UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Maria Testa UB Profile
Psychology
Senior Research Scientist
102 Main St
Buffalo NY 14203
716-887-2560
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Jennifer A. Livingston, Amy L. Hequembourg, Maria Testa
Book-chapter: Encyclopedia of Adolescence, pp. 3565-3574, 2018
Authors: Naeemah Abrahams, Katherine W. Bogen, Leanne R. Brecklin, Robert W.S. Coulter, Christina M. Dardis, Kelly Cue Davis, Anne P. DePrince, Katie M. Edwards, Kerry L. Gagnon, Grisel M. Garc??a, William H. George, Christine A. Gidycz, Amanda K. Gilmore, Hollie F. Granato, Jocelyn A. Hollander, Caroline Kuo, Jennifer A. Livingston, Gabriela Lopez, Catherine Mathews, Heather L. McCauley, Amy A. McConnell, Terri L. Messman-Moore, Elizabeth C. Neilson, Jeanette Norris, Daniel Oesterle, Lindsay M. Orchowski, Hanna T. Pinsky, Heidi Resnick, Jenny K. Rinehart, Ryan Ross, Emily F. Rothman, Charlene Y. Senn, Stephanie N. Sessarego, Tracy Simpson, Cynthia A. Stappenbeck, Meg Stone, Maria Testa, Sarah E. Ullman, Amy S. Untied, Kristen N. Vitek, Rhiana Wegner, Elizabeth A. Yeater, Miryam Yusufov, Tina Zawacki
Book-chapter: Sexual Assault Risk Reduction and Resistance, pp. xv-xvii, 2018
Authors: Jennifer A. Livingston, Jaye L. Derrick, Weijun Wang, Maria Testa, Amanda B. Nickerson, Dorothy L. Espelage, Kathleen E. Miller
Journal-article: Journal of Child and Family Studies, 2018
Authors: Maria Testa, Jennifer A. Livingston
Book-chapter: Sexual Assault Risk Reduction and Resistance, pp. 135-172, 2018
Authors: Maria Testa, Michael J. Cleveland
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 78, pp. 5-13, 2017
Authors: Cory A. Crane, MacKenzie L. Licata, Robert C. Schlauch, Maria Testa, Caroline J. Easton
Journal-article: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, vol. 31, pp. 21-26, 2017
Authors: Jaye L. Derrick, Maria Testa
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 78, pp. 213-221, 2017
Authors: Jaye L Derrick, Maria Testa
PubMedId: 28317501
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 78, 2017
Authors: Cory A Crane, Maria Testa, Robert C Schlauch, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Self-reported marijuana use has been associated with poor relationship functioning and decreased stability over time. The present study examined the behavioral interactions of couples with concordant and discordant patterns of marijuana use during conflict, using individual self-reports and observation by independent coders. Heavy drinking community couples (N = 149) participated in a conflict resolution paradigm. Interactions were recorded and coded by nave coders. Approximately 30% of the sample reported past year marijuana use. Actor-Partner Interdependence Models and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used to evaluate the individual and interactive effects of dyadic marijuana use on maladaptive relationship functioning. A Robust Actor Partner Marijuana Use interaction was detected for a range of behavioral outcomes, assessed by both self-report and direct observation, including relationship satisfaction, anger experience, patterns of demand and withdrawal during conflict, constructive behaviors, and overall relationship quality. Specifically, couples in which both partners used or abstained from marijuana displayed more adaptive relationship functioning across indicators relative to couples in which only 1 partner identified as a marijuana user. This pattern was particularly strong for couples in which the female partner used marijuana and the male partner did not. Couples with discordant, rather than concordant, marijuana use displayed distinct conflict resolution behaviors that were consistent with the long-term negative relationship outcomes that have been observed in previous studies. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMedId: 27454369
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 30, 2016
Authors: Catharine E. Fairbairn, Maria Testa
Journal-article: Clinical Psychological Science, vol. 5, pp. 74-84, 2016
Authors: Maria Testa, Michael J Cleveland
PubMedId: 27936357
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 78, 2016
Authors: Kathleen A. Parks, Kristine Levonyan-Radloff, Ronda L. Dearing, Amy Hequembourg, Maria Testa
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2016
Authors: Maria Testa, Kathleen A. Parks, Joseph H. Hoffman, Cory A. Crane, Kenneth E. Leonard, Kathleen Shyhalla
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 76, pp. 507-515, 2015
Authors: Maria Testa, Kathleen A Parks, Joseph H Hoffman, Cory A Crane, Kenneth E Leonard, Kathleen Shyhalla
PubMedId: 26098025
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 76, 2015
Authors: Maria Testa, Whitney C Brown
PubMedId: 25839050
Journal Article: Current opinion in psychology, vol. 5, 2015
Authors: Maria Testa, Cory A. Crane, Brian M. Quigley, Ash Levitt, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 75, pp. 249-258, 2014
Authors: Jaye L Derrick, Maria Testa, Kenneth E Leonard
Keywords: daily diary domestic violence dyadic data analysis hierarchical linear modeling intimate partner aggression intimate partner violence multilevel modeling
Abstract: Agreement within couples regarding the occurrence of aggression is surprisingly low. Survey research often collapses across partners' reports to create a pooled estimate of aggression in the relationship. This method ignores possible differences in partners' perceptions of the event, potentially weakening researchers' ability to detect consequences of aggression. The current study examines both partners' reports of verbal aggression to determine whether aggression reported by only one partner influences both partners' short-term outcomes. We used a 56-day daily diary to examine the effect of verbal aggression on short-term negative outcomes. We examined whether aggression reported by either partner is sufficient to predict consequences for both partners, or if an individual must report aggression to experience consequences. Victims' reports of receiving verbal aggression were a better predictor of next day victim consequences than perpetrators' reports. Perpetrators' reports of perpetrating verbal aggression were a better predictor of next day perpetrator consequences than victims' reports. Days when partners agreed that aggression had occurred generally predicted the worst outcomes. People's own reports of verbal aggression are the best predictor of short-term consequences. Pooling partner reports of aggression may make it more difficult to understand the consequences of intimate partner aggression.
