UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Timothy F. Murphy UB Profile
Medicine
SUNY Distinguished Professor
Senior Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research
Director, Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Director, Community Health Equity Research Institute
Clinical and Translational Research Center
875 Ellicott St.
Room 6091
Buffalo NY 14203
716-881-8911
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Shyamashree Sinha, Gale R Burstein, Kenneth E Leonard, Timothy F Murphy, Peter L Elkin
PubMedId: 29295165
Journal Article: Studies in health technology and informatics, vol. 245, 2018
Authors: David M Jacobs, Katia Noyes, Jiwei Zhao, Walter Gibson, Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi, Heather M Ochs-Balcom
PubMedId: 29611719
Journal-article: Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 2018
Authors: Brian T. Tsuji, James Fisher, Raheal Boadi-Yeboah, Patricia N. Holden, Sanjay Sethi, Melinda M. Pettigrew, Timothy F. Murphy
PubMedId: 29180527
Journal-article: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, vol. 62, pp. e01995-17, 2017
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Charmaine Kirkham, Mary C Gallo, Yang Yang, Gregory E Wilding, Melinda M Pettigrew
PubMedId: 28968876
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 216, pp. 1295-1302, 2017
Authors: Antonia C. Perez, Timothy F. Murphy
PubMedId: 28853985
Journal-article: Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, vol. 13, pp. 2322-2331, 2017
Authors: Dabin Ren, Timothy F. Murphy, Eric R. Lafontaine, Michael E. Pichichero
PubMedId: 28848555
Journal-article: Frontiers in Immunology, vol. 8, 2017
Authors: Dabin Ren, Anthony L. Almudevar, Timothy F. Murphy, Eric R. Lafontaine, Anthony A. Campagnari, Nicole Luke-Marshall, Michael E. Pichichero
Journal-article: Vaccine, 2017
Authors: Christian P. Ahearn, Mary C. Gallo, Timothy F. Murphy
PubMedId: 28449098
Journal-article: Pathogens and Disease, vol. 75, 2017
Authors: Melinda M Pettigrew, Mark R Alderson, Lauren O Bakaletz, Stephen J Barenkamp, Anders P Hakansson, Kevin M Mason, Johanna Nokso-Koivisto, Janak Patel, Stephen I Pelton, Timothy F Murphy
PubMedId: 28372533
Journal Article: Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 156, 2017
Authors: Antonia C. Perez, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Vaccine, 2017
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Charmaine Kirkham, Antoinette Johnson, Aimee L Brauer, Mary Koszelak-Rosenblum, Michael G Malkowski
Keywords: ABC transporter protein Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Moraxella catarrhalis Otitis media Substrate binding protein Vaccine
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis causes otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections would have an enormous impact globally in preventing morbidity caused by M. catarrhalis in these populations. Using a genome mining approach we have identified a sulfate binding protein, CysP, of an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter system as a novel candidate vaccine antigen. CysP expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface and is highly conserved among strains. Immunization with CysP induces potentially protective immune responses in a murine pulmonary clearance model. In view of these features that indicate CysP is a promising vaccine antigen, we conducted further studies to elucidate its function. These studies demonstrated that CysP binds sulfate and thiosulfate ions, plays a nutritional role for the organism and functions in intracellular survival of M. catarrhalis in human respiratory epithelial cells. The observations that CysP has features of a vaccine antigen and also plays an important role in growth and survival of the organism indicate that CysP is an excellent candidate vaccine antigen to prevent M. catarrhalis otitis media and infections in adults with COPD.
PubMedId: 27265455
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 34, 2016
Authors: Taketo Otsuka, Charmaine Kirkham, Aimee Brauer, Mary Koszelak-Rosenblum, Michael G Malkowski, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is an exclusively human pathogen that is an important cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections would have an enormous global impact in reducing morbidity resulting from these infections. Substrate binding protein 2 (SBP2) of an ABC transporter system has recently been identified as a promising vaccine candidate antigen on the bacterial surface of M. catarrhalis. In this study, we showed that SBP1, -2, and -3 individually bind different basic amino acids with exquisite specificity. We engineered mutants that each expressed a single SBP from this gene cluster and showed in growth experiments that SBP1, -2, and -3 serve a nutritional function through acquisition of amino acids for the bacterium. SBP2 mediates uptake of arginine, a strict growth requirement of M. catarrhalis. Adherence and invasion assays demonstrated that SBP1 and SBP3 play a role in invasion of human respiratory epithelial cells, consistent with a nutritional role in intracellular survival in the human respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that the SBPs of an ABC transporter system function in the uptake of basic amino acids to support growth of M. catarrhalis. The critical role of SBP2 in arginine uptake may contribute to its potential as a vaccine antigen.
PubMedId: 26597985
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 84, 2015
Authors: Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years.
PubMedId: 25787137
Journal-article: Clinical and vaccine immunology : CVI, vol. 22, 2015
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Charmaine Kirkham, Megan M Jones, Sanjay Sethi, Yong Kong, Melinda M Pettigrew
Keywords: Haemophilus influenzae IgA protease airway infection chronic obstructive pulmonary disease endopeptidase exacerbation of COPD respiratory tract colonization respiratory tract infection
Abstract: Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways.
PubMedId: 25995193
Journal-article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 212, 2015
Authors: Megan M Jones, Antoinette Johnson, Mary Koszelak-Rosenblum, Charmaine Kirkham, Aimee L Brauer, Michael G Malkowski, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is a strict human pathogen that causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, resulting in significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. M. catarrhalis has a growth requirement for arginine; thus, acquiring arginine is important for fitness and survival. M. catarrhalis has a putative oligopeptide permease ABC transport operon (opp) consisting of five genes (oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA), encoding two permeases, two ATPases, and a substrate binding protein. Thermal shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein OppA binds to peptides 3 to 16 amino acid residues in length regardless of the amino acid composition. A mutant in which the oppBCDFA gene cluster is knocked out showed impaired growth in minimal medium where the only source of arginine came from a peptide 5 to 10 amino acid residues in length. Whether methylated arginine supports growth of M. catarrhalis is important in understanding fitness in the respiratory tract because methylated arginine is abundant in host tissues. No growth of wild-type M. catarrhalis was observed in minimal medium in which arginine was present only in methylated form, indicating that the bacterium requires l-arginine. An oppA knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the Opp system mediates both uptake of peptides and fitness in the respiratory tract.
PubMedId: 25156736
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 82, 2014
Authors: Taketo Otsuka, Charmaine Kirkham, Antoinette Johnson, Megan M Jones, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is a common respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media in children and infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Since the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines with/without protein D of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, M. catarrhalis has become a high-priority pathogen in otitis media. For the development of antibacterial vaccines and therapies, substrate binding proteins of ATP-binding cassette transporters are important targets. In this study, we identified and characterized a substrate binding protein, SBP2, of M. catarrhalis. Among 30 clinical isolates tested, the sbp2 gene sequence was highly conserved. In 2 different analyses (whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and flow cytometry), polyclonal antibodies raised to recombinant SBP2 demonstrated that SBP2 expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface of the wild type but not the sbp2 mutant. Mice immunized with recombinant SBP2 showed significantly enhanced clearance of M. catarrhalis from the lung compared to that in the control group at both 25-g and 50-g doses (P < 0.001). We conclude that SBP2 is a novel, attractive candidate as a vaccine antigen against M. catarrhalis.
PubMedId: 24914218
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 82, 2014
Authors: Y. J. Huang, S. Sethi, T. Murphy, S. Nariya, H. A. Boushey, S. V. Lynch
Abstract: Specific bacterial species are implicated in the pathogenesis of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, recent studies of clinically stable COPD patients have demonstrated a greater diversity of airway microbiota, whose role in acute exacerbations is unclear. In this study, temporal changes in the airway microbiome before, at the onset of, and after an acute exacerbation were examined in 60 sputum samples collected from subjects enrolled in a longitudinal study of bacterial infection in COPD. Microbiome composition and predicted functions were examined using 16S rRNA-based culture-independent profiling methods. Shifts in the abundance ( 2-fold, P < 0.05) of many taxa at exacerbation and after treatment were observed. Microbiota members that were increased at exacerbation were primarily of the Proteobacteria phylum, including nontypical COPD pathogens. Changes in the bacterial composition after treatment for an exacerbation differed significantly among the therapy regimens clinically prescribed (antibiotics only, oral corticosteroids only, or both). Treatment with antibiotics alone primarily decreased the abundance of Proteobacteria, with the prolonged suppression of some microbiota members being observed. In contrast, treatment with corticosteroids alone led to enrichment for Proteobacteria and members of other phyla. Predicted metagenomes of particular microbiota members involved in these compositional shifts indicated exacerbation-associated loss of functions involved in the synthesis of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory products, alongside enrichment in functions related to pathogen-elicited inflammation. These trends reversed upon clinical recovery. Further larger studies will be necessary to determine whether specific compositional or functional changes detected in the airway microbiome could be useful indicators of exacerbation development or outcome.
PubMedId: 24850358
Journal-article: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 52, pp. 2813-2823, 2014
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Aimee L Brauer, Charmaine Kirkham, Antoinette Johnson, Mary Koszelak-Rosenblum, Michael G Malkowski
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We have identified and characterized a zinc uptake ABC transporter that is present in all strains of M. catarrhalis tested. A mutant in which the znu gene cluster is knocked out shows markedly impaired growth compared to the wild type in medium that contains trace zinc; growth is restored to wild-type levels by supplementing medium with zinc but not with other divalent cations. Thermal-shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein ZnuA binds zinc but does not bind other divalent cations. Invasion assays with human respiratory epithelial cells demonstrated that the zinc ABC transporter of M. catarrhalis is critical for invasion of respiratory epithelial cells, an observation that is especially relevant because an intracellular reservoir of M. catarrhalis is present in the human respiratory tract and this reservoir is important for persistence. The znu knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the zinc uptake ABC transporter mediates uptake of zinc in environments with very low zinc concentrations and is critical for full virulence of M. catarrhalis in the respiratory tract in facilitating intracellular invasion of epithelial cells and persistence in the respiratory tract.
PubMedId: 23817618
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 81, 2013
Authors: Stephen I Pelton, Melinda M Pettigrew, Stephen J Barenkamp, Fabrice Godfroid, Carlos G Grijalva, Amanda Leach, Janak Patel, Timothy F Murphy, Sanja Selak, Lauren O Bakaletz
Abstract: To update progress on the effectiveness of vaccine for prevention of acute otitis media (AOM) and identification of promising candidate antigens against Streptococcus pneumoniae, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Literature searches were performed in OvidSP and PubMed restricted to articles published between June 2007 and September 2011. Search terms included otitis media, vaccines, vaccine antigens, and each of the otitis pathogens and candidate antigens identified in the ninth conference report. The current report provides further evidence for the effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in the prevention of otitis media. Observational studies demonstrate a greater decline in AOM episodes than reported in clinical efficacy trials. Unmet challenges include extending protection to additional serotypes and additional pathogens, the need to prevent early episodes, the development of correlates of protection for protein antigens, and the need to define where an otitis media vaccine strategy fits with priorities for child health. Acute otitis media continues to be a burden on children and families, especially those who suffer from frequent recurrences. The 7-valent PCV (PCV7) has reduced the burden of disease as well as shifted the pneumococcal serotypes and the distribution of otopathogens currently reported in children with AOM. Antibiotic resistance remains an ongoing challenge. Multiple candidate antigens have demonstrated the necessary requirements of conservation, surface exposure, immunogenicity, and protection in animal models. Further research on the role of each antigen in pathogenesis, in the development of correlates of protection in animal models, and in new adjuvants to elicit responses in the youngest infants is likely to be productive and permit more antigens to move into human clinical trials.
PubMedId: 23536534
Journal-article: Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 148, 2013
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Tasnee Chonmaitree, Stephen Barenkamp, Jennelle Kyd, Johanna Nokso-Koivisto, Janak A Patel, Terho Heikkinen, Noboru Yamanaka, Pearay Ogra, W Edward Swords, Tania Sih, Melinda M Pettigrew
Abstract: The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature from January 2007 through June 2011 on the virology, bacteriology, and immunology related to otitis media. PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Three subpanels with co-chairs comprising experts in the virology, bacteriology, and immunology of otitis media were formed. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a second draft was created. The entire panel met at the 10th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2011 and discussed the review and refined the content further. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by the panel. Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing an understanding of the microbiology and immunology of otitis media. Advances include laboratory-based basic studies, cell-based assays, work in animal models, and clinical studies. The advances of the past 4 years formed the basis of a series of short-term and long-term research goals in an effort to guide the field. Accomplishing these goals will provide opportunities for the development of novel interventions, including new ways to better treat and prevent otitis media.
