UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Mark Ehrensberger UB Profile
Biomedical Engineering
Assistant Professor
445 Biomedical Research Building
Buffalo NY 14260
716-829-3944
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Emily K. Brooks, Richard P. Brooks, Mark T. Ehrensberger
PubMedId: 27987699
Journal-article: Materials Science and Engineering: C, vol. 71, pp. 200-205, 2017
Authors: Mary Canty, Nicole Luke-Marshall, Anthony Campagnari, Mark Ehrensberger
PubMedId: 27890730
Journal-article: Acta Biomaterialia, vol. 48, pp. 451-460, 2017
Authors: Soni Prasad, Mark Ehrensberger, Monica Prasad Gibson, Hyeongil Kim, Edward A. Monaco
Journal-article: Journal of Oral Biosciences, vol. 57, pp. 192-199, 2015
Authors: Emily Brooks, Menachem Tobias, Kevin Krautsak, Mark Ehrensberger
PubMedId: 24610893
Journal-article: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, vol. 102, pp. 1445-1453, 2014
Authors: Evgeny Dyskin, John M Marzo, Craig Howard, Mark Ehrensberger
Abstract: This study was conducted to assess whether a single-row suture anchor repair of a bony Bankart lesion comprising 19% of the glenoid length restores peak translational force and glenoid depth compared with the intact shoulder. Nine thawed adult cadaveric shoulders were dissected and mounted in 45 of abduction and 30 of external rotation. A bony Bankart lesion was simulated with an anterior longitudinal osteotomy, parallel to the superoinferior axis of the glenoid, equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length. The humeral head was displaced 10mm anteriorly at a speed of 2mm/s with a 50-N compressive load applied. Testing was performed with the glenoid intact, a simulated lesion, and the lesion repaired with 3 single-row suture anchors. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) peak translational force and glenoid depth were reported. The Friedman test and post hoc comparisons with the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used for between-group analyses. Peak translational force decreased after osteotomy (13.7N; IQR, 9.6 to 15.5N; P= .01) and increased after the repair (18.3N; IQR, 18.3 to 20.6N; P= .01) compared with the intact shoulder (23.7N; IQR, 16.4 to 29.9N). Glenoid depth significantly decreased after the osteotomy (0.2mm; IQR,-0.6 to 0.7mm) compared with baseline (1.7mm; IQR, 1.3 to 2.0mm; P= .01) and increased after repair (0.8mm; IQR, 0.1 to 1.0mm; P= .03) compared with the osteotomized shoulder. The glenoid depth of the repair was less than the baseline value (P= .01). Repair of an anterior bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length with 3 suture anchors restored the peak translational force needed to anteriorly displace the humerus relative to the glenoid; however, this technique failed to restore the natural glenoid depth in a laboratory setting. Our findings describe the inability of a single-row suture anchor repair to provide anatomic fixation of the bony Bankart lesion equivalent to 19% of the glenoid length.
PubMedId: 25150408
Journal-article: Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association, vol. 30, 2013
Authors: Mark Ehrensberger, Donald W. Hohman, Kurt Duncan, Craig Howard, Leslie Bisson
Abstract: A novel biomechanical test method was implemented to compare the mechanical performance of two femoral fixation anchors (AperFix(r), Cayenne Medical, Scottsdale, AZ, USA or the AppianFx(r), KFx Medical, Carlsbad, CA, USA) that were utilized in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions were performed in 20 porcine femurs by using bovine extensor tendon grafts secured with 9 mm femoral anchors (AperFix(r) or AppianFx(r)). 10 specimens were tested for each anchor type. Infrared position sensors determined the repair construct displacements during conditioning (20 cycles at 5-50 N at 0.25 Hz), cyclic loading (1500 cycles at 50-200 N at 1 Hz), and ultimate loading (150 mm/min). Outcomes included tendon elongation, anchor displacement, stiffness, maximum load, yield load, and load at 5mm of anchor displacement. It was hypothesized that there would be no differences in the outcomes of these two devices. Independent measure t-tests compared the performance of the devices (p<0.05). The performance of the two anchors was comparable during the cyclic loading. During ultimate loading, a statistically higher yield load (p<0.01) and a load at 5mm of anchor displacement (p<0.01) were demonstrated for the AppianFx(r) as compared to AperFix(r). Maximum load and stiffness were not significantly different. Given the good clinical track record of the AperFix(r), the comparable, and in some cases superior, the biomechanical data presented here for the AppianFx(r) are encouraging for their clinical implementation. This study also introduced a novel test method that directly tracks the relevant construct displacements during cyclic and ultimate loading tests of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions.
PubMedId: 23294848
Journal-article: Clinical Biomechanics, vol. 28, pp. 193-198, 2013
Authors: Christopher N. Hein, Jennifer Gurske Deperio, Mark T. Ehrensberger, John M. Marzo
Journal-article: The Knee, vol. 18, pp. 189-192, 2011
Authors: Mark T. Ehrensberger, Jeremy L. Gilbert
PubMedId: 20336755
Journal-article: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, vol. 9999A, pp. NA-NA, 2010
Authors: Mark T. Ehrensberger, Jeremy L. Gilbert
PubMedId: 20091908
Journal-article: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, vol. 9999B, pp. NA-NA, 2010
Authors: Mark T. Ehrensberger, Jeremy L. Gilbert
PubMedId: 19591235
Journal-article: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, vol. 9999A, pp. NA-NA, 2009
Authors: Mark T. Ehrensberger, Shiril Sivan, Jeremy L. Gilbert
Journal-article: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, pp. n/a-n/a, 2009
Authors: Leslie J Bisson, Leslie M Manohar, Ryan D Wilkins, Jennifer Gurske-Deperio, Mark T Ehrensberger
Abstract: Despite technical advances in rotator cuff surgery, recurrent or persistent defects in the repaired tendon continue to occur. Improved strength of sutures and suture anchors has resulted in the most common site of failure being the suture-tendon interface. The type of suture material used has a significant effect on the biomechanics of the suture-tendon interface. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-two bovine infraspinatus specimens were randomly assigned to simple suture fixation using No. 2 Fiberwire, Ultrabraid, Orthocord, or Ethibond. Each specimen was subjected to cyclic testing from 5 to 30 N for 30 cycles, followed by load-to-failure testing. Cyclic testing revealed significantly greater elongation with Ultrabraid, whereas peak-to-peak displacements were lowest for Fiberwire and greatest for Orthocord. Load-to-failure testing revealed no significant differences between any suture material for ultimate tensile load. Fiberwire and Orthocord repairs had the highest stiffness. The most common failure mode during load-to-failure testing was suture breakage in Ethibond specimens and suture cutting through the tendon in the polyblend suture specimens. The type of suture material has a significant effect on the biomechanical behavior of the suture-tendon interface. The type of suture may influence early gap formation and ultimate healing of rotator cuff repairs.
PubMedId: 18359819
Journal-article: The American journal of sports medicine, vol. 36, 2008
Presented by CUBS © 2022