UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Marilyn E Morris UB Profile
Pharmacy
SUNY Distinguished Professor and Chair
352 Kapoor Hall
Buffalo NY 14214
716-645-4839
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Melanie A. Felmlee, Bridget L. Morse, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 23, 2021
Authors: Xiaowen Guan, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 22, 2020
Authors: Robert S. Jones, Donna Ruszaj, Mark D. Parker, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 48, pp. 788-795, 2020
Authors: Melanie A. Felmlee, Robert S. Jones, Vivian Rodriguez-Cruz, Kristin E. Follman, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmacological Reviews, vol. 72, pp. 466-485, 2020
Authors: Mark A. Bryniarski, Tianjing Ren, Abbas R. Rizvi, Anthony M. Snyder, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutics, vol. 12, pp. 963, 2020
Authors: Mark A. Bryniarski, Benjamin M. Yee, Lee D. Chaves, Corrine M. Stahura, Rabi Yacoub, Marilyn E. Morris
PubMedId: 32736701
Journal-article: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 529, pp. 740-746, 2020
Authors: Xiaowen Guan, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 37, 2019
Authors: Kristin E. Follman, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol. 370, pp. 84-91, 2019
Authors: Xiaowen Guan, Vivian Rodriguez-Cruz, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 21, 2019
Authors: Robert S. Jones, Chengjian Tu, Ming Zhang, Jun Qu, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Molecular Pharmacology, vol. 96, pp. 364-376, 2019
Authors: Robert S Jones, Mark D Parker, Marilyn E Morris
Keywords: bumetanide diet drugfood interactions flavonoids monocarboxylate transporter 6 slc16a5 transporters
Abstract: Monocarboxylate transporter 6 (MCT6; SLC16A5) has been recognized for its role as a xenobiotic transporter, with characterized substrates probenecid, bumetanide, and nateglinide. To date, the impact of commonly ingested dietary compounds on MCT6 function has not been investigated, and therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate a variety of flavonoids for their potential MCT6-specific interactions. Flavonoids are a large group of polyphenolic phytochemicals found in commonly consumed plant-based products that have been recognized for their dietary health benefits. The uptake of bumetanide in human MCT6 gene-transfected Xenopus laevis oocytes was significantly decreased in the presence of a variety of flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, luteolin, phloretin, and morin), but was not significantly affected by flavonoid glycosides (e.g., naringin, rutin, phlorizin). The IC
PubMedId: 28513167
Journal Article: Molecular pharmaceutics, vol. 14, 2018
Authors: Xiaowen Guan, Mark A. Bryniarski, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 21, 2018
Authors: Mark A Bryniarski, Benjamin M Yee, Irum Jaffri, Lee D Chaves, Jin Ah Yu, Xiaowen Guan, Nazanin Ghavam, Rabi Yacoub, Marilyn E Morris
PubMedId: 29949391
1: American journal of physiology. Renal physiology, vol. 315, 2018
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Rutwij A. Dave, Kristin E. Follman
Book-chapter: Encyclopedia of Signaling Molecules, pp. 3175-3189, 2018
Authors: Xiaowen Guan, Donna Ruszaj, Marilyn E Morris
Keywords: AZD3965 LC/MS/MS Monocarboxylate transporters Pharmacokinetics Plasma Tumor tissue
Abstract: AZD3965, a pyrole pyrimidine derivative, is a potent and orally bioavailable inhibitor of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), currently in a Phase I clinical trial in UK for lymphomas and solid tumors. There is currently no published assay for AZD3965. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate a LC/MS/MS assay for quantifying AZD3965 in mouse plasma and tumor tissue. Protein precipitation with 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile was used for sample preparation. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 column followed by tandem mass spectrometry detection in multiple reaction monitoring mode with utilizing Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization. AR-C155858 was used as the internal standard. The inter-day and intra-day precision and accuracy of quality control samples evaluated in plasma and tumor tissue were less than 7% of the nominal concentrations. The extraction recovery, matrix effect and stability values were all within acceptable levels. Sample dilution integrity, accessed by diluting plasma spiked with AZD3965 10-fold with blank plasma, was 101%. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and upper limit of quantification (ULOQ) were 0.15ng/mL and 12g/mL, respectively, in plasma. The assay of AZD3965 in tumor tissue was also validated with good precision and accuracy. The LLOQ was 0.15ng/mL in tumor tissue. This assay was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic and murine 4T1 breast tumor xenograft studies of AZD3965 in mice.
PubMedId: 29674138
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis, vol. 155, 2017
Authors: Kristin E Follman, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Renal impairment (RI) is a major health concern with a growing prevalence. RI leads to various physiologic changes, in addition to a decrease in glomerular filtration rate, that impact the pharmacokinetics (PK) and, specifically, the renal clearance (CL
PubMedId: 29490902
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 46, 2017
Authors: Kristin E Follman, Rutwij A Dave, Marilyn E Morris
Keywords: GFR GHB kidney disease pharmacokinetics renal transport
Abstract: Renal impairment (RI) significantly impacts the clearance of drugs through changes in the glomerular filtration rate, protein binding and alterations in the expression of renal drug transport proteins and hepatic metabolizing enzymes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate quantitatively the effects of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of drugs undergoing renal transporter-mediated reabsorption. A previously published semi-mechanistic kidney model incorporating physiologically relevant fluid reabsorption and transporter-mediated active renal reabsorption (PMID: 26341876) was utilized in this study. The probe drug/transporter pair utilized was -hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and monocarboxylate transporter 1 (SCL16A1, MCT1). -Hydroxybutyric acid concentrations in the blood and amount excreted into urine were simulated using ADAPT 5 for the i.v. dose range of 200-1500mg/kg in rats and the impact of renal impairment on CL
PubMedId: 29635775
Journal Article: Biopharmaceutics & drug disposition, vol. 39, 2017
Authors: Melanie A Felmlee, Bridget L Morse, Kristin E Follman, Marilyn E Morris
Keywords: Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid Monocarboxylate transporters Toxicokinetics
Abstract: The drug of abuse -hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) demonstrates complex toxicokinetics with dose-dependent metabolic and renal clearance. GHB is a substrate of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) which are responsible for the saturable renal reabsorption of GHB. MCT expression is observed in many tissues and therefore may impact the tissue distribution of GHB. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the tissue distribution kinetics of GHB at supratherapeutic doses. GHB (400, 600, and 800mg/kg iv) or GHB 600mg/kg plus L-lactate (330mg/kg iv bolus followed by 121mg/kg/h infusion) was administered to rats and blood and tissues were collected for up to 330min post-dose. K
PubMedId: 29280004
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 20, 2017
Authors: Marilyn E Morris, Vivian Rodriguez-Cruz, Melanie A Felmlee
Keywords: blood-brain barrier blood-cerebral spinal fluid barrier efflux transporters uptake transporters
Abstract: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) separate the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the systemic circulation and represent a barrier to the uptake of both endogenous compounds and xenobiotics into the brain. For compounds whose passive diffusion is limited due to their ionization or hydrophilicity, membrane transporters can facilitate their uptake across the BBB or BCSFB. Members of the solute carrier (SLC) and ATP-binding case (ABC) families are present on these barriers. Differences exist in the localization and expression of transport proteins between the BBB and BCSFB, resulting in functional differences in transport properties. This review focuses on the expression, membrane localization, and different isoforms present at each barrier. Diseases that affect the central nervous system including brain tumors, HIV, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke affect the integrity and expression of transporters at the BBB and BCSFB and will be briefly reviewed.