PubMedId: 23536533
Journal-article: Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 148, 2013
Authors: Cara F. Clementi, Anders P. H??kansson, Timothy F. Murphy
PubMedId: 24218477
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 82, pp. 433-444, 2013
Authors: Lixin Zhang, Jingping Xie, Mayuri Patel, Arsala Bakhtyar, Garth D Ehrlich, Azad Ahmed, Josh Earl, Carl F Marrs, Daniel Clemans, Timothy F Murphy, Janet R Gilsdorf
Abstract: Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) colonizes the human respiratory tract and is an important pathogen associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Bacterial factors that interact with the human host may be important in the pathogenesis of COPD. These factors, however, have not been well defined. The overall goal of this study was to identify bacterial genetic elements with increased prevalence among H. influenzae strains isolated from patients with COPD compared to those isolated from the pharynges of healthy individuals. Four nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) strains, two isolated from the airways of patients with COPD and two from a healthy individual, were subjected to whole genome sequencing using 454 FLX Titanium technology. COPD strain-specific genetic islands greater than 500 bp in size were identified by in silico subtraction. Open reading frames residing within these islands include known Hi virulence genes such as lic2b, hgbA, iga, hmw1 and hmw2, as well as genes encoding urease and other enzymes involving metabolic pathways. The distributions of seven selected genetic islands were assessed among a panel of 421 NTHi strains of both disease and commensal origins using a Library-on-a-Slide high throughput dot blot DNA hybridization procedure. Four of the seven islands screened, containing genes that encode a methyltransferase, a dehydrogenase, a urease synthesis enzyme, and a set of unknown short ORFs, respectively, were more prevalent in COPD strains than in colonizing strains with prevalence ratios ranging from 1.21 to 2.85 (p 0.0002). Surprisingly, none of these sequences show increased prevalence among NTHi isolated from the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis. Our data suggest that specific bacterial genes, many involved in metabolic functions, are associated with the ability of NTHi strains to survive in the lower airways of patients with COPD.
PubMedId: 22970300
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 7, 2012
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Catherine Wrona, Ellana Eberhardt, Lori Grove, Ganapathi I. Parameswaran, Timothy Murphy
Proceedings-article: C45. EXACERBATIONS OF COPD: SUSCEPTIBILITY AND PATHOGENESIS, 2012
Authors: Ganapathi I. Parameswaran, Timothy F. Murphy, Jingjing Yin, Lori Grove, Ellana Eberhardt, Charles Berenson, Sanjay Sethi
Proceedings-article: B103. COPD: MECHANISMS OF DISEASE PROGRESSION AND EXACERBATION, 2012
Authors: Muhammad O. Jamil, Jingjing Yin, Namrata Nag, Ellana Eberhardt, Lori Grove, Iyer Parameswaran, Timothy Murphy, Sanjay Sethi
Proceedings-article: D105. COPD: PHENOTYPES AND OUTCOMES, 2012
Authors: Ganapathi I. Parameswaran, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F. Murphy
Proceedings-article: C13. MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN EXACERBATION OF ASTHMA AND COPD, 2012
Authors: Suzanne J. C. Verhaegh, Kim Stol, Corn?? P. de Vogel, Kristian Riesbeck, Eric R. Lafontaine, Timothy F. Murphy, Alex van Belkum, Peter W. M. Hermans, John P. Hays
PubMedId: 22539468
Journal-article: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, vol. 19, pp. 914-918, 2012
Authors: Aarti Agrawal, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: The widespread use of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines has nearly eradicated invasive Hib disease where the vaccines are used. This success was accompanied by a shift in capsular serotypes of invasive H. influenzae disease, with nontypeable strains replacing type b strains as the most common bloodstream isolate, but there is no convincing evidence of a true increase in the incidence of non-serotype b invasive infections. H. influenzae causes predominantly mucosal infections. The introduction of vaccines for otitis media and global shifts in antimicrobial susceptibility emphasize the importance of continued surveillance of H. influenzae colonization and disease patterns.
PubMedId: 21900515
Journal-article: Journal of clinical microbiology, vol. 49, 2011
Authors: Ganapathi Iyer Parameswaran, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Pathogenic bacteria colonize the airways of 30% to 40% of patients with COPD and cause approximately 50% of exacerbations. New strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) and Moraxella catarrhalis are associated with exacerbations. Antimicrobial protein/peptides (AMPs) play important roles in innate lung defense against pathogens. To our knowledge, the changes in AMP baseline levels in respiratory secretions during bacterial colonization and exacerbation have not been described. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of the acquisition of a new strain of pathogenic bacteria on the airway levels of AMPs in patients with COPD. One hundred fifty-three samples from 11 patients were selected from COPD sputum samples collected prospectively over 6 years. Samples were grouped as culture-negative (no pathogenic bacteria), colonization, and exacerbation due to new strains of NTHI and M catarrhalis. Levels of lysozyme, lactoferrin, LL-37, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared among groups by paired analysis. Compared with baseline, sputum lysozyme levels were significantly lower during colonization and exacerbation by NTHI (P = .001 and P = .013, respectively) and M catarrhalis (P = .007 and P = .018, respectively); SLPI levels were lower with exacerbation due to NTHI and M catarrhalis (P = .002 and P = .004, respectively), and during colonization by M catarrhalis (P = 032). Lactoferrin levels did not change significantly; LL-37 levels were higher during exacerbation by NTHI and M catarrhalis (P = .001 and P = .018, respectively). Acquisition of NTHI and M catarrhalis is associated with significant changes in airway levels of AMPs, with larger changes in exacerbation. Airway AMP levels are likely to be important in pathogen clearance and clinical outcomes of infection in COPD.
PubMedId: 21349930
Journal-article: Chest, vol. 140, 2011
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Aimee L Brauer
Abstract: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a common cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infection in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prior studies have shown that H. influenzae expresses abundant urease during growth in the middle ear of the chinchilla and in pooled human sputum, suggesting that expression of urease is important for colonization and infection in the hostile environments of the middle ear and in the airways in adults. Virtually nothing else is known about the urease of H. influenzae, which was characterized in the present study. Analysis by reverse transcriptase PCR revealed that the ure gene cluster is expressed as a single transcript. Knockout mutants of a urease structural gene (ureC) and of the entire ure operon demonstrated no detectable urease activity indicating that this operon is the only one encoding an active urease. The ure operon is present in all strains tested, including clinical isolates from otitis media and COPD. Urease activity decreased as nitrogen availability increased. To test the hypothesis that urease is expressed during human infection, purified recombinant urease C was used in ELISA with pre acquisition and post infection serum from adults with COPD who experienced infections caused by H. influenzae. A total of 28% of patients developed new antibodies following infection indicating that H. influenzae expresses urease during airway infection. Bacterial viability assays performed at varying pH indicate that urease mediates survival of H. influenzae in an acid environment. The H. influenzae genome contains a single urease operon that mediates urease expression and that is present in all clinical isolates tested. Nitrogen availability is a determinant of urease expression. H. influenzae expresses urease during human respiratory tract infection and urease is a target of the human antibody response. Expression of urease enhances viability in an acid environment. Taken together, these observations suggest that urease is important for survival and replication of H. influenzae in the human respiratory tract.
PubMedId: 21843372
Journal-article: BMC microbiology, vol. 11, 2011
Authors: Amit A Lugade, Anna Bianchi-Smiraglia, Vandana Pradhan, Galina Elkin, Timothy F Murphy, Yasmin Thanavala
Abstract: The cross-talk between the innate and the adaptive immune system is facilitated by the initial interaction of antigen with dendritic cells. As DCs express a large array of TLRs, evidence has accumulated that engagement of these molecules contributes to the activation of adaptive immunity. We have evaluated the immunostimulatory role of the highly-conserved outer membrane lipoprotein P6 from non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) to determine whether the presence of the lipid motif plays a critical role on its immunogenicity. We undertook a systematic analysis of the role that the lipid motif plays in the activation of DCs and the subsequent stimulation of antigen-specific T and B cells. To facilitate our studies, recombinant P6 protein that lacked the lipid motif was generated. Mice immunized with non-lipidated rP6 were unable to elicit high titers of anti-P6 Ig. Expression of the lipid motif on P6 was also required for proliferation and cytokine secretion by antigen-specific T cells. Upregulation of T cell costimulatory molecules was abrogated in DCs exposed to non-lipidated rP6 and in TLR2(-/-) DCs exposed to native P6, thereby resulting in diminished adaptive immune responses. Absence of either the lipid motif on the antigen or TLR2 expression resulted in diminished cytokine production from stimulated DCs. Collectively, our data suggest that the lipid motif of the lipoprotein antigen is essential for triggering TLR2 signaling and effective stimulation of APCs. Our studies establish the pivotal role of a bacterial lipid motif on activating both innate and adaptive immune responses to an otherwise poorly immunogenic protein antigen.
PubMedId: 21611194
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 6, 2011
Authors: Ilya G. Berim, Alan J. Lesse, Ellana Eberhardt, Lori J. Grove, Catherine Wrona, Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi
Proceedings-article: B93. COPD EXACERBATIONS: IMPACT OF BACTERIAL AND VIRAL INFECTIONS, 2011
Authors: Ganapathi I. Parameswaran, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F. Murphy
Proceedings-article: C41. INNATE IMMUNITY, 2011
Authors: Himanshu D. Desai, Brydon Grant, Karen Eschberger, Aarti Agrawal, Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi
Proceedings-article: B93. COPD EXACERBATIONS: IMPACT OF BACTERIAL AND VIRAL INFECTIONS, 2011
Authors: Suzanne J.C. Verhaegh, Corn?? P. de Vogel, Kristian Riesbeck, Eric R. Lafontaine, Timothy F. Murphy, Henri A. Verbrugh, Vincent W.V. Jaddoe, Albert Hofman, Henri??tte A. Moll, Alex van Belkum, John P. Hays
PubMedId: 21704103
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 29, pp. 5603-5610, 2011
Authors: Gerd D??ring, Iyer G. Parameswaran, Timothy F. Murphy
PubMedId: 20584083
Journal-article: FEMS Microbiology Reviews, vol. 35, pp. 124-146, 2011
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy, Alan J. Lesse, Charmaine Kirkham, Huachun Zhong, Sanjay Sethi, Robert S. Munson
Abstract: Strains of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae show enormous genetic heterogeneity and display differential virulence potential in different clinical settings. The igaB gene, which encodes a newly identified IgA protease, is more likely to be present in the genome of COPD strains of H. influenzae than in otitis media strains. Analysis of igaB and surrounding sequences in the present study showed that H. influenzae likely acquired igaB from Neisseria meningitidis and that the acquisition was accompanied by a ~20 kb genomic inversion that is present only in strains that have igaB. As part of a long running prospective study of COPD, molecular typing of H. influenzae strains identified a clonally related group of strains, a surprising observation given the genetic heterogeneity that characterizes strains of nontypeable H. influenzae. Analysis of strains by 5 independent methods (polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, igaB gene sequences, P2 gene sequences, pulsed field gel electrophoresis) established the clonal relationship among the strains. Analysis of 134 independent strains collected prospectively from a cohort of adults with COPD demonstrated that ~10% belonged to the clonal group. We conclude that a clonally related group of strains of nontypeable H. influenzae that has two IgA1 protease genes (iga and igaB) is adapted for colonization and infection in COPD. This observation has important implications in understanding population dynamics of H. influenzae in human infection and in understanding virulence mechanisms specifically in the setting of COPD.
PubMedId: 21998721
Journal-article: PLoS ONE, vol. 6, pp. e25923, 2011
Authors: Min Yang, Antoinette Johnson, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is a common cause of otitis media in children and of lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; therefore, these two groups would benefit from a vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections. A genome mining approach for vaccine antigens identified oligopeptide permease protein A (OppA), an oligopeptide binding protein of an apparent oligopeptide transport system. Analysis of the oppA gene by PCR and sequence analysis revealed that OppA is highly conserved among clinical isolates of M. catarrhalis. Recombinant OppA was expressed as a lipoprotein and purified, and an oppA knockout mutant was constructed. Antiserum raised to recombinant purified OppA recognized epitopes on the bacterial surface of the wild type but not the OppA knockout mutant. Antibodies raised to purified recombinant OppA recognized native OppA in multiple strains. Intranasal immunization of mice induced systemic and mucosal antibodies to OppA and resulted in enhanced clearance of M. catarrhalis in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. OppA is a highly conserved, immunogenic protein that expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface and that induces potentially protective immune responses in a mouse model. OppA should be evaluated further as a vaccine antigen for M. catarrhalis.
PubMedId: 21134967
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 79, 2010
Authors: Shigeki Nakamura, Mikhail Shchepetov, Ankur B Dalia, Sarah E Clark, Timothy F Murphy, Sanjay Sethi, Janet R Gilsdorf, Arnold L Smith, Jeffery N Weiser
Abstract: Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a common commensal of the human pharynx, is also an opportunistic pathogen if it becomes established in the lower respiratory tract (LRT). In comparison to colonizing isolates from the upper airway, LRT isolates, especially those associated with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, have increased resistance to the complement- and antibody-dependent, bactericidal effect of serum. To define the molecular basis of this resistance, mutants constructed in a serum resistant strain using the mariner transposon were screened for loss of survival in normal human serum. The loci required for serum resistance contribute to the structure of the exposed surface of the bacterial outer membrane. These included loci involved in biosynthesis of the oligosaccharide component of lipooligosaccharide (LOS), and vacJ, which functions with an ABC transporter encoded by yrb genes in retrograde trafficking of phospholipids from the outer to inner leaflet of the cell envelope. Mutations in vacJ and yrb genes reduced the stability of the outer membrane and were associated with increased cell surface hyrophobicity and phospholipid content. Loss of serum resistance in vacJ and yrb mutants correlated with increased binding of natural immunoglobulin M in serum as well as anti-oligosaccharide mAbs. Expression of vacJ and the yrb genes was positively correlated with serum resistance among clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that NTHi adapts to inflammation encountered during infection of the LRT by modulation of its outer leaflet through increased expression of vacJ and yrb genes to minimize recognition by bactericidal anti-oligosaccharide antibodies.
