349 mRNAs common to all patients. Data reveals a global dysregulation of developmental genome, deconstruction of coordinated mRNA networks, and the formation of aberrant, new coordinated mRNA networks indicating a concerted action of the responsible factor(s). Sequencing of miRNA transcriptomes demonstrated an overexpression of 16 miRNAs and deconstruction of interactive miRNA-mRNA networks in schizophrenia NCCs. ChiPseq revealed that the nuclear (n) form of FGFR1, a pan-ontogenic regulator, is overexpressed in schizophrenia NCCs and overtargets dysregulated mRNA and miRNA genes. The nFGFR1 targeted 54% of all human gene promoters and 84.4% of schizophrenia dysregulated genes. The upregulated genes reside within major developmental pathways that control neurogenesis and neuron formation, whereas downregulated genes are involved in oligodendrogenesis. Our results indicate (i) an early (preneuronal) genomic etiology of schizophrenia, (ii) dysregulated genes and new coordinated gene networks are common to unrelated cases of schizophrenia, (iii) gene dysregulations are accompanied by increased nFGFR1-genome interactions, and (iv) modeling of increased nFGFR1 by an overexpression of a nFGFR1 lead to up or downregulation of selected genes as observed in schizophrenia NCCs. Together our results designate nFGFR1 signaling as a potential common dysregulated mechanism in investigated patients and potential therapeutic target in schizophrenia.
PubMedId: 28094170
Journal-article: Schizophrenia Research, vol. 185, pp. 17-32, 2017
Authors: Brandon G Ginley, Tiffany Emmons, Brendon Lutnick, Constantin F Urban, Brahm H Segal, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 29259241
Journal Article: Scientific reports, vol. 7, 2017
Authors: Olivier Simon, Rabi Yacoub, Sanjay Jain, John E Tomaszewski, Pinaki Sarder
PubMedId: 29391542
Journal Article: Scientific reports, vol. 8, 2017
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Brandon Ginley, John E. Tomaszewski
Proceedings-article: Medical Imaging 2016: Digital Pathology, 2016
Authors: Elizabeth Ringhausen, Tylon Wang, Jonathan Pitts, Pinaki Sarder, Walter J Akers
Keywords: cancer fluorescence imaging indocyanine green margins oncology projection surgery
Abstract: Open surgery requiring cytoreduction still remains the primary treatment course for many cancers. The extent of resection is vital for the outcome of surgery, greatly affecting patients' follow-up treatment including need for revision surgery in the case of positive margins, choice of chemotherapy, and overall survival. Existing imaging modalities such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography are useful in the diagnostic stage and long-term monitoring but do not provide the level of temporal or spatial resolution needed for intraoperative surgical guidance. Surgeons must instead rely on visual evaluation and palpation in order to distinguish tumors from surrounding tissues. Fluorescence imaging provides high-resolution, real-time mapping with the use of a contrast agent and can greatly enhance intraoperative imaging. Here we demonstrate an intraoperative, real-time fluorescence imaging system for direct highlighting of target tissues for surgical guidance, optical projection of acquired luminescence (OPAL). Image alignment, accuracy, and resolution was determined in vitro prior to demonstration of feasibility for operating room use in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Fluorescence identification of regional lymph nodes after intradermal injection of indocyanine green was performed in pigs with surgical guidance from the OPAL system. Acquired fluorescence images were processed and rapidly reprojected to highlight indocyanine green within the true surgical field. OPAL produced enhanced visualization for resection of lymph nodes at each anatomical location. Results show the optical projection of acquired luminescence system can successfully use fluorescence image capture and projection to provide aligned image data that is invisible to the human eye in the operating room setting.