PubMedId: 28664465
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 19, 2017
Authors: Bridget L. Morse, Gurkishan S. Chadha, Melanie A. Felmlee, Kristin E. Follman, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, vol. 43, pp. 686-693, 2017
Authors: Rutwij A. Dave, Kristin E. Follman, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 19, pp. 1449-1460, 2017
Authors: R S Jones, M E Morris
Abstract: Solute carrier (SLC) transporters represent 52 families of membrane transport proteins that function in endogenous compound homeostasis and xenobiotic disposition, and have been exploited in drug delivery and therapeutic targeting strategies. In particular, the SLC16 family thatencodes for the 14 isoforms of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family plays a significant role in the absorption, tissue distribution, and clearance of both endogenous and exogenous compounds. MCTs are required for the transport of essential cell nutrients and for cellular metabolic and pH regulation. Recent publications have indicated their novel roles in disease, and thus their potential as biomarkers and new therapeutic targets in disease are under investigation. More research into MCT isoform function, specificity, expression, and regulation will allow researchers to exploit the potential utility of MCTs in the clinic as therapeutic targets and prognostic factors of disease.
PubMedId: 27351344
Journal Article: Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, vol. 100, 2016
Authors: Rutwij A Dave, Marilyn E Morris
Keywords: Analytical chemistry Computational ADME Computer aided drug design High throughput technologies In silico modeling ROC curve analysis Solubility
Abstract: This research describes a rapid solubility classification approach that could be used in the discovery and development of new molecular entities. Compounds (N=635) were divided into two groups based on information available in the literature: high solubility (BDDCS/BCS 1/3) and low solubility (BDDCS/BCS 2/4). We established decision rules for determining solubility classes using measured log solubility in molar units (MLogSM) or measured solubility (MSol) in mg/ml units. ROC curve analysis was applied to determine statistically significant threshold values of MSol and MLogSM. Results indicated that NMEs with MLogSM>-3.05 or MSol>0.30mg/mL will have 85% probability of being highly soluble and new molecular entities with MLogSM-3.05 or MSol0.30mg/mL will have 85% probability of being poorly soluble. When comparing solubility classification using the threshold values of MLogSM or MSol with BDDCS, we were able to correctly classify 85% of compounds. We also evaluated solubility classification of an independent set of 108 orally administered drugs using MSol (0.3mg/mL) and our method correctly classified 81% and 95% of compounds into high and low solubility classes, respectively. The high/low solubility classification using MLogSM or MSol is novel and independent of traditionally used dose number criteria.
PubMedId: 27349790
Journal Article: International journal of pharmaceutics, vol. 511, 2016
Authors: Rutwij A Dave, Marilyn E Morris
Keywords: ROC curve analysis cLogD cLogP new molecular entities urinary excretion
Abstract: In this study, a quantitative threshold was determined for the high/low extent of urinary excretion (UE) of compounds in humans, using a straightforward but robust statistical method known as receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, and also 18 potential physicochemical determinants of UE were evaluated. Data on the percent of drug excreted unchanged into the urine, %Ae , were used to determine the threshold for high/low UE. Compounds can be divided into high/low UE groups using the threshold value of Ae =16.8%, namely those with Ae >16.8% are classified as high UE and those with Ae 16.8% as low UE. The %Ae negatively correlated with cLogP (r=-0.56); however, cLogP could not quantitatively predict the value of %Ae (R(2) adj. = 0.32). Several determinants of the extent of UE, including cLogP, ACD labs cLogP and ACD labs cLogD(pH=7.4) , were successfully evaluated as a priori indicators of the extent of UE using two cut-off values for each parameter. Moreover, 87% of the 90 compounds in the external validation set were correctly classified using this approach. Analysis of the physicochemical spaces of compounds in these two groups showed significant overlap, which hinders the a priori determination of the extent of UE of compounds using a single threshold/cut-off value of simple physicochemical parameters. In conclusion, 16.8% is a quantitative threshold value to distinguish between high and low UE and new molecular entities with cLogP and ACD labs cLogP values of 0.7 and 1.0 and ACD labs cLogD(pH=7.4) values of 0.0 and 0.5 could be identified as exhibiting high and low UE, respectively. Copyright 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMedId: 27122230
Journal Article: Biopharmaceutics & drug disposition, vol. 37, 2016
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Xiaowen Guan
Book-chapter: Drug Delivery, pp. 62-102, 2016
Authors: Gurkishan S. Chadha, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Current Pharmacology Reports, vol. 2, pp. 45-56, 2016
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Rutwij A. Dave, Kristin E. Follman
Book-chapter: Encyclopedia of Signaling Molecules, pp. 1-15, 2016
Authors: Rutwij A. Dave, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, vol. 42, pp. 497-513, 2015
Authors: Gurkishan S. Chadha, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 17, pp. 1464-1474, 2015
Authors: Gurkishan S. Chadha, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 17, pp. 965-975, 2015
Authors: R. A. Dave, M. E. Morris
Abstract: Renal clearance (CLR), a major route of elimination for many drugs and drug metabolites, represents the net result of glomerular filtration, active secretion and reabsorption, and passive reabsorption. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPKR) to predict CLR of drugs or drug-like compounds in humans. Human CLR data for 382 compounds were obtained from the literature. Step-wise multiple linear regression was used to construct QSPKR models for training sets and their predictive performance was evaluated using internal validation (leave-one-out method). All qualified models were validated externally using test sets. QSPKR models were also constructed for compounds in accordance with their 1) net elimination pathways (net secretion, extensive net secretion, net reabsorption, and extensive net reabsorption), 2) net elimination clearances (net secretion clearance, CLSEC; or net reabsorption clearance, CLREAB), 3) ion status, and 4) substrate/inhibitor specificity for renal transporters. We were able to predict 1) CLREAB (Q(2) = 0.77) of all compounds undergoing net reabsorption; 2) CLREAB (Q(2) = 0.81) of all compounds undergoing extensive net reabsorption; and 3) CLR for substrates and/or inhibitors of OAT1/3 (Q(2) = 0.81), OCT2 (Q(2) = 0.85), MRP2/4 (Q(2) = 0.78), P-gp (Q(2) = 0.71), and MATE1/2K (Q(2) = 0.81). Moreover, compounds undergoing net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption predominantly belonged to Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System classes 1 and 2. In conclusion, constructed parsimonious QSPKR models can be used to predict CLR of compounds that 1) undergo net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption and 2) are substrates and/or inhibitors of human renal transporters.