PubMedId: 21253576
Journal-article: PLoS pathogens, vol. 7, 2010
Authors: Himanshu Desai, Karen Eschberger, Aarti Agrawal, Brydon Grant, Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi
Proceedings-article: B36. CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE NON-PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENTS AND QUALITY OF LIFE, 2010
Authors: Aarti Agrawal, Charmaine Kirkham, Aimee L. Brauer, Timothy F. Murphy
Proceedings-article: B103. CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: INSIGHTS INTO THE PATHOBIOLOGY, 2010
Authors: Himanshu Desai, Catherine Wrona, Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi
Proceedings-article: B38. CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATHOGENESIS II, 2010
Authors: Muneki Hotomi, Masamitsu Kono, Akihisa Togawa, Jun Arai, Shin Takei, Yorihiko Ikeda, Masashi Ogami, Timothy F Murphy, Noboru Yamanaka
Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical implication of Haemophilus haemolyticus, one of the closest relative of Haemophilus influenzae, on acute pharyngotonsillitis. We applied polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and IgA protease gene (iga) to distinguish H. haemolyticus and H. influenzae. Among the 199 Haemophilus spp. isolated from 214 patients with acute pharyngotonsillitis, 52 (24.3%) H. influenzae strains and 23 (10.7%) H. haemolyticus strains were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for 16S rDNA and IgA protease gene (iga). All H. haemolyticus strains showed hemolysis on horse blood agar and there were no other Haemophilus spp., nonhemolytic H. haemolyticus and H. influenzae variant strains that had absent iga gene. H. hemolyticus showed close genetic relationship with H. influenzae evaluated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The cases of acute pharyngotonsillitis showing WBC=7000/mm(3) or CRP=8 mg/dl were frequently found among cases with H. influenzae rather than cases with H. haemolyticus. H. haemolyticus is a pharyngeal commensal that is isolated frequently from adults with acute pharyngotonsillitis.
PubMedId: 20392581
Journal-article: Auris, nasus, larynx, vol. 37, 2009
Authors: Elizabeth A Ruckdeschel, Aimee L Brauer, Antoinette Johnson, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is a respiratory tract pathogen causing otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study examined two newly identified proteins as potential vaccine antigens. Antisera raised to recombinant purified proteins Msp22 and Msp75 recognized corresponding native proteins in multiple strains of M. catarrhalis. Vaccine formulations individually administered subcutaneously and intranasally showed enhanced clearance of M. catarrhalis in a mouse pulmonary clearance model by both routes of administration. Msp22 and Msp75 are antigenically conserved proteins that induce potentially protective immune responses and should be examined further as vaccine antigens for M. catarrhalis.
PubMedId: 19786139
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 27, 2009
Authors: Albert Sabirov, Janet R Casey, Timothy F Murphy, Michael E Pichichero
Abstract: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) causes acute otitis media (AOM) in infants. Breast-feeding protects against AOM and/or nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization; however, the mechanism of protection is incompletely understood. Children with AOM and healthy children were studied according to feeding status: breastfed,breast/formula fed, or formula fed. Cumulative episodes of AOM, ELISA titers of serum IgG antibodies to whole-cell NTHi and vaccine candidate outer membrane protein P6, bactericidal titers of serum and NP colonization by NTHi were assessed. A lower incidence of AOM was found in breast- versus formula-fed children. Levels of specific serum IgG antibody to NTHi and P6 were highest in breast-fed, intermediate in breast/formula fed, and lowest in formula-fed infants. Serum IgG antibody to P6 correlated with bactericidal activity against NTHi. Among children with AOM, the prevalence of NTHi in the NP was lower in breast- versus nonbreast-fed infants. We conclude that breast-feeding shows an association with higher levels of antibodies to NTHi and P6, suggesting that breast-feeding modulates the serum immune response to NTHi and P6. Higher serum IgG might facilitate protection against AOM and NP colonization in breast-fed children.
PubMedId: 19581824
Journal-article: Pediatric research, vol. 66, 2009
Authors: Johanna M Schwingel, Katie J Edwards, Andrew D Cox, Hussein Masoud, James C Richards, Frank St Michael, Carmen D Tekwe, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy, Anthony A Campagnari
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is a causative agent of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This strict human pathogen continues to be a significant cause of disease in this broad spectrum of patients because there is no available vaccine. Although numerous putative vaccine antigens have been described, little is known about the human immune response to M. catarrhalis infection in vivo. Human serum antibodies are directed at a number of surface proteins, and lipooligosaccharides (LOS) and detoxified LOS may be an effective immunogen in mice. In this study, we used a specific LOS-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), containing the three major M. catarrhalis serotypes together with a complete series of truncated LOS mutants, to detect the development of new antibodies to specific regions of the oligosaccharide molecule. We compared serum samples from COPD patients who had recently cleared an M. catarrhalis infection to serum samples collected prior to their infection. Variability in the antibody response to LOS was observed, as some patients developed serotype-specific antibodies, others developed antibodies to the LOS of each serotype, others developed broadly cross-reactive antibodies, and some did not develop new antibodies. These newly developed human antibodies are directed at both side chains and core structures in the LOS molecule. This LOS-based ELISA can be used to dissect the human antibody response to both internal and external carbohydrate epitopes, thus providing a better understanding of the humoral immune response to M. catarrhalis LOS epitopes developed during natural infection.
PubMedId: 19651870
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 77, 2009
Authors: Laura A Novotny, Leanne D Adams, D Richard Kang, Gregory J Wiet, Xueya Cai, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy, Lauren O Bakaletz
Abstract: We designed and tested three PilA-derived vaccine candidates in a chinchilla model of ascending nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI)-induced otitis media (OM). Delivery of antiserum directed against each immunogen conferred varying degrees of protection. Presentation of a B-cell epitope derived from the OMP P5 adhesin at the N-terminus of recombinant soluble PilA protein (as opposed to the C-terminus), resulted in a protective chimeric immunogen that combined epitopes from two distinct NTHI adhesins (type IV pili and OMP P5). Incorporating protective epitopes derived from two NTHI adhesins/virulence determinants into a single pediatric vaccine candidate to prevent OM has multiple potential inherent advantages.
PubMedId: 19699813
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 28, 2009
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, G Iyer Parameswaran
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is an exclusively human pathogen and is a common cause of otitis media in infants and children, causing 15%-20% of acute otitis media episodes. M. catarrhalis causes an estimated 2-4 million exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults annually in the United States. M. catarrhalis resembles commensal Neisseria species in culture and, thus, may be overlooked in samples from the human respiratory tract. The prevalence of colonization of the upper respiratory tract is high in infants and children but decreases substantially in adulthood. Most strains produce beta-lactamase and are thus resistant to ampicillin but susceptible to several classes of oral antimicrobial agents. Recent work has elucidated mechanisms of pathogenesis and focused on vaccine development to prevent otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
PubMedId: 19480579
Journal-article: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 49, 2009
Authors: Eric R LaFontaine, Lauren E Snipes, Brian Bullard, Aimee L Brauer, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is a common cause of respiratory tract infection in the setting of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adults with COPD acquire and clear strains of M. catarrhalis from the respiratory tract continuously and develop strain-specific protection following clearance of a strain. In previous work, we identified Hag/MID (Moraxella immunoglobulin D-binding protein), a large multifunctional surface protein that acts as an adhesin and hemagglutinin, as a target of antibody responses in adults with COPD after clearance of M. catarrhalis. The goal of the present study was to characterize the domains of Hag/MID to which humans make antibodies, including both systemic and mucosal antibody responses. Analysis of recombinant peptide constructs, which spanned the M. catarrhalis strain O35E Hag/MID protein, with well-characterized serum and sputum samples revealed that most adults with COPD made antibodies directed toward a region of the molecule bounded by amino acids 706 to 863. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA purified from sputum both recognized the same domain. Some flanking sequence of this fragment was necessary for the epitope(s) in this region to maintain its conformation to bind human antibodies. These results reveal that humans consistently generate both systemic and mucosal antibody responses to an immunodominant region of the Hag/MID molecule, which was previously shown to overlap with several biologically relevant domains, including epithelial cell adherence, IgD binding, collagen binding, and hemagglutination.
PubMedId: 19321697
Journal-article: Clinical and vaccine immunology : CVI, vol. 16, 2009
Authors: Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is isolated in sputum cultures from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but the significance of the organism in this clinical setting is not well known. The purpose of this review is to critically review the literature in an effort to understand the role of P. aeruginosa in the course and pathogenesis of COPD. When examined longitudinally, two distinct patterns of carriage of P. aeruginosa are observed in adults with COPD: short-term colonization followed by clearance and long-term persistence. Acquisition of P. aeruginosa is associated with the occurrence of an exacerbation, indicating that the organism causes exacerbations. Exacerbations caused by P. aeruginosa are more likely to be seen in patients with more advanced COPD, those who have received recent antibiotic therapy and those who require mechanical ventilation for an exacerbation. A subset of adults with COPD becomes chronically colonized with P. aeruginosa, but whether such patients benefit from antimicrobial therapy is not yet known. P. aeruginosa has several different manifestations in the setting of COPD. The organism is a colonizer that is cleared quickly, causes acute exacerbations and also may cause chronic infection in a subset of adults with COPD.
PubMedId: 19532029
Journal-article: Current opinion in pulmonary medicine, vol. 15, 2009
Authors: GI Parameswaran, S Sethi, TF Murphy
Proceedings-article: D30. THE ROLE OF INFLAMMATION IN CHRONIC INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE, 2009
Authors: GI Parameswaran, S Sethi, TF Murphy
Proceedings-article: B50. LUNG HOST DEFENSES TO INFECTION AND HOST CELL PATHOGEN INTERACTION, 2009
Authors: J Jung, MK Thomas, R Sethi, CD Tekwe, TF Murphy, S Sethi
Proceedings-article: A39. COPD EXACERBATIONS, 2009
Authors: S Sethi, N El-Dika, C Wrona, K Eschberger, TF Murphy
Proceedings-article: B37. COPD PATHOGENESIS, 2009
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Current Infectious Disease Reports, vol. 11, pp. 177-182, 2009
Authors: Timothy F Murphy
PubMedId: 19366559
Journal Article: Current infectious disease reports, vol. 11, 2009
Authors: Gordon J. Gaschler, Marko Skrtic, Caleb C. J. Zavitz, Maria Lindahl, Per-Ola Onnervik, Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi, Martin R. St??mpfli
Abstract: The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with acute episodes of bacterial exacerbations. The most commonly isolated bacteria during episodes of exacerbation is nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). In this study, we investigated the in vivo consequences of cigarette smoke exposure on the inflammatory response to an NTHI challenge. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 8 weeks and subsequently challenged intranasally with NTHI. We observed increased pulmonary inflammation and lung damage in cigarette smoke-exposed NTHI-challenged mice as compared with control NTHI-challenged mice. Furthermore, although NTHI challenge in control mice was marked by increases in tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-6, MIP-2, and KC/GROalpha, NTHI challenge in cigarette smoke-exposed mice led to a prominent up-regulation of a different subset of inflammatory mediators, most notably MCP-1, -3, and -5, IP-10, and MIP-1gamma. This skewed inflammatory mediator expression was also observed after ex vivo NTHI stimulation of alveolar macrophages, signifying their importance to this altered response. Importantly, corticosteroids attenuated inflammation after NTHI challenge in both cigarette smoke-exposed and control mice; however, this was associated with significantly increased bacterial burden. Collectively, these data suggest that cigarette smoke exacerbates the inflammatory response to a bacterial challenge via skewed inflammatory mediator expression.