PubMedId: 26376694
Journal-article: Technology in cancer research & treatment, vol. 15, 2015
Authors: Rebecca C Gilson, Rui Tang, Avik Som, Chloe Klajer, Pinaki Sarder, Gail P Sudlow, Walter J Akers, Samuel Achilefu
Keywords: cancer imaging extracellular pH fluorescence pH-sensitive probe small animal tumor model
Abstract: Enhanced glycolysis and poor perfusion in most solid malignant tumors create an acidic extracellular environment, which enhances tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Complex molecular systems have been explored for imaging and treating these tumors. Here, we report the development of a small molecule, LS662, that emits near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence upon protonation by the extracellular acidic pH environment of diverse solid tumors. Protonation of LS662 induces selective internalization into tumor cells and retention in the tumor microenvironment. Noninvasive NIR imaging demonstrates selective retention of the pH sensor in diverse tumors, and two-photon microscopy of ex vivo tumors reveals significant retention of LS662 in tumor cells and the acid tumor microenvironment. Passive and active internalization processes combine to enhance NIR fluorescence in tumors over time. The low background fluorescence allows tumors to be detected with high sensitivity, as well as dead or dying cells to be delineated from healthy cells. In addition to demonstrating the feasibility of using small molecule pH sensors to image multiple aggressive solid tumor types via a protonation-induced internalization and retention pathway, the study reveals the potential of using LS662 to monitor treatment response and tumor-targeted drug delivery.
PubMedId: 26488921
Journal-article: Molecular pharmaceutics, vol. 12, 2015
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Dolonchampa Maji, Samuel Achilefu
Abstract: Visualization of biological processes and pathologic conditions at the cellular and tissue levels largely relies on the use of fluorescence intensity signals from fluorophores or their bioconjugates. To overcome the concentration dependency of intensity measurements, evaluate subtle molecular interactions, and determine biochemical status of intracellular or extracellular microenvironments, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging has emerged as a reliable imaging method complementary to intensity measurements. Driven by a wide variety of dyes exhibiting stable or environment-responsive FLTs, information multiplexing can be readily accomplished without the need for ratiometric spectral imaging. With knowledge of the fluorescent states of the molecules, it is entirely possible to predict the functional status of biomolecules or microevironment of cells. Whereas the use of FLT spectroscopy and microscopy in biological studies is now well-established, in vivo imaging of biological processes based on FLT imaging techniques is still evolving. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of the FLT of molecular probes for imaging cells and small animal models of human diseases. It also highlights some challenges that continue to limit the full realization of the potential of using FLT molecular probes to address diverse biological problems and outlines areas of potential high impact in the future.
PubMedId: 25961514
Journal-article: Bioconjugate chemistry, vol. 26, 2015
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Walter J. Akers, Gail P. Sudlow, Siavash Yazdanfar, Samuel Achilefu
Proceedings-article: Multiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences XIV, 2014
Authors: Dandan Hu, Pinaki Sarder, Peter Ronhovde, Samuel Achilefu, Zohar Nussinov
Proceedings-article: Three-Dimensional and Multidimensional Microscopy: Image Acquisition and Processing XXI, 2014
Authors: Xiaoxiao Xu, Zhenyu Li, Pinaki Sarder, Nalinikanth Kotagiri, Arye Nehorai
Journal-article: Journal of Micro/Nanolithography, MEMS, and MOEMS, vol. 13, pp. 013017, 2014
Authors: Xiaoxiao Xu, Zhenyu Li, Nalinikanth Kotagiri, Pinaki Sarder, Samuel Achilefu, Arye Nehorai
Proceedings-article: Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems XI, 2013
Authors: Xiaoxiao Xu, Pinaki Sarder, Zhenyu Li, Arye Nehorai
Proceedings-article: Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems XI, 2013
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Kyle Gullicksrud, Suman Mondal, Gail P Sudlow, Samuel Achilefu, Walter J Akers
Abstract: Optical imaging enables real-time visualization of intrinsic and exogenous contrast within biological tissues. Applications in human medicine have demonstrated the power of fluorescence imaging to enhance visualization in dermatology, endoscopic procedures, and open surgery. Although few optical contrast agents are available for human medicine at this time, fluorescence imaging is proving to be a powerful tool in guiding medical procedures. Recently, intraoperative detection of fluorescent molecular probes that target cell-surface receptors has been reported for improvement in oncologic surgery in humans. We have developed a novel system, optical projection of acquired luminescence (OPAL), to further enhance real-time guidance of open oncologic surgery. In this method, collected fluorescence intensity maps are projected onto the imaged surface rather than via wall-mounted display monitor. To demonstrate proof-of-principle for OPAL applications in oncologic surgery, lymphatic transport of indocyanine green was visualized in live mice for intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes. Subsequently, peritoneal tumors in a murine model of breast cancer metastasis were identified using OPAL after systemic administration of a tumor-selective fluorescent molecular probe. These initial results clearly show that OPAL can enhance adoption and ease-of-use of fluorescence imaging in oncologic procedures relative to existing state-of-the-art intraoperative imaging systems.