PubMedId: 25352657
Journal-article: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 43, pp. 73-81, 2014
Authors: Guohua An, Xiaodong Wang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1) has been reported to be involved in the nephrotoxicity of many anionic xenobiotics. As current clinically used OAT1 inhibitors are often associated with safety issues, identifying potent OAT1 inhibitors with little toxicity is of great value in reducing OAT1-mediated drug nephrotoxicity. Flavonoids are a class of polyphenolic compounds with exceptional safety records. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of 18 naturally occurring flavonoids, and some of their glycosides, on the uptake of para-aminohippuric acid (PAH) in both OAT1-expressing and OAT1-negative LLC-PK1 cells. Most flavonoid aglycones produced substantial decreases in PAH uptake in OAT1-expressing cells. Among the flavonoids screened, fisetin, luteolin, morin, and quercetin exhibited the strongest effect and produced complete inhibition of OAT1-mediated PAH uptake at a concentration of 50 M. Further concentration-dependent studies revealed that both morin and luteolin are potent OAT1 inhibitors, with IC50 values of <0.3 and 0.47 M, respectively. In contrast to the tested flavonoid aglycones, all flavonoid glycosides had negligible or small effects on OAT1. In addition, the role of OAT1 in the uptake of fisetin, luteolin, morin, and quercetin was investigated and fisetin was found to be a substrate of OAT1. Taken together, our results indicate that flavonoids are a novel class of OAT1 modulators. Considering the high consumption of flavonoids in the diet and in herbal products, OAT1-mediated flavonoid-drug interactions may be clinically relevant. Further investigation is warranted to evaluate the nephroprotective role of flavonoids in relation to drug-induced nephrotoxicity mediated by the OAT1 pathway.
PubMedId: 25002746
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 42, 2014
Authors: Marilyn E Morris, Rutwij A Dave
Abstract: Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC)-a naturally occurring isothiocyanate in cruciferous vegetables-has been extensively studied as a chemopreventive agent in several preclinical species and in humans. Pharmacokinetic features of unchanged PEITC are (I) linear and first-order absorption, (II) high protein binding and capacity-limited tissue distribution, and (III) reversible metabolism and capacity-limited hepatic elimination. Membrane transport of PEITC is mediated by BCRP, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 1, and MRP2 transporters belonging to the ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) family. PEITC is metabolized by glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the liver, with the glutathione conjugate of PEITC undergoing further conversion to mercapturic acid by N-acetyl transferase in rats and humans. PEITC modulates the activity and expression of numerous phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes and can inhibit the metabolism of procarcinogens to form carcinogens and increase carcinogen elimination. In recent years, several in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacodynamics of PEITC in breast cancer that include cancer cell apoptosis by upregulation of apoptotic genes, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase by generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of intracellular glutathione, downregulation of the estrogen receptor, decrease in sensitivity to estrogen, and inhibition of tumor metastasis. Inhibition of angiogenesis is one of the recently reported mechanisms of breast cancer prevention by PEITC. Complex pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEITC necessitate a systems-biology approach in parallel with PK/PD modeling to develop PEITC as a therapeutic agent for treating cancers.
PubMedId: 24821055
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 16, 2014
Authors: Nisha Vijay, Bridget L. Morse, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 32, pp. 1894-1906, 2014
Authors: Nisha Vijay, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 103, pp. 3310-3315, 2014
Authors: Bridget L. Morse, Nisha Vijay, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 16, pp. 756-770, 2014
Authors: Nisha Vijay, Marilyn Morris
Journal-article: Current Pharmaceutical Design, vol. 20, pp. 1487-1498, 2014
Authors: Guofeng You, Marilyn E. Morris
Book-chapter: Drug Transporters, pp. 1-6, 2014
Authors: Nisha Vijay, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are known to mediate the transport of short chain monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate and butyrate. Currently, fourteen members of this transporter family have been identified by sequence homology, of which only the first four members (MCT1- MCT4) have been shown to mediate the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates. Another transporter family involved in the transport of endogenous monocarboxylates is the sodium coupled MCTs (SMCTs). These act as a symporter and are dependent on a sodium gradient for their functional activity. MCT1 is the predominant transporter among the MCT isoforms and is present in almost all tissues including kidney, intestine, liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. The various isoforms differ in terms of their substrate specificity and tissue localization. Due to the expression of these transporters in the kidney, intestine, and brain, they may play an important role in influencing drug disposition. Apart from endogenous short chain monocarboxylates, they also mediate the transport of exogenous drugs such as salicylic acid, valproic acid, and simvastatin acid. The influence of MCTs on drug pharmacokinetics has been extensively studied for -hydroxybutyrate (GHB) including distribution of this drug of abuse into the brain and the results will be summarized in this review. The physiological role of these transporters in the brain and their specific cellular localization within the brain will also be discussed. This review will also focus on utilization of MCTs as potential targets for drug delivery into the brain including their role in the treatment of malignant brain tumors.