PubMedId: 19179487
Journal-article: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 179, pp. 666-675, 2009
Authors: G Iyer Parameswaran, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is especially prevalent in the elderly, affecting 25% of those aged>or=75 years. The course of the disease in the elderly is often complicated by co-morbid conditions, and its management is complicated by drug-drug interactions. Exacerbations of COPD increase rates of hospitalization and mortality and decrease quality of life. Exacerbations are marked by an increase from baseline in dyspnoea, sputum volume and sputum purulence. Approximately 50% of acute exacerbations of symptoms in COPD are caused by non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Stratification of exacerbations based on severity of symptoms and signs, and severity of underlying COPD, is useful in selecting patients likely to benefit from antibacterial therapy. Patients who are hospitalized with exacerbations, those who have all three symptoms (increased dyspnoea, sputum volume and sputum purulence), and those with severe underlying COPD and exacerbations benefit most from antibacterials. Antibacterial susceptibility patterns among the bacterial pathogens are evolving, and knowledge of local susceptibility patterns is useful in antibacterial selection. Penicillin, amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) and doxycycline should not be used as an initial antibacterial because of resistance patterns. We recommend second-/third-generation cephalosporins, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, azithromycin and respiratory fluoroquinolones as initial choices. In patients at risk of colonization by, and infection as a result of, P. aeruginosa, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin or an advanced penicillin/penicillinase combination effective against this species should be used. Drug-drug interactions should be considered in antibacterial choice. The goals of antibacterial therapy for exacerbations of COPD are the prevention of complications such as respiratory failure and death, and the reduction of treatment failures. The role of pathogenic bacteria in progression of stable COPD and the use of prophylactic antibacterials in stable COPD are under investigation. Currently available evidence does not support routine clinical use of prophylactic antibacterials in stable COPD. In conclusion, pathogenic bacteria cause a significant proportion of acute exacerbations of COPD. Use of antibacterials, based on current susceptibility patterns, is beneficial in patients with severe COPD experiencing exacerbations and in patients with severe exacerbations.
PubMedId: 19929027
Journal-article: Drugs & aging, vol. 26, 2009
Authors: Elza Rakhimova, Lutz Wiehlmann, Aimee??L. Brauer, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy??F. Murphy, Burkhard T??mmler
Abstract: The role played by airway infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the course and pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has not yet been resolved. We report on the molecular epidemiology and population biology of P. aeruginosa in COPD. P. aeruginosa isolates collected from adults with COPD during a 10-year prospective study were genotyped in 56 binary marker loci of core and accessory genomes. The typing of 134 P. aeruginosa COPD isolates uncovered 60 unrelated bacterial clones. The worldwide dominant clones in the P. aeruginosa population were also the most abundant clones among the COPD isolates. Sporadic or intermittent infection with P. aeruginosa was typical for the airways of patients with COPD. Sequential isolates with the same genotype of the core genome diversified the composition of their accessory genome during the course of the infection. Intraclonal microevolution and the frequent turnover or loss of clones are typical for infections with P. aeruginosa in COPD. This epidemiological signature differs from that of the chronic carriage of the same P. aeruginosa clone in patients with cystic fibrosis.
PubMedId: 19919307
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 200, pp. 1928-1935, 2009
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Howard Faden, Lauren O Bakaletz, Jennelle M Kyd, Arne Forsgren, Jose Campos, Mumtaz Virji, Stephen I Pelton
Abstract: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a significant pathogen in children, causing otitis media, sinusitis, conjunctivitis, pneumonia, and occasionally invasive infections. H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccines have no effect on infections caused by nontypeable strains because nontypeable strains are nonencapsulated. Approximately, one-third of episodes of otitis media are caused by nontypeable H. influenzae and the bacterium is the most common cause of recurrent otitis media. Recent progress in elucidating molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, understanding the role of biofilms in otitis media and an increasing understanding of immune responses have potential for development of novel strategies to improve prevention and treatment of otitis media caused by nontypeable H. influenzae. Feasibility of vaccination for prevention of otitis media due to nontypeable H. influenzae was recently demonstrated in a clinical trial with a vaccine that included the surface virulence factor, protein D.
PubMedId: 19057458
Journal-article: The Pediatric infectious disease journal, vol. 28, 2008
Authors: Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has a broad range of clinical manifestations, from apparently self-limited illness to severe disease. This observation raises the question of whether to perform placebo-controlled trials involving patients with mild CAP to determine quantitatively the treatment effect of antibiotic therapy for CAP. A critical analysis of the literature reveals that most clinical trials underestimate the proportion of CAP cases of all severities that are caused by typical bacteria, particularly pneumococci. Studies that use vigorous diagnostic methods consistently report that the majority of CAP cases are caused by pneumococci. Currently, there is little evidence that viruses cause a substantial proportion of CAP cases in adults. Although relevant placebo-controlled trials have not been published in recent years, other evidence indicates that antibiotic therapy is unequivocally effective for pneumococcal pneumonia. The availability of effective therapy for Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia presents clinical, ethical, and pragmatic obstacles to the performance of placebo-controlled trials. Furthermore, if placebo-controlled trials were performed for mild CAP, patients with risk factors for pneumococcal pneumonia and patients with predictors of systemic illness would be excluded, thereby resulting in a highly selected population. On the basis of the data reviewed, there is no justification for placebo-controlled trials involving patients with CAP of any degree of severity.
PubMedId: 18986281
Journal-article: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 47 Suppl 3, 2008
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy
PubMedId: 19038881
Journal-article: The New England journal of medicine, vol. 359, 2008
Authors: Deborah M Cholon, David Cutter, Stephen K Richardson, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy, Dwight C Look, Joseph W St Geme
Abstract: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the lower respiratory tract is commonly colonized by bacterial pathogens, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. The H. influenzae HMW1 and HMW2 adhesins are homologous proteins that promote bacterial adherence to respiratory epithelium and are the predominant targets of the host immune response. These adhesins undergo graded phase variation, controlled by the numbers of 7-bp repeats upstream of the HMW1 and HMW2 structural genes (hmw1A and hmw2A, respectively). In this study, we examined the levels of HMW1 and HMW2 expressed by H. influenzae isolates collected serially from patients with COPD. We found that expression of HMW1 and HMW2 in a given strain decreased over time in a majority of patients, reflecting progressive increases in the numbers of 7-bp repeats and associated with high serum titers of HMW1/HMW2-specific antibodies. We speculate that the presence of high titers of antibodies against the HMW1 and HMW2 adhesins and other immune factors in the lower respiratory tracts of patients with COPD may result in gradual selection for bacteria with reduced levels of HMW1 and HMW2.
PubMedId: 18678658
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 76, 2008
Authors: E. A. Ruckdeschel, C. Kirkham, A. J. Lesse, Z. Hu, T. F. Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults and otitis media in children. Developing an effective vaccine would reduce the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with such infections. An unfinished genome sequence of a strain of M. catarrhalis available in the GenBank database was analyzed, and open reading frames predicted to encode potential vaccine candidates were identified. Three genes encoding proteins having molecular masses of approximately 22, 75, and 78 kDa (designated Msp [Moraxella surface proteins]) (msp22, msp75, and msp78, respectively) were determined to be conserved by competitive hybridization using a microarray, PCR, and sequencing of the genes in clinical isolates of M. catarrhalis. The genes were transcribed when M. catarrhalis was grown in vitro. These genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into Escherichia coli expression vectors. Recombinant proteins were generated and then studied using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with preacquisition and postclearance serum and sputum samples from 31 adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who acquired and cleared M. catarrhalis. New antibody responses to the three proteins were observed for a small proportion of the patients with COPD, indicating that these proteins were expressed during human infection. These studies indicate that the Msp22, Msp75, and Msp78 proteins, whose genes were discovered using genome mining, are highly conserved among strains, are expressed during human infection with M. catarrhalis, and represent potential vaccine antigens.
PubMedId: 18227159
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 76, pp. 1599-1607, 2008
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Aimee L Brauer, Karen Eschberger, Phyllis Lobbins, Lori Grove, Xueya Cai, Sanjay Sethi
Abstract: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is isolated from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in cross-sectional studies. However, patterns of carriage and the role of P. aeruginosa in COPD are unknown. To elucidate carriage patterns, phenotypes of strains, clinical manifestations, and the antibody response to P. aeruginosa in COPD. A prospective study of adults with COPD was conducted. Isolates of P. aeruginosa were subjected to genotypic and phenotypic analysis. Sputum samples were studied for P. aeruginosa DNA, and immune responses were assayed. We analyzed longitudinal clinical data, sputum cultures, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of bacterial DNA, polymerase chain reaction of sputum, and immunoblot assays of serum. Fifty-seven episodes of acquisition of strains of P. aeruginosa were observed in 39 of 126 patients over 10 years. Acquisition of a new strain was associated with exacerbation. Thirty-one episodes of carriage were followed by clearance of the strain; 16 were of short (<1 mo) duration. Thirteen strains demonstrated persistence, and 13 strains were of indeterminate duration. Six strains were mucoid and were more likely to persist than nonmucoid strains (P = 0.005). Antibody responses developed in 53.8% of persistent carriage and in only 9.7% of short-term carriage episodes (P = 0.003). Antibiotics did not account for clearance. Two distinct patterns of carriage by P. aeruginosa were observed: (1) short-term colonization followed by clearance and (2) long-term persistence. Mucoid strains showed persistence. Acquisition of P. aeruginosa is associated with the occurrence of an exacerbation. Serum antibody responses do not mediate clearance of P. aeruginosa.
PubMedId: 18202344
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 177, 2008
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 177, pp. 1049-1049, 2008
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Catherine Wrona, Karen Eschberger, Phyllis Lobbins, Xueya Cai, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Whether the airway and systemic inflammatory profile in bacterial exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is distinct from nonbacterial exacerbations is unclear. Previous studies have not used molecular typing of bacterial pathogens, which is required to accurately define bacterial infection in COPD. The relationship between clinical severity and course of exacerbation and inflammation is also not fully understood. To determine if (1) systemic and airway inflammation is distinct in new bacterial strain exacerbations and (2) clinical severity and resolution of exacerbations is related to airway and systemic inflammation. In a prospective longitudinal cohort study in COPD, sputum and serum samples obtained before, at, and following exacerbations during a 2-year period were studied. Clinical information, molecular typing of bacterial pathogens, sputum IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and neutrophil elastase, and serum C-reactive protein. From 46 patients, 177 exacerbations were grouped as new strain, preexisting strain, other pathogen, and pathogen negative. New strain exacerbations were associated with significantly greater increases from baseline in sputum TNF-alpha and neutrophil elastase, and in serum C-reactive protein compared with the other three groups. Increases in inflammatory markers were similar among the other three groups. Clinical resolution was accompanied by resolution of inflammation to preexacerbation levels, whereas persistent symptoms were paralleled by persistently elevated inflammation. Clinical exacerbation severity was significantly correlated with levels of all four markers. Neutrophilic airway inflammation and systemic inflammation are more intense with well-defined bacterial exacerbations than with nonbacterial exacerbations. Clinical course of exacerbation and inflammation are closely linked.
PubMedId: 18079493
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 177, 2007
Authors: G Iyer Parameswaran, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Chronic lung diseases are prevalent worldwide and cause significant mortality and suffering. This article discusses infections that occur in three chronic lung diseases: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis. Rather than discussing the role of infections as etiology of these diseases, this article focuses on infections that occur in the background of established chronic lung disease.
PubMedId: 17826618
Journal-article: Infectious disease clinics of North America, vol. 21, 2007
Authors: Timothy??F. Murphy, Aimee??L. Brauer, Sanjay Sethi, Mogens Kilian, Xueya Cai, Alan??J. Lesse
Abstract: Haemophilus influenzae is a common pathogen in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a prospective study, selected isolates of apparent H. influenzae had an altered phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that these variant strains were genetically different from typical H. influenzae. A prospective study of adults with COPD was conducted. Strains of apparent H. influenzae obtained from a range of clinical sources were evaluated by ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, multilocus sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization, and sequencing of the conserved P6 gene. Variant strains were determined to be Haemophilus haemolyticus by means of 4 independent methods. Analysis of 490 apparent H. influenzae strains, identified by standard methods, revealed that 39.5% of sputum isolates and 27.3% of nasopharyngeal isolates were H. haemolyticus. Isolates obtained from normally sterile sites were all H. influenzae. In a prospective study, acquisitions of new strains of H. haemolyticus were not associated with exacerbations of COPD, whereas 45% of acquisitions of new strains of H. influenzae were associated with exacerbations. Standard methods do not reliably distinguish H. haemolyticus from H. influenzae. H. haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal. The recognition that some strains of apparent H. influenzae are H. haemolyticus substantially strengthens the association of true H. influenzae with clinical infection.
PubMedId: 17152011
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 195, pp. 81-89, 2007
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Rohin Sethi, Karen Eschberger, Phyllis Lobbins, Xueya Cai, Brydon J B Grant, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Increased bacterial concentration (load) in the lower airways and new bacterial strain acquisition have been posited as mechanisms for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. Bacterial concentrations are higher during exacerbation than during stable disease; however, these studies are cross sectional and devoid of strain typing. To determine if the increased bacterial concentrations function as a separate mechanism for exacerbation induction independent of new strain acquisition. In a prospective, longitudinal cohort of patients with COPD, the relationship between exacerbation occurrence, sputum bacterial concentrations, and new strain acquisition was examined. Clinical information, quantitative sputum cultures, and molecular typing of potential bacterial pathogen isolates. Over 81 months, 104 subjects completed 3,009 clinic visits, 560 (19.6%) during exacerbations and 2,449 (80.4%) during stable disease. Among preexisting strains, sputum concentrations of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus were not different in exacerbation versus stable disease. Moraxella catarrhalis (stable, 10(8.38 +/- 0.13) [mean +/- SEM] vs. exacerbation, 10(7.78 +/- 0.26); p = 0.02) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (stable, 10(8.42 +/- 0.21) vs. exacerbation, 10(7.76 +/- 0.52); p = 0.07) concentrations were lower during exacerbations compared with stable periods. Concentrations of new strains of H. influenzae (stable, 10(7.28 +/- 0.15) vs. exacerbation, 10(7.76 +/- 0.17); p = 0.04) and M. catarrhalis (stable, 10(7.85 +/- 0.15) vs. exacerbation, 10(8.37 +/- 0.14); p = 0.02), were increased during exacerbations; however, the differences were small. Change in bacterial load is unlikely to be an important mechanism for exacerbations. Better understanding of the host-pathogen interaction, rather than enumerating bacteria in respiratory samples, is required to provide new insights into bacterial infection in COPD.