PubMedId: 24284472
Journal-article: Journal of biomedical optics, vol. 18, 2013
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Siavash Yazdanfar, Walter J Akers, Rui Tang, Gail P Sudlow, Christopher Egbulefu, Samuel Achilefu
Abstract: The era of molecular medicine has ushered in the development of microscopic methods that can report molecular processes in thick tissues with high spatial resolution. A commonality in deep-tissue microscopy is the use of near-infrared (NIR) lasers with single- or multiphoton excitations. However, the relationship between different NIR excitation microscopic techniques and the imaging depths in tissue has not been established. We compared such depth limits for three NIR excitation techniques: NIR single-photon confocal microscopy (NIR SPCM), NIR multiphoton excitation with visible detection (NIR/VIS MPM), and all-NIR multiphoton excitation with NIR detection (NIR/NIR MPM). Homologous cyanine dyes provided the fluorescence. Intact kidneys were harvested after administration of kidney-clearing cyanine dyes in mice. NIR SPCM and NIR/VIS MPM achieved similar maximum imaging depth of 100 m. The NIR/NIR MPM enabled greater than fivefold imaging depth (>500 m) using the harvested kidneys. Although the NIR/NIR MPM used 1550-nm excitation where water absorption is relatively high, cell viability and histology studies demonstrate that the laser did not induce photothermal damage at the low laser powers used for the kidney imaging. This study provides guidance on the imaging depth capabilities of NIR excitation-based microscopic techniques and reveals the potential to multiplex information using these platforms.
PubMedId: 24150231
Journal-article: Journal of biomedical optics, vol. 18, 2013
Authors: D Hu, P Sarder, P Ronhovde, S Orthaus, S Achilefu, Z Nussinov
Keywords: Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy multiresolution community detection spectral clustering
Abstract: Inspired by a multiresolution community detection based network segmentation method, we suggest an automatic method for segmenting fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging microscopy (FLIM) images of cells in a first pilot investigation on two selected images. The image processing problem is framed as identifying segments with respective average FLTs against the background in FLIM images. The proposed method segments a FLIM image for a given resolution of the network defined using image pixels as the nodes and similarity between the FLTs of the pixels as the edges. In the resulting segmentation, low network resolution leads to larger segments, and high network resolution leads to smaller segments. Furthermore, using the proposed method, the mean-square error in estimating the FLT segments in a FLIM image was found to consistently decrease with increasing resolution of the corresponding network. The multiresolution community detection method appeared to perform better than a popular spectral clustering-based method in performing FLIM image segmentation. At high resolution, the spectral segmentation method introduced noisy segments in its output, and it was unable to achieve a consistent decrease in mean-square error with increasing resolution.
PubMedId: 24251410
Journal-article: Journal of microscopy, vol. 253, 2012
Authors: Xiaoxiao Xu, Pinaki Sarder, Nalinikanth Kotagiri, Samuel Achilefu, Arye Nehorai
Abstract: Position-encoded microsphere arrays are a promising technology for identifying biological targets and quantifying their concentrations. In this paper we analyze the statistical performance of these arrays in imaging targets at typical low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. We compute the Ziv-Zakai bound (ZZB) on the errors in estimating the unknown parameters, including the target concentrations. We find the SNR level below which the ZZB provides a more accurate prediction of the error than the posterior Cramr-Rao bound (PCRB), through numerical examples. We further apply the ZZB to select the optimal design parameters of the microsphere array device and investigate the effects of the experimental variables such as microscope point-spread function. An imaging experiment on microspheres with protein targets verifies the optimal design parameters using the ZZB.