PubMedId: 23789956
Journal Article: Current pharmaceutical design, vol. 20, 2013
Authors: B. L. Morse, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol. 346, pp. 504-513, 2013
Authors: Samuel A. Roiko, Nisha Vijay, Melanie A. Felmlee, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 30, pp. 1338-1348, 2013
Authors: B. L. Morse, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol. 345, pp. 102-110, 2013
Authors: Wolfgang F Richter, Suraj G Bhansali, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The subcutaneous (SC) route is of growing interest for the administration of biotherapeutics. Key products on the biotherapeutic market such as insulins, but also several immunoglobulins or Fc-fusion proteins, are administered SC. Despite the importance of the SC route, the available knowledge about the processes involved in the SC absorption of biotherapeutics is limited. This review summarizes available information on the physiology of the SC tissue and on the pharmacokinetic processes after SC administration including "first pass catabolism" at the administration site as well as transport in the extracellular matrix of the SC tissue, followed by absorption into the blood circulation or the lymphatic system. Both monoclonal antibodies and other biotherapeutics are discussed. Determinants of absorption after SC administration are summarized including compound properties such as charge or molecular weight. Scale-up of animal data to humans is discussed, including the current shortcomings of empirical scaling approaches and the lack of suitable mechanistic approaches.
PubMedId: 22619041
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 14, 2012
Authors: Yash A Gandhi, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship (QSPKR) modeling can be used to predict the biliary clearance and percentage of dose eliminated in bile (PD(b)) in humans before clinical studies. Recently, a QSPKR model based on in-house compounds was derived using simple physicochemical descriptors to predict the PD(b) in rats (Drug Metab Dispos 38:422-430, 2010). Our objective was to evaluate the QSPKR model derived for the prediction of PD(b) for our larger dataset of 164 compounds in the rat and for the 97 compounds in our human dataset (AAPS J 11:511-525, 2009). Re-analysis of the published QSPKR model revealed the model to be statistically insignificant (Drug Metab Dispos 38:422-430, 2010). Thus, a new statistically significant QSPKR model, consisting of one less descriptor than the published model, was derived from the published data. The newly derived model performed as well as the published model in predicting the PD(b) for the training and test sets (Drug Metab Dispos 38:422-430, 2010). In contrast, the new model performed poorly in predicting the PD(b) for our larger rat (r(2) = 0.253) and human dataset (r(2) = 0.013). The poor predictions for our datasets may be due, in part, to the quality and diversity of the data used to derive and test the model. Our reevaluation suggests that hepatobiliary excretion is a process that cannot truly be captured by simple physicochemical descriptors when examining chemically dissimilar compounds. A simple approach involving a limited number of physicochemical predictors may be useful when examining a structurally similar series of compounds.
PubMedId: 22522747
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 40, 2012
Authors: Urvi Aras, Yash A. Gandhi, Patricia A. Masso-Welch, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Biopharmaceutics & Drug Disposition, vol. 34, pp. 98-106, 2012
Authors: Melanie A. Felmlee, Rutwij A. Dave, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 15, pp. 278-287, 2012
Authors: B. L. Morse, N. Vijay, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Molecular Pharmacology, vol. 82, pp. 226-235, 2012
Authors: Fang Wu, Mitalee Tamhane, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 14, pp. 252-261, 2012
Authors: Fang Wu, Suraj G. Bhansali, Wing Cheung Law, Earl J. Bergey, Paras N. Prasad, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 29, pp. 1843-1853, 2012
Authors: Melanie A Felmlee, Marilyn E Morris, Donald E Mager
Abstract: Pharmacodynamic modeling is based on a quantitative integration of pharmacokinetics, pharmacological systems, and (patho-) physiological processes for understanding the intensity and time-course of drug effects on the body. Application of such models to the analysis of meaningful experimental data allows for the quantification and prediction of drug-system interactions for both therapeutic and adverse drug responses. In this chapter, commonly used mechanistic pharmacodynamic models are presented with respect to their important features, operable equations, and signature profiles. In addition, literature examples showcasing the utility of these models to adverse drug events are highlighted. Common model types that are covered include simple direct effects, biophase distribution, indirect effects, signal transduction, and irreversible effects.
PubMedId: 23007443
Journal Article: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), vol. 929, 2012
Authors: Suraj G. Bhansali, Sathy V. Balu-Iyer, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 101, pp. 852-859, 2012
Authors: Guohua An, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: We conducted a pharmacokinetic (PK) study of mitoxantrone (Novantrone), a clinically well-established anticancer agent, in mice and developed a mechanism-based PBPK (physiologically based pharmacokinetic) model to describe its disposition. Mitoxantrone concentrations in plasma and six organs (lung, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, and brain) were determined after a 5mg/kg i.v. dose. We evaluated three different PBPK models in order to characterize our experimental data: model 1 containing Kp values, model 2 incorporating a deep binding compartment, and model 3 incorporating binding of mitoxantrone to DNA and protein. Among the three models, only model 3 with DNA and protein binding captured all the experimental data well. The estimated binding affinity for DNA (K (DNA)) and protein (K (macro)) were 0.0013 and 1.44M, respectively. Predicted plasma and tissue AUC values differed from observed values by <19%, except for heart (60%). Model 3 was further used to simulate plasma mitoxantrone concentrations in humans for a 12-mg/m(2) dose, using human physiological parameters. The simulated results generally agreed with the observed time course of mitoxantrone plasma concentrations in patients after a standard dose of 12mg/m(2). In summary, we reported for the first time a mechanism-based PBPK model of mitoxantrone incorporating macromolecule binding which may have clinical applicability in optimizing clinical therapy. Since mitoxantrone is a substrate of the efflux transporters ABCG2 and ABCB1, the incorporation of efflux transporters may also be necessary to characterize the data obtained in low-dose studies.