PubMedId: 17478618
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 176, 2007
Authors: M. M. Fernaays, A. J. Lesse, X. Cai, T. F. Murphy
Abstract: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important respiratory pathogen, causing otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infection in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease is a well-described protein and potential virulence factor in this organism as well as other respiratory pathogens. IgA1 proteases cleave human IgA1, are involved in invasion, and display immunomodulatory effects. We have identified a second IgA1 protease gene, igaB, in H. influenzae that is present in addition to the previously described IgA1 protease gene, iga. Reverse transcriptase PCR and IgA1 protease assays indicated that the gene is transcribed, expressed, and enzymatically active in H. influenzae. The product of this gene is a type 2 IgA1 protease with homology to the iga gene of Neisseria species. Mutants that were deficient in iga, igaB, and both genes were constructed in H. influenzae strain 11P6H, a strain isolated from a patient with COPD who was experiencing an exacerbation. Analysis of these mutants indicated that igaB is the primary mediator of IgA1 protease activity in this strain. IgA1 protease activity assays on 20 clinical isolates indicated that the igaB gene is associated with increased levels of IgA1 protease activity. Approximately one-third of 297 strains of H. influenzae of diverse clinical and geographic origin contained igaB. Significant differences in the prevalence of igaB were observed among isolates from different sites of isolation (sputum > middle ear > nasopharynx). These data support the hypothesis that the newly discovered igaB gene is a potential virulence factor in nontypeable H. influenzae.
PubMedId: 16988265
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 74, pp. 5860-5870, 2006
Authors: T. F. Murphy, C. Kirkham, A. J. Lesse
Abstract: Outer membrane protein P6 is the subject of investigation as a vaccine antigen to prevent infections caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, which causes otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic lung disease. P6 induces protective immune responses in animal models and is the target of potentially protective immune responses in humans. P6 is a 16-kDa lipoprotein that shares homology with the peptidoglycan-associated lipoproteins of gram-negative bacteria and is highly conserved among strains of H. influenzae. To characterize the function of P6, an isogenic mutant was constructed by replacing the P6 gene with a chloramphenicol resistance cassette. The P6 mutant showed altered colony morphology and slower growth in vitro than that of the parent strain. By electron microscopy, the P6 mutant cells demonstrated increased size, variability in size, vesicle formation, and fragility compared to the parent cells. The P6 mutant showed hypersensitivity to selected antibiotics with different mechanisms of action, indicating increased accessibility of the agents to their targets. The P6 mutant was more sensitive to complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. Complementation of the mutation in trans completely or partially restored the phenotypes. We concluded that P6 plays a structural role in maintaining the integrity of the outer membrane by anchoring the outer membrane to the cell wall. The observation that the absence of expression of P6 is detrimental to the cell is a highly desirable feature for a vaccine antigen, supporting further investigation of P6 as a vaccine candidate for H. influenzae.
PubMedId: 16926409
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 74, pp. 5169-5176, 2006
Authors: M. M. Fernaays, A. J. Lesse, S. Sethi, X. Cai, T. F. Murphy
Abstract: Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory infection in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients with COPD experience periodic exacerbations that are associated with acquisition of new bacterial strains. However, not every strain acquisition is associated with exacerbation. To test the hypothesis that genetic differences among strains account for differences in pathogenic potential, a microarray consisting of 4,992 random 1.5- to 3-kb genomic fragments of an exacerbation strain was constructed. Competitive hybridization was performed using six strains associated with exacerbation as well as five strains associated with asymptomatic colonization. Seven sequences that were absent in all five colonization strains and present in at least two exacerbation strains were identified. One such sequence was a previously unreported gene with high homology to the meningococcal immunoglobulin A (IgA) protease gene, which is distinct from the previously described H. influenzae IgA protease. To assess the distribution of the seven sequences among well-characterized strains of H. influenzae, 59 exacerbation strains and 73 asymptomatic colonization strains were screened by PCR for the presence of these sequences. The presence or absence of any single sequence was not significantly associated with exacerbations of COPD. However, logistic regression and subgroup analysis identified combinations of the presence and absence of genes that are associated with exacerbations. These results indicate that patterns of genes are associated with the ability of strains of H. influenzae to cause exacerbations of COPD, supporting the concept that differences in pathogenic potential are based in part on genomic differences among infecting strains, not merely host factors.
PubMedId: 16714566
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 74, pp. 3366-3374, 2006
Authors: Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Bacteria cause approximately half of all chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the status of research on the role of bacteria in airway inflammation during exacerbations and the mechanisms by which bacterial antigens induce inflammation. Bacteria in the airways of adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease release antigens including endotoxin, peptidoglycan fragments, lipoproteins, and other molecules into the airways. These bacterial antigens induce potent inflammatory effects in the airways. Bacterial exacerbations are associated with systemic inflammation. Studies of Haemophilus influenzae, the most common bacterial cause of exacerbations, reveal that strains associated with exacerbations induce more inflammation compared to colonizing strains. H. influenzae antigens induce production of interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, activate Toll-like 2 receptors, activate NFkappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein signaling pathways, and have other inflammatory effects. Research on the role of bacteria in causing inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been neglected for decades. Research should be directed at further evaluating the role of bacterial antigens in airway inflammation. Reducing or modulating bacterial infection of the airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has the potential to reduce airway inflammation by eliminating an important inciting cause.
PubMedId: 16645482
Journal-article: Current opinion in infectious diseases, vol. 19, 2006
Authors: John M Neary, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: The P2 porin is the most abundant protein in the outer membrane of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Analysis of P2 sequences from a limited number of strains reveals the presence of both heterogeneous and conserved surface-exposed loops of the P2 molecule among strains. We have previously shown that antibodies raised against the loop 6 sequence of P2 from strain 5657 are bactericidal against multiple isolates. In this study, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the loop 6 region of the P2 molecule from 108 strains of nontypeable H. influenzae in order to assess more rigorously the degree of conservation of loop 6. Based on this analysis, we identified a conserved sequence, different from that of strain 5657, that occurs in approximately one-third of the strains sequenced. To assess the potential of this peptide as a vaccine antigen, antibodies raised to a multiple antigenic peptide corresponding to this sequence were characterized with respect to specificity for the P2 molecule and reactivity with heterologous strains in immunoblot assay, flow cytometry and bactericidal assays. Antibodies were reactive to the P2 molecule of 16 of 20 strains tested by immunoblot assay. Antibodies recognized nine of the 20 strains in a flow cytometry assay, and 13 of 20 demonstrated complement-mediated killing in bactericidal assays. These results support the concept of using conserved regions of the P2 protein as a vaccine antigen.
PubMedId: 16487307
Journal-article: FEMS immunology and medical microbiology, vol. 46, 2006
Authors: W W Mary Fung, Cl?ona A O'Dwyer, Sunita Sinha, Aimee L Brauer, Timothy F Murphy, J Simon Kroll, Paul R Langford
PubMedId: 16988021
Journal Article: Journal of clinical microbiology, vol. 44, 2006
Authors: Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: An urgent need exists for vaccines to prevent infections caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. These bacteria cause otitis media in children, a clinical problem associated with enormous morbidity and cost. H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis also cause lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic lung disease. Infections in this clinical setting are associated with disability and death. Recent progress in identifying potential vaccine antigens in both bacteria raises great promise in developing effective vaccines. This paper reviews the key issues in vaccine development for H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis, including areas where progress has been stalled, and proposes areas that deserve investigation in the next 5 years.
PubMedId: 16372880
Journal-article: Expert review of vaccines, vol. 4, 2005
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Aimee L Brauer, Brydon J B Grant, Sanjay Sethi
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is frequently present in the sputum of adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Little is known about the role of M. catarrhalis in this common disease. To elucidate the burden of disease, the dynamics of carriage, and immune responses to M. catarrhalis in COPD. Prospective cohort study of 104 adults with COPD in an outpatient clinic at the Buffalo Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Clinical information, sputum cultures, molecular typing of isolates, and immunoassays to measure antibodies to M. catarrhalis. Over 81 months, 104 patients made 3,009 clinic visits, 560 during exacerbations. Molecular typing identified 120 episodes of acquisition and clearance of M. catarrhalis in 50 patients; 57 (47.5%) of the acquisitions were associated with clinical exacerbations. No instances of simultaneous acquisition of a new strain of another pathogen were observed. The duration of carriage of M. catarrhalis was shorter with exacerbations compared with asymptomatic colonization (median, 31.0 vs. 40.4 days; p = 0.01). Reacquisition of the same strain was rare. The intensity of the serum IgG response was greater after exacerbations than asymptomatic colonization (p = 0.009). Asymptomatic colonization was associated with a greater frequency of a sputum IgA response than exacerbation (p = 0.009). M. catarrhalis likely causes approximately 10% of exacerbations of COPD, accounting for approximately 2 to 4 million episodes annually. The organism is cleared efficiently after a short duration of carriage. Patients develop strain-specific protection after clearance of M. catarrhalis from the respiratory tract.
PubMedId: 15805178
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 172, 2005
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy, Charmaine Kirkham, Sanjay Sethi, Alan J. Lesse
Abstract: Evidence is mounting that nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae grows as a biofilm in the middle ear of children with otitis media and the airways of adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To begin to assess antigens expressed by H. influenzae in biofilms, cell envelopes of bacteria grown as a biofilm were compared to those grown planktonically. A approximately 30kDa peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin was present in greater abundance during growth in biofilms. Mutants deficient in expression of peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin were constructed by homologous recombination in four clinical isolates. The mutants showed a 25-50% reduction in biofilm formation compared to the corresponding parent strains. To study in vivo expression of peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin during human respiratory tract infection, paired pre- and post-exacerbation serum from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and H. influenzae in sputum were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and purified recombinant peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin. Eight from 18 (44.4%) paired serum samples showed a significant increase in antibody to peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin from pre- to post-infection. These results indicate that (1) peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin is present in greater abundance in H. influenzae biofilms compared to planktonically grown bacteria; (2) peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin is involved in biofilm formation by H. influenzae and the degree of involvement varies among strains; and (3) peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin is expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human respiratory tract and is recognized by the human immune system.
PubMedId: 15780580
Journal-article: FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology, vol. 44, pp. 81-89, 2005
Authors: G Scott Giebink, Yuichi Kurono, Lauren O Bakaletz, Jennelle M Kyd, Stephen J Barenkamp, Timothy F Murphy, Bruce Green, Pearay L Ogra, Xin-Xing Gu, Janak A Patel, Terho Heikkinen, Stephen I Pelton, Muneki Hotomi, Pekka Karma
PubMedId: 15700938
Journal Article: The Annals of otology, rhinology & laryngology. Supplement, vol. 194, 2005
Authors: Stephen J Barenkamp, Yuichi Kurono, Pearay L Ogra, Alberto Leiberman, Lauren O Bakaletz, Timothy F Murphy, Tasnee Chonmaitree, Janak A Patel, Terho Heikkinen, Tania Maria Sih, David S Hurst, Joseph W St Geme, Hideyuki Kawauchi, Lars-Eric Stenfors
PubMedId: 15700937
Journal Article: The Annals of otology, rhinology & laryngology. Supplement, vol. 194, 2005
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi
PubMedId: 15640372
Journal-article: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 171, pp. 194-195, 2005
Authors: Cecilia L. Chin, Lori J. Manzel, Erin E. Lehman, Alicia L. Humlicek, Lei Shi, Timothy D. Starner, Gerene M. Denning, Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi, Dwight C. Look
Abstract: Airway infection with Haemophilus influenzae causes airway inflammation, and isolation of new strains of this bacteria is associated with increased risk of exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To determine whether strains of H. influenzae associated with exacerbations cause more inflammation than strains that colonize the airways of patients with COPD. Exacerbation strains of H. influenzae were isolated from patients during exacerbation of clinical symptoms with subsequent development of a homologous serum antibody response and were compared with colonization strains that were not associated with symptom worsening or an antibody response. Bacterial strains were compared using an in vivo mouse model of airway infection and in vitro cell culture model of bacterial adherence and defense gene and signaling pathway activation in primary human airway epithelial cells. H. influenzae associated with exacerbations caused more airway neutrophil recruitment compared with colonization strains in the mouse model of airway bacterial infection. Furthermore, exacerbation strains adhered to epithelial cells in significantly higher numbers and induced more interleukin-8 release after interaction with airway epithelial cells. This effect was likely mediated by increased activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. The results indicate that H. influenzae strains isolated from patients during COPD exacerbations often induce more airway inflammation and likely have differences in virulence compared with colonizing strains. These findings support the concept that bacteria infecting the airway during COPD exacerbations mediate increased airway inflammation and contribute to decreased airway function.