PubMedId: 23268386
Journal-article: IEEE transactions on nanobioscience, vol. 12, 2012
Authors: Xiaoxiao Xu, Pinaki Sarder, Zhenyu Li, Arye Nehorai
Abstract: Microarray devices are powerful for detecting and analyzing biological targets. However, the potential of these devices may not be fully realized due to the lack of optimization of their design and implementation. In this work, we consider a microsphere-trap array device by employing microfluidic techniques and a hydrodynamic trapping mechanism. We design a novel geometric structure of the trap array in the device, and develop a comprehensive and robust framework to optimize the values of the geometric parameters to maximize the microsphere arrays' packing density. We also simultaneously optimize multiple criteria, such as efficiently immobilizing a single microsphere in each trap, effectively eliminating fluidic errors such as channel clogging and multiple microspheres in a single trap, minimizing errors in subsequent imaging experiments, and easily recovering targets. We use finite element simulations to validate the trapping mechanism of the device, and to study the effects of the optimization geometric parameters. We further perform microsphere-trapping experiments using the optimized device and a device with randomly selected geometric parameters, which we denote as the un-optimized device. These experiments demonstrate easy control of the transportation and manipulation of the microspheres in the optimized device. They also show that the optimized device greatly outperforms the un-optimized device by increasing the packing density by a factor of two, improving the microsphere trapping efficiency from 58% to 99%, and reducing fluidic errors from 48% to a negligible level (less than 1%). The optimization framework lays the foundation for the future goal of developing a modular, reliable, efficient, and inexpensive lab-on-a-chip system.
PubMedId: 24404004
Journal-article: Biomicrofluidics, vol. 7, 2012
Authors: R Nothdurft, P Sarder, S Bloch, J Culver, S Achilefu
Abstract: Although single-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is widely used to image molecular processes using a wide range of excitation wavelengths, the captured emission of this technique is confined to the visible spectrum. Here, we explore the feasibility of utilizing near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes with emission >700 nm for FLIM of live cells. The confocal microscope is equipped with a 785 nm laser diode, a red-enhanced photomultiplier tube, and a time-correlated single photon counting card. We demonstrate that our system reports the lifetime distributions of NIR fluorescent dyes, cypate and DTTCI, in cells. In cells labelled separately or jointly with these dyes, NIR FLIM successfully distinguishes their lifetimes, providing a method to sort different cell populations. In addition, lifetime distributions of cells co-incubated with these dyes allow estimate of the dyes' relative concentrations in complex cellular microenvironments. With the heightened interest in fluorescence lifetime-based small animal imaging using NIR fluorophores, this technique further serves as a bridge between in vitro spectroscopic characterization of new fluorophore lifetimes and in vivo tissue imaging.
PubMedId: 22788550
Journal-article: Journal of microscopy, vol. 247, 2012
Authors: Xiaoxiao Xu, Pinaki Sarder, Arye Nehorai
Proceedings-article: 2011 Conference Record of the Forty Fifth Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers (ASILOMAR), 2011
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Arye Nehorai
Abstract: We propose a microsphere array device with microspheres having controllable positions for error-free target identification. We conduct a statistical design analysis to select the optimal distance between the microspheres as well as the optimal temperature. Our design simplifies the imaging and ensures a desired statistical performance for a given sensor cost. Specifically, we compute the posterior Cramr-Rao bound on the errors in estimating the unknown target concentrations. We use this performance bound to compute the optimal design variables. We discuss both uniform and sparse concentration levels of targets, and replace the unknown imaging parameters with their maximum likelihood estimates. We illustrate our design concept using numerical examples. The proposed microarray has high sensitivity, efficient packing, and guaranteed imaging performance. It simplifies the imaging analysis significantly by identifying targets based on the known positions of the microspheres. Potential applications include molecular recognition, specificity of targeting molecules, protein-protein dimerization, high throughput screening assays for enzyme inhibitors, drug discovery, and gene sequencing.
PubMedId: 21342857
Journal-article: IEEE transactions on nanobioscience, vol. 10, 2011
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Weixiong Zhang, J. Perren Cobb, Arye Nehorai
Book-chapter: Link Mining: Models, Algorithms, and Applications, pp. 557-568, 2010
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, William Schierding, J Perren Cobb, Arye Nehorai
Abstract: In this paper, we propose a gene regulatory network (GRN) estimation method, which assumes that such networks are typically sparse, using time-series microarray datasets. We represent the regulatory relationships between the genes using weights, with the "net" regulation influence on a gene's expression being the summation of the independent regulatory inputs. We estimate the weights using a Bayesian linear regression method for sparse parameter vectors. We apply our proposed method to the extraction of differential gene expression software selected genes of a human buffy-coat microarray expression profile dataset of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and compare the estimation result with the GRNs estimated using both a correlation coefficient method and a database-based method ingenuity pathway analysis. A biological analysis of the resulting consensus network that is derived using the GRNs, estimated with both our and the correlation-coefficient methods results in four biologically meaningful subnetworks. Also, our method performs either better than or competitively with the existing well-established GRN estimation methods. Moreover, it performs comparatively with respect to: 1) the ground-truth GRNs for the in silico 50- and 100-gene datasets reported recently in the DREAM3 challenge and 2) the GRN estimated using a mutual information-based method for the top-ranked Bayesian analysis of time series (a Bayesian user-friendly software for analyzing time-series microarray experiments) selected genes of the VAP dataset.