PubMedId: 22451016
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 14, 2011
Authors: Marilyn E Morris, Xinning Yang, Yash A Gandhi, Suraj G Bhansali, Lisa J Benincosa
Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prediction performance of various allometric scaling methods in predicting human biliary clearance (CL(b)) from data in rats or multiple animal species and to compare the prediction performance with that of quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship (QSPKR) models. CL(b) data of parent drugs in rats and humans were collected from the literature for 18 compounds. A simple allometric approach was applied to CL(b) or unbound CL(b) using 0.75 or 0.66 as the allometric exponent. For scaling from rat studies alone, the prediction using 0.66 as the exponent was better than that using 0.75, and a better prediction was obtained for unbound CL(b) than CL(b). For a subset of compounds, six multiple-species scaling methods were compared, with the best prediction achieved with the simple unbound CL(b) approach. However, in the absence of protein binding data, the correction with maximum life-span potential (MLP) or 'Rule of exponent' (ROE) method offered the best prediction. Overall, multiple species had better predictability than scaling with the rat alone. Comparison of predicted human CL(b) values using multiple animal species and QSPKR offered similar prediction performance. In conclusion, the results of the present study, although based on limited data, suggested that the prediction for human CL(b) by allometry was greatly improved by the incorporation of protein binding. Human CL(b) prediction using rat data alone was not satisfactory. Additionally, QSPKR provides an alternative approach to allometry for the prediction of human biliary clearance.
PubMedId: 22170504
Journal Article: Biopharmaceutics & drug disposition, vol. 33, 2011
Authors: S. A. Roiko, M. A. Felmlee, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 40, pp. 212-218, 2011
Authors: B. L. Morse, M. A. Felmlee, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 40, pp. 64-69, 2011
Authors: Marilyn E Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Clinical Toxicology, vol. 01, 2011
Authors: Guohua An, Fang Wu, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 28, pp. 1090-1099, 2011
Authors: Melanie A. Felmlee, Wojciech Krzyzanski, Bridget L. Morse, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 13, pp. 240-254, 2011
Authors: Guohua An, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Biopharmaceutics & Drug Disposition, vol. 32, pp. 446-457, 2011
Authors: Lia Tsiklauri, Guohua An, Donna M. Ruszaj, Mary Alaniya, Ether Kemertelidze, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, vol. 55, pp. 109-113, 2011
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Yash A. Gandhi
Book-chapter: Oral Bioavailability, pp. 381-400, 2011
Authors: Guohua An, Jorge Gallegos, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol are major constituents of Ginkgo biloba extract. The ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2), is involved in the transport of quercetin and represents a possible mechanism for the low bioavailability of quercetin. Our objective was to investigate whether kaempferol inhibits Bcrp-mediated quercetin efflux and determine whether it is a substrate for BCRP. The intracellular uptake of kaempferol, with and without specific inhibitors, was determined in Bcrp-expressing cells. The transport of quercetin or kaempferol (10 M) across Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers was investigated in both the apical (A)-to-basolateral (B) and B-to-A directions. Samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Compared with the quercetin alone group, the transport ratio decreased 11.6-fold (from 97.5 to 8.37) in the presence of kaempferol in MDCK/Bcrp1 cells, indicating that kaempferol is a Bcrp inhibitor. The intracellular concentration of kaempferol was significantly increased in the presence of N-(4-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-isoquinolinyl)ethyl]-phenyl)-9,10-dihydro-5-methoxy-9-oxo-4-acridine carboxamide (GF120918), a potent Bcrp inhibitor, suggesting that kaempferol may also be a Bcrp substrate. Moreover, in MDCK/Bcrp1 cells, the P(app, B-A) of kaempferol was much higher (17.7 3.8 10(-6) cm/s) than the P(app, A-B) (0.279 0.037 10(-6) cm/s), with a transport ratio of 63.4. In contrast, the transport ratio of kaempferol was only 0.68 in Bcrp1-negative MDCK/Mock cells. We report for the first time that kaempferol is a Bcrp substrate, and our results indicate that kaempferol inhibits Bcrp-mediated quercetin efflux. Intestinal efflux by Bcrp may represent one possible mechanism for the low bioavailability of kaempferol. The use of flavonoids in combination may increase their bioavailability through transport interactions.
PubMedId: 21139040
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 39, 2010
Authors: Urvi Telang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is a constituent of cruciferous vegetables that has demonstrated cancer preventive activity in a number of cancer models including lung, prostate, and breast cancer. Our objective was to examine the effects of the oral administration of PEITC for 7 days on the hepatic expression of genes important in drug metabolism and toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. The liver is the major site for the metabolism of various xenobiotics and carcinogens, and determining the effects of PEITC on the gene expression of hepatic enzymes may provide insight into mechanisms underlying the cancer preventive activity of PEITC. Using a microarray containing 282 genes, we observed that PEITC significantly up-regulated UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT1A6 and strongly down-regulated nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT). We also confirmed the down-regulation of NNMT by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Other genes that were significantly up-regulated were the drug metabolizing enzyme cyp2b15, the anti-apoptotic gene bcl2l2, and the stress regulators Gadd45b, Dnajb9, Dnajb5 and Hspb1. Our results indicate new targets that may be important in the mechanisms of the anticancer effects of PEITC. Of particular significance was the down-regulation of NNMT which may represent a new target for the treatment of a variety of cancers.