PubMedId: 15805181
Journal-article: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 172, pp. 85-91, 2005
Authors: Tinghuai Wu, Jing Chen, Timothy F Murphy, Bruce A Green, Xin-Xing Gu
Abstract: Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) outer membrane protein P6 was used as a new protein carrier for NTHi detoxified lipooligosaccharide (dLOS) conjugates due to its conservation and potential to elicit bactericidal antibodies. P6 was covalently conjugated to dLOS of strain 9274 through adipic acid dihydrazide with different ratios of dLOS to P6, which resulted in two conjugate formulations with weight ratios of dLOS to P6 of 3.7 for dLOS-P6 (I) and 1.6 for dLOS-P6 (II). Binding activity of the conjugates was examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with mouse monoclonal antibodies specific to LOS and P6 and a rabbit anti-P6 serum. The results showed that the conjugates bound not only to the LOS antibody but also to both P6 antibodies, suggesting that the conjugates retained epitopes of both LOS and P6 antigens. Animal studies revealed that dLOS-P6 (II) induced high levels of anti-LOS and anti-P6 IgGs in mice and rabbits. However, dLOS-P6 (I) induced lower levels of anti-LOS IgGs in mice and rabbits and anti-P6 IgGs in rabbits with no anti-P6 IgGs in mice. In addition, all rabbit, but not mouse, antisera elicited by the conjugates showed bactericidal activity against the homologous strain, and two of them elicited by each conjugate plus Ribi adjuvant showed cross-bactericidal activity against three of five major serotype stains. These data indicate that P6 could serve as an effective carrier for dLOS or other carbohydrate conjugates and that the ratio of carbohydrate to P6 might contribute to immune responses in vivo.
PubMedId: 16039021
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 23, 2004
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Lauren O Bakaletz, Jennelle M Kyd, Bracie Watson, David L Klein
Abstract: Otitis media is a common problem with enormous morbidity worldwide. The development of vaccines to prevent otitis media would have an important human and economic impact. A striking lack of progress in the development, production and clinical testing of vaccines to prevent otitis media has occurred in the past decade. This review outlines a series of specific proposals intended to advance vaccine development for otitis media.
PubMedId: 15780715
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 23, 2004
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Exacerbations are a characteristic feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and contribute significantly to associated morbidity and mortality. Renewed interest in this common clinical problem and research using new investigative tools has enhanced substantially the understanding of the pathogenesis of exacerbations. Results of recent clinical trials and observational studies have allowed refinements in treatment of exacerbations that should im-prove patient outcomes. This article discusses a rational, stratified approach to the use of antibiotics for this condition based on these recent studies.
PubMedId: 15555829
Journal-article: Infectious disease clinics of North America, vol. 18, 2004
Authors: Ran Chen, Jae Hyang Lim, Hirofumi Jono, Xin-Xing Gu, Young S Kim, Carol B Basbaum, Timothy F Murphy, Jian-Dong Li
Abstract: Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) infections. The molecular mechanisms underlying up-regulation of mucin in NTHi infections especially during the initial phase remain unknown. Here we show that P6, a 16-kDa outer membrane lipoprotein well conserved in NTHi, up-regulates MUC5AC mucin gene transcription in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, P6 induces MUC5AC transcription via TLR2-MyD88-IRAK1-TRAF6-TAK1-dependent p38 MAPK-AP1 and IKKbeta-IkappaBalpha-NF-kappaB signaling pathways. This study may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of NTHi-induced infections and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for inhibiting mucin overproduction in patients with NTHi infections.
PubMedId: 15485666
Journal-article: Biochemical and biophysical research communications, vol. 324, 2004
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Aimee L Brauer, Andrew T Schiffmacher, Sanjay Sethi
Abstract: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae colonizes the respiratory tract of adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and causes intermittent exacerbations. Isolates of H. influenzae collected monthly in a prospective study were subjected to molecular typing. During a 7-year study spanning 345 patient-months of observation, 122 episodes of negative cultures lasting 1 month or more, and that were preceded and followed by isolation of an apparently identical strain of H. influenzae, were found. Seventeen such episodes of negative cultures, lasting 6 months or more and spanning 203 patient-months, were studied in detail to test the hypothesis that these periods of negative cultures represented continuous colonization by the same strain of H. influenzae. Molecular typing by three independent methods established that the strains preceding and following the episodes of negative cultures were indeed identical. Strain-specific H. influenzae DNA was detected in some of the sputum samples that had yielded negative cultures. These results indicate that some patients with COPD are persistently colonized with H. influenzae and that sputum cultures underestimate the frequency of colonization of the respiratory tract by H. influenzae in COPD. This observation has a significant impact on understanding bacterial colonization in COPD.
PubMedId: 15117742
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 170, 2004
Authors: Diana G Adlowitz, Thomas Hiltke, Alan J Lesse, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella catarrhalis is an important cause of otitis media, sinusitis, and lower respiratory tract infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The purified outer membrane of M. catarrhalis contains a 29 kDa band, previously named outer membrane protein G1 (OMP G1). Polyclonal antiserum to the OMP G1 band was used to screen a genomic lambda phage library and the gene for OMP G1a was cloned and sequenced. Analysis of outer membrane by isoelectric focusing and amino-terminal protein sequence of the 29 kDa band revealed that the band is actually two individual proteins designated OMP G1a and OMP G1b. OMP G1a is a lipoprotein with an isoelectric point of 4. OMP G1b contains an unblocked amino-terminus and has an isoelectric point of 9. Analysis of the sequence of OMP G1a and OMP G1b from 25 clinical isolates revealed a high degree of conservation among strains. The sequence conservation of OMP G1a and OMP G1b among strains, combined with previous observations that OMP G1a and OMP G1b contain epitopes on the bacterial surface, indicate that OMP G1a and OMP G1b are potential vaccine antigens for M. catarrhalis.
PubMedId: 15193378
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 22, pp. 2533-2540, 2004
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Catherine Wrona, Brydon J B Grant, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Previous studies of immune response to Haemophilus influenzae after exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have yielded contradictory results. Using homologous (infecting) strains and immunoassays to surface-exposed epitopes, we tested the hypothesis that adults with COPD make new antibodies to strain-specific, surface-exposed epitopes on H. influenzae after exacerbations. We collected clinical information, sputum, and serum monthly and during exacerbations from 81 patients with COPD over 56 months. Serum antibodies to H. influenzae after exacerbations associated with H. influenzae in sputum were detected with whole bacterial cell ELISA and bactericidal assays. An immune response to homologous H. influenzae occurred after 22 of 36 (61.1%) exacerbations with newly acquired strains compared with 7 of 33 (21.2%) exacerbations with preexisting strains (odds ratio [OR] = 4.4; 95%, 1.8 to 10.8; p = 0.001). An absence of an immune response was strongly associated with complement sensitivity (OR = 0.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.003 to 0.22; p = 0.001). New bactericidal antibodies developed after exacerbations were highly strain specific, showing bactericidal activity for only 11 of 90 (12.2%) heterologous strains. Development of an immune response to H. influenzae supports its role in causing exacerbations. The strain specificity of the immune response likely represents a mechanism of recurrent exacerbations.
PubMedId: 14597486
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 169, 2003
Authors: Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: This review will consider recent developments in the clinical aspects of infections due to non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. In addition, newer developments in the areas of mechanisms of pathogenesis, host pathogen interaction, immune responses and efforts toward vaccine development will be reviewed briefly. Non-typeable H. influenzae continues to be a common cause of otitis media in infants and children, sinusitis in children and adults, pneumonia in adults, and lower respiratory tract infection in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While the rate of beta-lactamase production by isolates of H. influenzae varies geographically, most regions show a rate of 20-35% of isolates producing beta-lactamase. Recent studies have highlighted the possible role of bacterial biofilms formed by H. influenzae as a cause of otitis media. Several lines of evidence indicate that H. influenzae causes intracellular infection in the lower respiratory tract in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and this observation has important implications in understanding the human immune response to the bacterium. Lipooligosaccharide is an important virulence factor for H. influenzae and research is generating new information on the complex role of this molecule in colonization and infection of the respiratory tract. Several surface molecules are under active evaluation as vaccine antigens. Non-typeable H. influenzae is an important cause of respiratory tract infections in children and adults. Most strains are susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate, fluoroquinolones and the newer macrolides. Research in the next decade promises substantial progress in the challenge of developing vaccines for nontypeable H. influenzae.
PubMedId: 12734445
Journal-article: Current opinion in infectious diseases, vol. 16, 2003
Authors: Venkata Bandi, Marta Jakubowycz, Carla Kinyon, Edward O Mason, Robert L Atmar, Stephen B Greenberg, Timothy F Murphy
Journal-article: FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology, vol. 37, pp. 69-75, 2003
Authors: Venkata Bandi, Marta Jakubowycz, Carla Kinyon, Edward O Mason, Robert L Atmar, Stephen B Greenberg, Timothy F Murphy
PubMedId: 12770762
Journal Article: FEMS immunology and medical microbiology, vol. 37, 2003
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, vol. 16, pp. 129-134, 2003
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Current Opinion in Internal Medicine, vol. 2, pp. 260-265, 2003
Authors: Thomas??J. Hiltke, Andrew??T. Schiffmacher, Antoinette??J. Dagonese, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy??F. Murphy
Abstract: An adult with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was monitored prospectively for 2 years. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae was isolated from sputum cultures at 22 of 23 monthly clinic visits. Analysis of the isolates, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), revealed that the patient was colonized by 3 different strains during the 2-year period. The gene encoding outer-membrane protein (OMP) P2, ompP2, was amplified from sputum samples and selected strains obtained from this patient. Analysis of the ompP2 sequences, in combination with the PFGE patterns, indicated that ompP2 horizontal transfer between 2 strains occurred in the respiratory tract, between clinic visits 13 and 14. Observation of ompP2 horizontal transfer in the human respiratory tract has important implications for both the understanding of ompP2 diversity among strains and the future design of OMP P2-based vaccines.
PubMedId: 12825179
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 188, pp. 114-117, 2003
Authors: T. F. Murphy, C. Kirkham, D.-F. Liu, S. Sethi
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 71, pp. 1288-1294, 2003
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Charmaine Kirkham
Journal-article: BMC Microbiology, vol. 2, pp. 7, 2002
Authors: Timothy F Murphy, Charmaine Kirkham
PubMedId: 11960553
Journal Article: BMC microbiology, vol. 2, 2002
Authors: Lauren O Bakaletz, Stephen J Barenkamp, Juhani Eskola, Bruce Green, Xin-Xing Gu, Teruhiko Harada, Terho Heikkinen, Pekka Karma, Jerome O Klein, Yuichi Kurono, Goro Mogi, Timothy F Murphy, Pearay L Ogra, Janak A Patel, Masashi Suzuki, Noboru Yamanaka
PubMedId: 11968864
Journal Article: The Annals of otology, rhinology & laryngology. Supplement, vol. 188, 2002
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Nancy Evans, Brydon J.B. Grant, Timothy F. Murphy
Abstract: The role of bacterial pathogens in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is controversial. In older studies, the rates of isolation of bacterial pathogens from sputum were the same during acute exacerbations and during stable disease. However, these studies did not differentiate among strains within a bacterial species and therefore could not detect changes in strains over time. We hypothesized that the acquisition of a new strain of a pathogenic bacterial species is associated with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We conducted a prospective study in which clinical information and sputum samples for culture were collected monthly and during exacerbations from 81 outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Molecular typing of sputum isolates of nonencapsulated Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was performed. Over a period of 56 months, the 81 patients made a total of 1975 clinic visits, 374 of which were made during exacerbations (mean, 2.1 per patient per year). On the basis of molecular typing, an exacerbation was diagnosed at 33.0 percent of the clinic visits that involved isolation of a new strain of a bacterial pathogen, as compared with 15.4 percent of visits at which no new strain was isolated (P<0.001; relative risk of an exacerbation, 2.15; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.83 to 2.53). Isolation of a new strain of H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or S. pneumoniae was associated with a significantly increased risk of an exacerbation. The association between an exacerbation and the isolation of a new strain of a bacterial pathogen supports the causative role of bacteria in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
PubMedId: 12181400
Journal-article: New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 347, pp. 465-471, 2002
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi, Susan L. Hill, Robert A. Stockley
PubMedId: 11779743
Journal-article: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 165, pp. 132-132, 2002
Authors: Yusuke Abe, Timothy F Murphy, Sanjay Sethi, Howard S Faden, Jacek Dmochowski, Yasuaki Harabuchi, Yasmin M Thanavala
Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by periodic exacerbations, some of which are caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). P6 is an outer membrane lipoprotein that is highly conserved among strains of NTHI. We hypothesized that lymphocytes from patients with COPD who have exacerbations due to NTHI have a decreased ability to recognize P6. The in vitro lymphocyte proliferative response to P6 in 36 patients with COPD and 12 healthy control subjects was studied. Ten patients who had exacerbations due to NTHI in the previous 12 months showed statistically significant lower proliferation to P6 (stimulation index, log transformed mean +/- standard error 0.82 +/- 0.17) compared with 26 patients who had no exacerbations due to NTHI in the previous 12 months (1.42 +/- 0.13) and to 12 healthy control subjects (1.61 +/- 0.16). These three groups had no significant difference in the lymphocyte proliferative response to tetanus toxoid. There was no difference in serum antibody levels to P6 in the two groups with COPD. These results indicate that decreased proliferation of T cells to P6 is associated with exacerbations of COPD and suggest that the ability of T cells to recognize P6 is associated with relative protection from exacerbations due to NTHI.