PubMedId: 20650703
Journal-article: IEEE transactions on nanobioscience, vol. 9, 2010
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Arye Nehorai
Abstract: We develop a maximum likelihood (ML)-based parametric image deconvolution technique to locate quantum-dot (q-dot) encoded microparticles from three-dimensional (3-D) images of an ultra-high density 3-D microarray. A potential application of the proposed microarray imaging is assay analysis of gene, protein, antigen, and antibody targets. This imaging is performed using a wide-field fluorescence microscope. We first describe our problem of interest and the pertinent measurement model by assuming additive Gaussian noise. We use a 3-D Gaussian point-spread-function (PSF) model to represent the blurring of the widefield microscope system. We employ parametric spheres to represent the light intensity profiles of the q-dot-encoded microparticles. We then develop the estimation algorithm for the single-sphere-object image assuming that the microscope PSF is totally unknown. The algorithm is tested numerically and compared with the analytical Cramr-Rao bounds (CRB). To apply our analysis to real data, we first segment a section of the blurred 3-D image of the multiple microparticles using a k-means clustering algorithm, obtaining 3-D images of single-sphere-objects. Then, we process each of these images using our proposed estimation technique. In the numerical examples, our method outperforms the blind deconvolution (BD) algorithms in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) images. For the case of real data, our method and the BD-based methods perform similarly for the well-separated microparticle images.
PubMedId: 19203872
Journal-article: IEEE transactions on nanobioscience, vol. 7, 2009
Authors: Pinaki Sarder, Arye Nehorai
Proceedings-article: 2009 3rd IEEE International Workshop on Computational Advances in Multi-Sensor Adaptive Processing (CAMSAP), 2009
Authors: P Sarder, A Nehorai, P H Davis, S L Stanley
Abstract: In oligonucleotide microarray experiments, noise is a challenging problem, as biologists now are studying their organisms not in isolation but in the context of a natural environment. In low photomultiplier tube (PMT) voltage images, weak gene signals and their interactions with the background fluorescence noise are most problematic. In addition, nonspecific sequences bind to array spots intermittently causing inaccurate measurements. Conventional techniques cannot precisely separate the foreground and the background signals. In this paper, we propose analytically based estimation technique. We assume a priori spot-shape information using a circular outer periphery with an elliptical center hole. We assume Gaussian statistics for modeling both the foreground and background signals. The mean of the foreground signal quantifies the weak gene signal corresponding to the spot, and the variance gives the measure of the undesired binding that causes fluctuation in the measurement. We propose a foreground-signal and shape-estimation algorithm using the Gibbs sampling method. We compare our developed algorithm with the existing Mann-Whitney (MW)- and expectation maximization (EM)/iterated conditional modes (ICM)-based methods. Our method outperforms the existing methods with considerably smaller mean-square error (MSE) for all signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in computer-generated images and gives better qualitative results in low-SNR real-data images. Our method is computationally relatively slow because of its inherent sampling operation and hence only applicable to very noisy-spot images. In a realistic example using our method, we show that the gene-signal fluctuations on the estimated foreground are better observed for the input noisy images with relatively higher undesired bindings.
PubMedId: 18556262
Journal-article: IEEE transactions on nanobioscience, vol. 7, 2008
Authors: P. Sarder, A. Nehorai
Journal-article: IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, vol. 23, pp. 32-45, 2006
Authors: P. Sarder, A. Nehorai
Proceedings-article: Fourth IEEE Workshop on Sensor Array and Multichannel Processing, 2006.,
Authors: P. Sarder, A. Nehorai
Proceedings-article: IEEE Workshop Sensor Array and Multichannel Signal Processing, 2006.,
Presented by CUBS © 2022