PubMedId: 20626002
Journal Article: Molecular nutrition & food research, vol. 54, 2010
Authors: Melanie A Felmlee, Qi Wang, Dapeng Cui, Samuel A Roiko, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), a drug of abuse, exhibits saturable renal clearance and capacity-limited metabolism. The objectives of this study were to construct a mechanistic toxicokinetic (TK) model describing saturable renal reabsorption and capacity-limited metabolism of GHB and to predict the effects of inhibition of renal reabsorption on GHB TK in the plasma and urine. GHB was administered by iv bolus (200-1,000 mg/kg) to male Sprague-Dawley rats and plasma and urine samples were collected for up to 6 h post-dose. GHB concentrations were determined by LC/MS/MS. GHB plasma concentration and urinary excretion were well-described by a TK model incorporating plasma and kidney compartments, along with two tissue and two ultrafiltrate compartments. The estimate of the Michaelis-Menten constant for renal reabsorption (K (m,R)) was 0.46 mg/ml which is consistent with in vitro estimates of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-mediated uptake of GHB (0.48 mg/ml). Simulation studies assessing inhibition of renal reabsorption of GHB demonstrated increased time-averaged renal clearance and GHB plasma AUC, independent of the inhibition mechanism assessed. Co-administration of GHB (600 mg/kg iv) and L: -lactate (330 mg/kg iv bolus plus 121 mg/kg/h iv infusion), a known inhibitor of MCTs, resulted in a significant decrease in GHB plasma AUC and an increase in time-averaged renal clearance, consistent with the model simulations. These results suggest that inhibition of renal reabsorption of GHB is a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of GHB overdoses. Furthermore, the mechanistic TK model provides a useful in silico tool for the evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies.
PubMedId: 20461486
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 12, 2010
Authors: Guohua An, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of biochanin A on the accumulation and transport of mitoxantrone in breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-expressing normal cells and its impact on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and tissue distribution of mitoxantrone. In accumulation studies, the intracellular level of mitoxantrone was significantly increased in the presence of 2.5 or 25 microM of biochanin A in both murine and human BCRP-expressing Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, with no effect in corresponding MDCK/Mock cells. In bi-directional transport studies, the P(app,B-A) value of mitoxantrone with biochanin A co-treatment was much lower (6.66+/-0.84x10(-7) cm/s) than that in the absence of biochanin A (21.4+/-4.14x10(-7) cm/s), indicating inhibition of Bcrp1-mediated efflux. To evaluate whether our in vitro results might translate into an in vivo interaction, mitoxantrone PK and tissue distribution, with and without co-administration of biochanin A, was investigated. In contrast to our in vitro results, biochanin A (10 mg/kg, i.v.) had no impact on the concentration of mitoxantrone in plasma and most tissues collected (brain, heart, liver and lung). Surprisingly, the concentrations of mitoxantrone in spleen and kidney were even decreased when biochanin A was co-administered. Interestingly, it was found that the intracellular fluorescence of mitoxantrone was decreased 31.9% when co-incubated with 10 microM biochanin A in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expressing MCF-7/ADR cells, indicating potential P-gp stimulation. The species difference of the inhibitory effect of biochanin A on BCRP, the extensive metabolism of biochanin A, as well as the stimulation effect of biochanin A on P-gp, may contribute to this in vitro-in vivo disconnect.
PubMedId: 20535833
Journal Article: Biopharmaceutics & drug disposition, vol. 31, 2010
Authors: Melanie A Felmlee, Samuel A Roiko, Bridget L Morse, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous neurotransmitter that is abused because of its sedative/hypnotic and euphoric effects. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the concentration-effect relationships of GHB in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), brain (whole and discrete brain regions), and brain frontal cortex extracellular fluid. This information is crucial for future studies to evaluate effects of therapeutic interventions on the toxicodynamics of GHB. GHB (200-1000 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to rats, and plasma and frontal cortex microdialysate samples were collected for up to 6 h after the dose, or plasma, CSF, and brain (whole, frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus) concentrations were determined at the offset of its sedative/hypnotic effect [return to righting reflex (RRR)]. GHB-induced changes in the brain neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate were also determined. GHB, GABA, and glutamate concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. GHB-induced sleep time significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner (20-fold increase from 200 to 1000 mg/kg). GHB concentrations in plasma (300-400 microg/ml), whole brain (70 microg/g), discrete brain regions (80-100 microg/g), and brain microdialysate (29-39 microg/ml) correlated with RRR. In contrast, CSF GHB and GABA and glutamate concentrations in discrete brain regions exhibited no relationship with RRR. Our results suggest that GHB-induced sedative/hypnotic effects are mediated directly by GHB and that at high GHB doses, GABA formation from GHB may not contribute to the observed sedative/hypnotic effect. These results support the use of a clinical GHB detoxification strategy aimed at decreasing plasma and brain GHB concentrations after GHB overdoses.
PubMedId: 20215411
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 333, 2010
Authors: Xinning Yang, Yash A. Gandhi, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 40, pp. 33-37, 2010
Authors: Guohua An, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 27, pp. 1296-1308, 2010
Authors: Sharifah S. Syed Alwi, Breeze E. Cavell, Urvi Telang, Marilyn E. Morris, Barbara M. Parry, Graham Packham
Journal-article: British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 104, pp. 1288-1296, 2010
Authors: Guohua An, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, vol. 51, pp. 750-753, 2010
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Daniel A Brazeau, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a component in cruciferous vegetables, can block chemical carcinogenesis in animal models. Our objective was to determine the effect of treatment with PEITC on gene expression changes in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in order to evaluate potential mechanisms involved in its chemopreventive effects. MCF-7 cells were treated for 48 hours with either PEITC (3M) or the vehicle. Total RNA was extracted from cell membrane preparations, and labeled cDNA's representing the mRNA pool were reverse-transcribed directly from total RNA isolated for use in the microarray hybridizations. Two specific human GE Array Kits (Superarray Inc.) that both contain 23 marker genes, related to signal transduction pathways or cancer/tumor suppression, plus 2 housekeeping genes (-actin and GAPDH), were utilized. Arrays from treated and control cells (n = 4 per group) were evaluated using a Student's t-test. Gene expression was significantly induced for tumor protein p53 (p53), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (p57 Kip2), breast cancer Type 2 early onset (BRCA2), cAMP responsive element binding protein 2 (ATF-2), interleukin 2 (IL-2), heat shock 27 KD protein (hsp27), and CYP19 (aromatase). Induction of p57 Kip2, p53, BRCA2, IL-2, and ATF-2 would be expected to decrease cellular proliferation and increase tumor suppression and/or apoptosis. PEITC treatment produced significant alterations in some genes involved in tumor suppression and cellular proliferation/apoptosis that may be important in explaining the chemopreventive effects of PEITC.