PubMedId: 11934723
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 165, 2002
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi
Journal-article: Drugs & Aging, vol. 19, pp. 761-775, 2002
Authors: Faris Bakri, Aimee L Brauer, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: To characterize the immune response to Moraxella catarrhalis after exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pre- and postexacerbation serum and sputum supernatant samples obtained during 21 exacerbations in 18 patients were studied, using the homologous infecting isolates. New serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) detected by whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay developed after 12 (57.1%) of 21 exacerbations. Analysis of serum samples with flow cytometry, which detects antibodies that are exclusive to epitopes on the bacterial surface, revealed that 5 (23.8%) of the 21 exacerbations were associated with the development of new serum IgG to surface epitopes. Three of these serum samples and 2 other serum samples contained new IgG directed at lipooligosaccharide. Flow cytometry revealed that new mucosal IgA to surface-exposed epitopes of the infecting isolate developed in sputum supernatants after 42% of exacerbations. Therefore, adults with COPD develop variable humoral immune responses to M. catarrhalis after exacerbations, including new serum IgG and new mucosal IgA to epitopes on the bacterial surface.
PubMedId: 11865420
Journal-article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 185, 2001
Authors: Thomas J Hiltke, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F Murphy
Abstract: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Recent findings suggest that the major outer membrane protein P2 should be reconsidered as a vaccine candidate for NTHI. A P2-based vaccine would require a relative degree of sequence stability of the gene encoding P2 (ompP2) during colonization. To characterize the sequence stability of ompP2 during colonization of the human respiratory tract, ompP2 genes from 13 sets of isolates that persisted in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (mean colonization, 7 months) were sequenced. In 9 sets of isolates, ompP2 did not change. Sequence changes were noted in 4 sets of isolates. Most of these changes occurred within areas of repetitive DNA, suggesting that this type of DNA has a role in antigenic variation of P2. The sequence of ompP2 is relatively stable during persistence of NTHI in the human host.
PubMedId: 11865419
Journal-article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 185, 2001
Authors: V Bandi, M A Apicella, E Mason, T F Murphy, A Siddiqi, R L Atmar, S B Greenberg
Abstract: The frequency of colonization and intracellular localization of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) in the lower respiratory tract was determined in healthy adults and in clinically stable and acutely ill chronic bronchitis (CB) patients. NTHi was recovered from bronchial wash or bronchial brush specimens in 6 of 23 (26%) stable CB patients and in 1 of 15 (7%) CB patients with a respiratory exacerbation. No NTHi (0 of 26) was recovered from lower tract specimens of healthy adults undergoing anesthesia for elective surgery. Molecular typing of NTHi strains revealed that five of nine patients with stable CB had different strains in upper respiratory tract and bronchial wash/brush specimens collected simultaneously. Four stable patients with CB had different strains recovered on repeat bronchoscopy. These results demonstrate the frequent colonization of the lower airways of stable CB patients with multiple strains of NTHi. Bronchial biopsies also were examined for intracellular NTHi by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence microscopy. Intracellular NTHi were found in 0 of 7 healthy adults, 8 of 24 patients with clinically stable CB, and 13 of 15 acutely ill CB patients. This observation suggests a role for intracellular infection by NTHi in the pathogenesis of exacerbations of CB.
PubMedId: 11739144
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 164, 2001
Authors: J M Bernstein, D Dryja, T F Murphy
Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that the origin of bacteria that enter the lateral wall of the nose and paranasal sinuses arise from the nasopharynx. The purpose of this study was to compare the molecular biological profiles of potential pathogens found in the nasopharynx and lateral wall of the nose concomittantly in children undergoing surgery for upper respiratory tract disease. Fifty-two children undergoing adenoidectomy for either tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy (hypertrophy) or otitis media with effusion were studied. Bacterial cultures were taken from the crypts of the adenoids and from the lateral wall of the nose under endoscopic control after sterilization of the vestibule and inferior turbinate. Routine cultures of these areas were performed in the bacteriology laboratory of the Children's Hospital of Buffalo. Bacterial pathogens were isolated from 79% of adenoids and 46% of lateral walls of the nose. Molecular typing of pairs of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis revealed that in 16 of 18 pairs (89%) the identical strain was present in both sites simultaneously. These results support the concept that when potential bacterial pathogens that may cause acute bacterial rhinosinusitis are found concomitantly in the nasopharynx and lateral wall of the nose, they are usually identical.
PubMedId: 11743458
Journal-article: Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 125, 2001
Authors: T F Murphy, A L Brauer, N Yuskiw, E R McNamara, C Kirkham
Abstract: Outer membrane protein E (OMP E) is a 50-kDa protein of Moraxella catarrhalis which has several features that suggest that the protein may be an effective vaccine antigen. To assess the conservation of OMP E among strains of M. catarrhalis, 22 isolates were studied with eight monoclonal antibodies which recognize epitopes on different regions of the protein. Eighteen of 22 strains were reactive with all eight antibodies. The sequences of ompE from 16 strains of M. catarrhalis were determined, including the 4 strains which were nonreactive with selected monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of sequences indicate a high degree of conservation among strains, with sequence differences clustered in limited regions of the gene. To assess the stability of ompE during colonization of the human respiratory tract, the sequences of ompE of isolates collected from patients colonized with the same strain for 3 to 9 months were determined. The sequences remained unchanged. These results indicate that OMP E is highly conserved among strains of M. catarrhalis, and preliminary studies indicate that the gene which encodes OMP E remains stable during colonization of the human respiratory tract.
PubMedId: 11349016
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 69, 2001
Authors: S Sethi, T F Murphy
Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD.
PubMedId: 11292642
Journal-article: Clinical microbiology reviews, vol. 14, 2001
Authors: J M Neary, K Yi, R J Karalus, T F Murphy
Abstract: The P2 porin protein is the most abundant protein in the outer membrane of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). Analysis of sequences of P2 from different strains reveals the presence of both heterogeneous and conserved surface-exposed loops of the P2 molecule among strains. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that antibodies to a conserved surface-exposed loop are bactericidal for multiple strains of NTHI and could thus form the basis of vaccines to prevent infection due to NTHI. Polyclonal antiserum to a peptide corresponding to loop 6 was raised and was immunopurified over a loop 6 peptide column. Analysis of the antibodies to whole organisms and peptides corresponding to each of the eight loops of P2 by immunoassays revealed that the antibodies were highly specific for loop 6 of P2. The immunopurified antibodies bound to P2 of 14 of 15 strains in immunoblot assays. These antibodies to loop 6 demonstrated complement-mediated bactericidal killing of 8 of 15 strains. These results support the concept of using conserved regions of the P2 protein as a vaccine antigen.
PubMedId: 11159967
Journal-article: Infection and immunity, vol. 69, 2001
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Chest, vol. 120, pp. 1423, 2001
Authors: B E Barton, T F Murphy
Abstract: Myeloma is a neoplasm thought to "home" to bone marrow. However, evidence for bone-marrow-specific receptors or adhesion molecules expressed on myeloma cells is scanty. Initial myeloma expansion is thought to be due to IL-6 and/or related cytokines. Previous determinations of cytokine expression in bone marrow were performed on bone marrow stromal lines; these findings may not reflect the constitutive pattern of expression in situ. Intracytoplasmic staining for IL-6-like cytokines revealed constitutive expression of some factors in the bone marrow of normal mice, but not spleens. Spleens of myeloma-transplanted SCID mice expressed IL-6-like cytokines, indicative of induction of expression by myeloma. Some cytokines expressed in bone marrow induced myeloma proliferation in the presence of dexamethasone, demonstrating dependence of the myeloma on these cytokines. Our data imply that, rather than "homing" to bone marrow, myeloma cells proliferated within marrow cavities more than in other organs because of growth factors constitutively expressed by bone marrow cells. As myeloma progressed, we observed the induction of growth factor expression in spleen cells. Furthermore, because cytokines other than IL-6 may induce myeloma cell proliferation, therapy aimed at neutralizing IL-6 may not be the most effective method to treat this disease. These findings have implications for both the pathophysiology and therapy of multiple myeloma.
PubMedId: 11023670
Journal-article: Cytokine, vol. 12, 2000
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy, Sanjay Sethi, Michael S. Niederman
Journal-article: Chest, vol. 118, pp. 204-209, 2000
Authors: Sanjay Sethi, Karen Muscarella, Nancy Evans, Karin L. Klingman, Brydon J.B. Grant, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Chest, vol. 118, pp. 1557-1565, 2000
Authors: T. F. Murphy, A. L. Brauer, N. Yuskiw, T. J. Hiltke
Journal-article: Infection and Immunity, vol. 68, pp. 6250-6256, 2000
Authors: T F Murphy, A L Brauer, N Yuskiw, T J Hiltke
PubMedId: 11035732
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 68, 2000
Authors: T F Murphy, S Sethi, M S Niederman
PubMedId: 10893380
Comment: Chest, vol. 118, 2000
Authors: TIMOTHY F. MURPHY
Journal-article: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 19, pp. S9-S16, 2000
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 10821467
Journal Article: The Pediatric infectious disease journal, vol. 19, 2000
Authors: T MURPHY
Journal-article: Seminars in Respiratory Infections, vol. 15, pp. 41-51, 2000
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 10749549
Journal Article: Seminars in respiratory infections, vol. 15, 2000
Authors: T Samukawa, N Yamanaka, S Hollingshead, T F Murphy, H Faden
Abstract: The immune response was evaluated in 11 children with Streptococcus pneumoniae and in 9 children with Moraxella catarrhalis otitis media. The age of the children had a range of 4-32 months. The mean IgG, IgM, and IgA antibody responses to surface protein A (PspA) of S. pneumoniae in sera from children at the acute and convalescent stages were 4864 versus 5831 ng/mL, P<.05, 1075 versus 3752 ng/mL, P<.05, and 67 versus 93 ng/mL, nonsignificant (NS), respectively. The mean IgG, IgM, and IgA antibody responses to the high-molecular-weight outer membrane protein (UspA) of M. catarrhalis in sera from children at acute and convalescent stages were 710 versus 935 mg/mL, NS; 1895 versus 2646 ng/mL, NS; and 121 versus 204 ng/mL, P<.05, respectively. These data show that PspA and UspA are immunogenic in children after otitis media.
PubMedId: 10823798
Journal-article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 181, 1999
Authors: T F Murphy, S Sethi, K L Klingman, A B Brueggemann, G V Doern
Abstract: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae often causes exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and these exacerbations are frequently treated with oral antibiotics. The goals of this study were to determine the frequency of the simultaneous presence of multiple strains of H. influenzae in sputum and to measure the MICs of antibiotics for the isolates. In a prospective study, adults with COPD were seen monthly. Sputum cultures were obtained, and individual colonies were subjected to genomic DNA typing and MIC determinations. Multiple strains of H. influenzae were present simultaneously in the sputum of 26.3% of adults with COPD. In 64.5% of these, MICs of >/=1 antibiotic varied by >/=4-fold among the strains. Therefore, multiple strains of H. influenzae are frequently present simultaneously in the sputum of adults with COPD, and the antimicrobial susceptibility of different strains in the same sputum sometimes differs.
PubMedId: 10395856
Journal-article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 180, 1999
Authors: J M Kyd, A W Cripps, T F Murphy
Abstract: Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis is a common respiratory tract pathogen in man. The bacterium shows a strong tendency to form aggregates in vitro. A variant strain of M. catarrhalis that showed a reduced tendency to form aggregates was selected by successive in-vitro passage in broth culture from which aggregates had settled. The non-clumping variant strain showed alteration in expression of outer-membrane antigens, including the HMW-OMP, an outer-membrane protein of c. 200 kDa, outer-membrane protein CD and lipo-oligosaccharide. A mouse model for pulmonary challenge with M. catarrhalis revealed significant differences in the rate of clearance of the isogenic variant strains from the lung. The parent strain caused enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and more rapid clearance of bacteria from the lungs in comparison to the non-clumping variant. It is concluded that alteration of expression of surface molecules by M. catarrhalis has a significant impact in an in-vivo model of pulmonary clearance.