PubMedId: 25346861
Journal-article: Psychology of violence, vol. 4, 2014
Authors: Maria Testa, Cory A Crane, Brian M Quigley, Ash Levitt, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 24650819
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 75, 2014
Authors: Ash Levitt, Jaye L Derrick, Maria Testa
PubMedId: 24650821
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 75, 2014
Authors: Ash Levitt, Jaye L. Derrick, Maria Testa
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2014
Authors: Maria Testa, Jaye L Derrick
PubMedId: 24341618
Journal Article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, 2013
Authors: Cory A Crane, Maria Testa, Jaye L Derrick, Kenneth E Leonard
Keywords: actor-partner interdependence anger conflict heavy episodic drinking self-control
Abstract: An emerging literature suggests that temporary deficits in the ability to inhibit impulsive urges may be proximally associated with intimate partner aggression. The current study examined the experience of alcohol use and the depletion of self-control in the prediction of relationship functioning. Daily diary data collected from 118 heterosexual couples were analyzed using parallel multi-level Actor-Partner Interdependence Models to assess the effects of heavy episodic drinking and depletion of self-control across partners on outcomes of participant-reported daily arguing with and anger toward an intimate partner. Heavy episodic drinking among actors predicted greater arguing but failed to interact with either actor or partner depletion. We also found that greater arguing was reported on days of high congruent actor and partner depletion. Both actor and partner depletion, as well as their interaction, predicted greater partner-specific anger. The current results highlight the importance of independently assessing partner effects (i.e., depletion of self-control), which interact dynamically with disinhibiting actor effects, in the prediction of daily adverse relationship functioning. Results offer further support for the development of prospective individualized and couples-based interventions for partner conflict.
PubMedId: 24700558
Journal-article: Aggressive behavior, vol. 40, 2013
Authors: Jennifer A. Livingston, Laina Y. Bay-Cheng, Amy L. Hequembourg, Maria Testa, Julie S. Downs
Journal-article: Psychology of Women Quarterly, vol. 37, pp. 38-50, 2012
Authors: Maria Testa, Joseph H. Hoffman, Jennifer A. Livingston
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2011
Authors: Jennifer A. Livingston, Amy L. Hequembourg, Maria Testa
Book-chapter: Encyclopedia of Adolescence, pp. 2692-2699, 2011
Authors: Maria Testa, Joseph H. Hoffman, Jennifer A. Livingston
Journal-article: Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 35, pp. 363-371, 2011
Authors: Maria Testa, Joseph H. Hoffman, Jennifer A. Livingston
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2010
Authors: Maria Testa, Joseph H. Hoffman, Jennifer A. Livingston
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 78, pp. 249-259, 2010
Authors: Maria Testa, Joseph H. Hoffman, Jennifer A. Livingston, Rob Turrisi
Journal-article: Prevention Science, vol. 11, pp. 308-318, 2010
Authors: Jennifer A. Livingston, Maria Testa, Joseph H. Hoffman, Michael Windle
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2010
Authors: Maria Testa, Jennifer A. Livingston
Journal-article: Substance Use & Misuse, vol. 44, pp. 1349-1376, 2009
Authors: Maria Testa, Carol Vanzile-Tamsen, Jennifer A. Livingston, Amy M. Buddie
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 67, pp. 665-674, 2006
Authors: Maria Testa, Jennifer A Livingston, Kenneth E Leonard
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, pp. 1649-1664, 2003
Authors: Maria Testa, Jennifer A. Livingston, R. Lorraine Collins
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2000
Authors: Maria Testa, Cory Crane, Kenneth E. Leonard
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Kathleen A. Parks, Kristina Levonyan-Radloff, Amy Hequembourg, Ronda L. Dearing, Maria Testa
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Kenneth Leonard, B. Quigley, M. Testa, R. Houston
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: K. L. Leonard, B. Quigley, M. Testa, R. Houston
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Jennifer A. Livingston, Maria Testa, Carol VanZile-Tamsen
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Maria Testa, Jennifer Livingston
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Presented by CUBS © 2022