PubMedId: 20953429
Journal Article: Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, vol. 2011, 2009
Authors: Xinning Yang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The objective of this investigation was to compare the observed biliary clearance (CL(b)) and % of dose excreted in the bile (PD(b)) of mitoxantrone with the predicted values obtained from quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship (QSPKR) models. Blood and bile samples were collected from bile duct cannulated rats after an intravenous bolus dose of 0.5 or 2 mg/kg mitoxantrone, and the concentrations were measured by HPLC. Mitoxantrone plasma concentrations exhibited a tri-exponential profile with systemic clearance of 118 +/- 6.8 mL/min/kg. After dosing, 6.08 +/- 2.32% and 5.69 +/- 0.59% of the dose were excreted into bile in unchanged form after a 3-h collection. CL(b) was 7.20 +/- 4.54 and 7.46 +/- 0.62 mL/min/kg after the two doses. With the co-administration of 10 mg/kg GF-120918, a P-glycoprotein and BCRP inhibitor, PD(b) was reduced to 0.69 +/- 0.07%, suggesting that BCRP or P-glycoprotein may play an important role in the biliary elimination of mitoxantrone. Using QSPKR models developed for the biliary excretion of cations/neutral compounds in rats, CL(b) and PD(b) of mitoxantrone were predicted as 5.18 mL/min/kg and 7.21%, respectively, suggesting that the models could be used to predict the biliary excretion of mitoxantrone.
PubMedId: 20013854
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 99, 2009
Authors: Wing Ki Lam, Melanie A Felmlee, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The objectives of this study were to determine mRNA expression of monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) and to evaluate intestinal transport of the MCT substrates gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and d-lactate in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The presence of mRNA for MCT1, 2, 3, and 4 was observed in Caco-2 cells. The uptake of both GHB and d-lactate in Caco-2 cells was demonstrated to be pH- and concentration-dependent and sodium-independent. The uptake of GHB and d-lactate was best described by a Michaelis-Menten equation with passive diffusion (GHB: K(m) = 17.6 +/- 10.5 mM, V(max) = 17.3 +/- 11.7 nmol/min/mg, and P = 0.38 +/- 0.15 microl/min/mg; and d-lactate: K(m) = 6.0 +/- 2.9 mM, V(max) = 35.0 +/- 18.4 nmol/min/mg, and P = 1.3 +/- 0.6 microl/min/mg). The uptake of GHB and d-lactate was significantly decreased by the known MCT inhibitor alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and the MCT substrates GHB and d-lactate but not by the organic cation tetraethylammonium chloride. Directional flux studies with both GHB and d-lactate suggested the involvement of carrier-mediated transport with the permeability in the apical to basolateral direction higher than that in the basolateral to apical direction. These findings confirm the presence of MCT1-4 in Caco-2 cells and demonstrate GHB and d-lactate transport characteristics consistent with proton-dependent MCT-mediated transport.
PubMedId: 19952290
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 38, 2009
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Kazuko Sagawa, Robert D Arnold, Elaine Tseng, Xiaodong Wang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo interactions between flavonoids and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates. The inhibitory effects of flavonoids on P-gp were determined by accumulation studies in P-gp-overexpressing MCF-7/ADR cells using daunomycin (DNM) as a model substrate. Morin, phloretin, biochanin A, chalcone, and silymarin significantly increased DNM accumulation by greater than 2.5-fold, suggesting they are P-gp inhibitors. To explore potential in vivo interactions of flavonoids with P-gp, the effect of biochanin A on the pharmacokinetics of the P-gp substrates doxorubicin, cyclosporine A, and paclitaxel was investigated. In contrast to the in vitro results, intraperitoneal or oral administration of biochanin A did not significantly change the pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin and cyclosporine A. Moderate interaction was observed between biochanin A and paclitaxel, resulting in lower AUC values after both i.v. and oral administration of paclitaxel. The disconnect between the in vitro and in vivo data suggests that P-gp interactions mediated by biochanin A may be limited due to its poor bioavailability and rapid clearance. It is also possible that other transporters or metabolizing enzymes are more important in the in vivo disposition of doxorubicin, cyclosporine A, and paclitaxel than P-gp.
PubMedId: 19499569
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 99, 2009
Authors: Urvi Telang, Yan Ji, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Isothiocyanates, a class of anti-cancer agents, are derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage and watercress, and have demonstrated chemopreventive activity in a number of cancer models and epidemiologic studies. Due to public interest in cancer prevention and alternative therapies in cancer, the consumption of herbal supplements and vegetables containing these compounds is widespread and increasing. Isothiocyanates interact with ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP, and may influence the pharmacokinetics of substrates of these transporters. This review discusses the pharmacokinetic properties of isothiocyanates, their interactions with ABC transporters, and presents some data describing the potential for isothiocyanate-mediated diet-drug interactions.