PubMedId: 9879959
Journal-article: Journal of medical microbiology, vol. 47, 1999
Authors: Richard J. Karalus, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology, vol. 26, pp. 159-166, 1999
Authors: R J Karalus, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 10536303
Journal Article: FEMS immunology and medical microbiology, vol. 26, 1999
Authors: J Kyd, A John, A Cripps, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 10519928
Journal Article: Vaccine, vol. 18, 1999
Authors: T F Murphy, C Kirkham, E DeNardin, S Sethi
PubMedId: 10456903
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 67, 1999
Authors: Wesam H Badr, Donna Loghmanee, Richard J Karalus, Timothy F Murphy, Yasmin Thanavala
Journal-article: Vaccine, vol. 18, pp. 29-37, 1999
Authors: W H Badr, D Loghmanee, R J Karalus, T F Murphy, Y Thanavala
PubMedId: 10501232
Journal Article: Vaccine, vol. 18, 1999
Authors: Karin L. Klingman, Timothy F. Murphy
Book-chapter: Molecular Biology of the Lung, pp. 149-162, 1999
Authors: Timothy??F. Murphy, Jennelle??M. Kyd, Anna John, Charmaine Kirkham, Allan??W. Cripps
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 178, pp. 1667-1675, 1998
Authors: T F Murphy, J M Kyd, A John, C Kirkham, A W Cripps
PubMedId: 9815219
Journal Article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 178, 1998
Authors: Y Harabuchi, H Murakata, M Goh, H Kodama, A Kataura, H Faden, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 9870628
Journal Article: Acta oto-laryngologica, vol. 118, 1998
Authors: J Qiu, D R Hendrixson, E N Baker, T F Murphy, J W St Geme, A G Plaut
PubMedId: 9770539
Journal Article: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 95, 1998
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 9624298
Journal Article: Thorax, vol. 53, 1998
Authors: T F Murphy, K Yi
PubMedId: 9616695
Journal Article: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 830, 1998
Authors: T. F. Murphy
Journal-article: Thorax, vol. 53, pp. 124-128, 1998
Authors: M S Reddy, T F Murphy, H S Faden, J M Bernstein
Abstract: Nontypable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are important pathogens in children and adults. The mechanisms of their adherence to the epithelial cell surface and colonization are not clear. For the pathogen to adhere to the epithelial cell, it must first attach to and penetrate the mucus barrier. Mucin glycoproteins of the mucus layer generally are thought to be involved in bacterial attachment. To understand the precise mechanisms of middle ear mucin-bacterial interactions, we used an overlay binding assay with a highly purified middle ear mucin and outer membrane proteins of both nontypable H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. Outer membrane proteins P2 and P5 were identified as the major components that medicate the binding between nontypable H. influenzae and human middle ear mucin. Moreover, the 57 kDa protein, CD, of the outer membrane protein of M. catarrhalis was found to be the only protein binding human middle ear mucin. Finally, it appears that a protein-oligosaccharide interaction is responsible for binding because asialo-mucin does not bind to either of the bacteria. Knowledge of the specific bacterial-mucin interaction may provide an understanding of the bacterial-epithelial cell colonization. Conversely, comprehension of this interaction between bacteria and purified mucin may be a strategy to prevent colonization of potential pathogens that cause otitis media and sinusitis in children.
PubMedId: 9051060
Journal-article: Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 116, 1997
Authors: TIMOTHY F. MURPHY, KYUNGCHEOL YI
Journal-article: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 830, pp. 353-360, 1997
Authors: Kyungcheol Yi, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy??F. Murphy
Journal-article: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 176, pp. 1247-1252, 1997
Authors: K Yi, S Sethi, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 9359725
Journal Article: The Journal of infectious diseases, vol. 176, 1997
Authors: J. M. Bernstein, D. Dryja, N. Yuskiw, T. F. Murphy
Journal-article: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, vol. 16, pp. 750-753, 1997
Authors: J M Bernstein, D Dryja, N Yuskiw, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 9405947
Journal Article: European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology, vol. 16, 1997
Authors: S Sethi, J M Surface, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 9284135
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 65, 1997
Authors: R Bhushan, C Kirkham, S Sethi, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 9199435
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 65, 1997
Authors: M G Fakih, T F Murphy, M A Pattoli, C S Berenson
PubMedId: 9125549
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 65, 1997
Authors: K Yi, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 8975905
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 65, 1997
Authors: Keya Sen, Daniel J. Sikkema, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Gene, vol. 178, pp. 75-81, 1996
Authors: K Sen, D J Sikkema, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 8921895
Journal Article: Gene, vol. 178, 1996
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 8801433
Journal Article: Microbiological reviews, vol. 60, 1996
Authors: M S Reddy, J M Bernstein, T F Murphy, H S Faden
PubMedId: 8606123
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 64, 1996
Authors: Charles S. Berenson, Melissa A. Patterson, Mark A. Pattoli, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, vol. 59, pp. 371-379, 1996
Authors: C S Berenson, M A Patterson, M A Pattoli, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 8604015
Journal Article: Journal of leukocyte biology, vol. 59, 1996
Authors: S Sethi, T F Murphy, K L Klingman
Journal-article: Molecular Pathology, vol. 49, pp. M1-M7, 1996
Authors: S Sethi, T F Murphy, K L Klingman
PubMedId: 16696037
Journal Article: Clinical molecular pathology, vol. 49, 1996
Authors: K L Klingman, A Pye, T F Murphy, S L Hill
Abstract: Branhamella catarrhalis is increasingly recognized as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in chronic lung diseases. This project defines a population of patients in whom the dynamics of colonization and infection caused by this organism could be studied. A method employing pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of genomic DNA was developed. Twenty-eight patients with bronchiectasis followed prospectively for 26.8 mo (mean) were seen monthly or bimonthly and at the time of a purulent exacerbation. Quantitative bacterial cultures were performed on sputum obtained at each visit. Six of 28 had B. catarrhalis isolated repeatedly. Viable numbers of B. catarrhalis were similar to other bacterial pathogens. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of chromosomal DNA using PFGE was performed on 37 of the 47 isolates recovered. Each patient was colonized by two to four strains with different RFLP patterns. Duration of colonization by the same strain was 2.3 mo (mean). Strain acquisition did not correlate with exacerbation, antibiotic therapy, or season. We conclude that (1) a subset of bronchiectatic patients is colonized with B. catarrhalis, (2) RFLP is a sensitive tool to study strain acquisition, and (3) acquisition and clearance of B. catarrhalis from the respiratory tract is a dynamic process.
PubMedId: 7663786
Journal-article: American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, vol. 152, 1995
Authors: Joel M. Bernstein, Howard S. Faden, Molakala S. Reddy, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 113, pp. P123-P123, 1995
Authors: Chiu Bin Hsiao, Sanjay Sethi, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 19, pp. 215-225, 1995
Authors: C B Hsiao, S Sethi, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 8825909
Journal Article: Microbial pathogenesis, vol. 19, 1995
Authors: S Sethi, S L Hill, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 7890418
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 63, 1995
Authors: K Yi, T F Murphy
Abstract: The P2 protein is the major outer-membrane protein of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) and shows extreme heterogeneity among strains. Based on the analysis of antigenic structure, the P2 protein consists of eight potentially surface-exposed loops. Previous studies of monoclonal antibodies (mABs) to a single strain of NTHI showed that P2 contains potentially immunodominant epitopes in loop 5 of the molecule. The goal of the current work is to test the hypothesis that strain-specific and potentially immunodominant epitopes are located in loop 5 of P2 in other strains of NTHI as well. Gene fragments which encode peptides of loop 5 of strains 2019 and 5657 were cloned into an expression vector and subjected to immunoassays with mABs which recognize surface-exposed, bactericidal, strain-specific epitopes. Each mAB recognized loop 5 of the P2 protein of the homologous strain. Analysis of mutant clones with minor amino acid changes showed a loss of reactivity with the mABs. These observations indicate that loop 5 of the P2 molecule contains strain-specific, abundantly expressed surface-exposed epitopes. This further supports the hypothesis that loop 5 is an immunodominant region of the P2 molecule.
PubMedId: 7536289
Journal-article: Microbial pathogenesis, vol. 17, 1994
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Trends in Microbiology, vol. 2, pp. 427-428, 1994
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 7866699
Journal Article: Trends in microbiology, vol. 2, 1994
Authors: E M Haase, K Yi, G D Morse, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 7520420
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 62, 1994
Authors: K L Klingman, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 8132320
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 62, 1994
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy, Charmaine Kirkham, Alan J. Lesse
Journal-article: Molecular Microbiology, vol. 10, pp. 87-97, 1993
Authors: D Burnett, A Chamba, R A Stockley, T F Murphy, S L Hill
PubMedId: 8346495
Journal-article: Thorax, vol. 48, pp. 638-642, 1993
Authors: T F Murphy, S Sethi
PubMedId: 1416398
Journal-article: The American review of respiratory disease, vol. 146, 1992
Authors: D J Sikkema, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 1280627
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 60, 1992
Authors: T. F. Murphy, M. B. Nelson, M. A. Apicella
Journal-article: Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 165, pp. S203-S205, 1992
Authors: T F Murphy, C Kirkham, D J Sikkema
PubMedId: 1373403
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 60, 1992
Authors: Daniel J. Sikkema, M. Bud Nelson, Michael A. Apicella, Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: Molecular Microbiology, vol. 6, pp. 547-554, 1992
Authors: D J Sikkema, M B Nelson, M A Apicella, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 1560783
Journal Article: Molecular microbiology, vol. 6, 1992
Authors: J.M. Bernstein, H.S. Faden, B.G. Loos, T.F. Murphy, P.L. Ogra
Journal-article: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, vol. 23, pp. 1-13, 1992
Authors: J M Bernstein, H S Faden, B G Loos, T F Murphy, P L Ogra
PubMedId: 1592547
Journal Article: International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology, vol. 23, 1992
Authors: M B Nelson, R S Munson, M A Apicella, D J Sikkema, J P Molleston, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 1713197
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 59, 1991
Authors: P J Moeser, P B Costello, S Gillikin, T F Murphy
PubMedId: 2017633
Case Reports: Reviews of infectious diseases, vol. 13, 1991
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 2204145
Journal Article: Thorax, vol. 45, 1990
Authors: Timothy F. Murphy
Journal-article: The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 88, pp. S41-S45, 1990
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 1692665
Journal Article: The American journal of medicine, vol. 88, 1990
Authors: T F Murphy
Journal-article: Thorax, vol. 45, pp. 552-559, 1990
Authors: T F Murphy, L C Bartos
PubMedId: 2476393
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 57, 1989
Authors: T F Murphy
PubMedId: 2564660
Journal Article: The Pediatric infectious disease journal, vol. 8, 1989
Authors: T F Murphy, L C Bartos
PubMedId: 2843467
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 56, 1988
Authors: M. B. Nelson, T. F. Murphy, H. van Keulen, D. Rekosh, M. A. Apicella
Journal-article: Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 10, pp. S331-S336, 1988
Authors: M B Nelson, T F Murphy, H van Keulen, D Rekosh, M A Apicella
PubMedId: 3055201
Journal Article: Reviews of infectious diseases, vol. 10 Suppl 2, 1988
Authors: T F Murphy, L C Bartos
PubMedId: 2451640
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 56, 1988
Authors: M B Nelson, M A Apicella, T F Murphy, H Vankeulen, L D Spotila, D Rekosh
PubMedId: 3257200
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 56, 1988
Authors: T. F. Murphy, M. A. Apicella
Journal-article: Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 9, pp. 1-15, 1987
Authors: T F Murphy, M A Apicella
PubMedId: 3547567
Journal Article: Reviews of infectious diseases, vol. 9, 1987
Authors: T. F. Murphy, J. M. Bernstein, D. M. Dryja, A. A. Campagnari, M. A. Apicella
Journal-article: Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 156, pp. 723-731, 1987
Authors: T F Murphy, L C Bartos, P A Rice, M B Nelson, K C Dudas, M A Apicella
Abstract: A 16,600-D outer membrane protein is present in all strains of Haemophilus influenzae and antibodies to this protein are present in human serum. This study was designed to assess the role of this outer membrane protein (P6) in nontypeable H. influenzae as a target for human serum bactericidal antibody. P6 was isolated and coupled to an affinity column. Depleting normal human serum of antibodies to P6 by affinity chromatography resulted in reduced bactericidal activity of that serum for nontypeable H. influenzae. Immunopurified antibodies to P6 from human serum were bactericidal. Finally, preincubation of bacteria with a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a surface epitope on P6, inhibited human serum bactericidal killing. Taken together, these experiments establish that P6 is a target for human bactericidal antibodies. This observation provides evidence that P6 plays a potentially important role in human immunity to infection by nontypeable H. influenzae.
PubMedId: 2428838
Journal-article: The Journal of clinical investigation, vol. 78, 1986
Authors: T F Murphy, M A Apicella
PubMedId: 3876283
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 50, 1985
Presented by CUBS © 2022