PubMedId: 19623673
Journal Article: Biopharmaceutics & drug disposition, vol. 30, 2009
Authors: Yash A Gandhi, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), the newest ABC transporter, was discovered independently by three groups in the late 1990s. ABCG2 is widely distributed in the body with expression in the brain, intestine, and liver, among others. ABCG2 plays an important role by effluxing drugs at the blood-brain, blood-testis, and maternal-fetal barriers and in the efflux of xenobiotics at the small intestine and kidney proximal tubule brush border and liver canalicular membranes. ABCG2 transports a wide variety of substrates including HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, antibiotics, and many anticancer agents and is one contributor to multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models and structure-activity relationships (SARs) are often employed to predict ABCG2 substrates and inhibitors prior to in vitro and in vivo studies. QSAR models correlate in vivo biological activity to physicochemical properties of compounds while SARs attempt to explain chemical moieties or structural features that contribute to or are detrimental to the biological activity. Most ABCG2 datasets available for in silico modeling are comprised of congeneric series of compounds; the results from one series usually cannot be applied to another series of compounds. This review will focus on in silico models in the literature used for the prediction of ABCG2 substrates and inhibitors.
PubMedId: 19629710
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 11, 2009
Authors: Xinning Yang, Yash A Gandhi, David B Duignan, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The aims were (1) to evaluate the molecular weight (MW) dependence of biliary excretion and (2) to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPKR) to predict biliary clearance (CL(b)) and percentage of administered dose excreted in bile as parent drug (PD(b)) in rats and humans. CL(b) and PD(b) data were collected from the literature for rats and humans. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was utilized to determine whether a MW threshold exists for PD(b). Stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to derive QSPKR models. The predictive performance of the models was evaluated by internal validation using the leave-one-out method and external test groups. A MW threshold of 400 Da was determined for PD(b) for anions in rats, while 475 Da was the cutoff for anions in humans. MW thresholds were not present for cations or cations/neutral compounds in either rats or humans. The QSPKR model for human CL(b) showed a significant correlation (R (2) = 0.819) with good prediction performance (Q (2) = 0.722). The model was further assessed using a test group, yielding a geometric mean fold-error of 2.68. QSPKR models with significant correlation and good predictability were also developed for CL(b) in rats and PD(b) data for anions or cation/neutral compounds in rats and humans. Both CL(b) and PD(b) data were further evaluated for subsets of MRP2 or P-glycoprotein substrates, and significant relationships were derived. QSPKR models were successfully developed for biliary excretion of non-congeneric compounds in rats and humans, providing a quantitative prediction of biliary clearance of compounds.
PubMedId: 19593675
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 11, 2009
Authors: Dapeng Cui, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), a drug of abuse, is a substrate of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (SMCT1; SLC5A8) is expressed in kidney, thyroid gland, neurons, and intestinal tract and exhibits substrate specificity similar to that of the proton-dependent MCT (SLC16A) family. The role of SMCT1 in GHB disposition has not been determined. In this study we characterized the driving force, transport kinetics, and inhibitors of GHB uptake, as well as expression of SMCT and MCT isoforms, in rat thyroid follicular (FRTL-5) cells. GHB, as well as the monocarboxylates butyrate and d-lactate, exhibited sodium-dependent uptake at pH 7.4, which could be described with a simple Michaelis-Menten equation plus a diffusional component [K(m) 0.68 +/- 0.30 mM, V(max) 3.50 +/- 1.58 nmol . mg(-1) . min(-1), and diffusional clearance (P) 0.25 +/- 0.08 microl . mg(-1) . min(-1)]. In the absence of sodium, GHB uptake was significantly increased at lower pH, suggesting proton-gradient dependent transport. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western analyses demonstrated the expression of SMCT1, MCT1, and MCT2 in FRTL-5 cells, supporting the activity results. Sodium-dependent GHB uptake in FRTL-5 cells was inhibited by MCT substrates (d-lactate, l-lactate, pyruvate, and butyrate), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen), and probenecid. IC(50) values for l-lactate, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and probenecid were 101, 31.6, 64.4, and 380 muM, respectively. All four inhibitors also significantly inhibited GHB uptake in rat MCT1 gene-transfected MDA/MB231 cells, suggesting they are not specific for SMCT1. Luteolin and alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnimate represent specific proton-dependent MCT inhibitors. Our findings indicate that GHB is a substrate for both sodium- and proton-dependent MCTs and identified specific inhibitors of MCTs.
PubMedId: 19389857
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 37, 2009
Authors: Y.-Z. Pan, M. E. Morris, A.-M. Yu
Journal-article: Molecular Pharmacology, vol. 75, pp. 1374-1379, 2009
Authors: Guohua An, Marilyn E. Morris
Book-chapter: Enzyme- and Transporter-Based Drug-Drug Interactions, pp. 555-584, 2009
Authors: Urvi Telang, Daniel A. Brazeau, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 234, pp. 287-295, 2009
Authors: Xiaodong Wang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The flavonoid 7,8-benzoflavone was recently identified as one of the most potent inhibitors of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP); however, little is known of the in vivo disposition of 7,8-benzoflavone. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of 7,8-benzoflavone in rats. Three intravenous (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg) and three oral (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg) doses were administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted by WinNonlin and ADAPT II. The dose-normalized plasma concentration versus time curves did not superimpose with each other, indicating the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of 7,8-benzoflavone. 7,8-benzoflavone exhibited a large volume of distribution (V(ss) approximately 1.5 L/kg) and rapid oral absorption (t(max) < 30 min). The bioavailability of 7,8-benzoflavone was low (0.61-13.2%) and dose-dependent. A pharmacokinetic model with dose-dependent bioavailability, linear absorption and nonlinear elimination best described the pharmacokinetic profiles of 7,8-benzoflavone. Using a 50 mg/kg oral dose of 7,8-benzoflavone, we could significantly increase the AUC for the BCRP substrate nitrofurantoin, demonstrating the potential for BCRP-mediated drug interactions.
PubMedId: 18257033
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 97, 2008
Authors: Q. Wang, X. Wang, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 36, pp. 2244-2251, 2008
Authors: K. Sandy Pang, Marilyn E. Morris, Huadong Sun
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, vol. 60, pp. 1247-1275, 2008
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Melanie A. Felmlee
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 10, pp. 311-321, 2008
Authors: Young J. Moon, Liang Wang, Robert DiCenzo, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Biopharmaceutics & Drug Disposition, vol. 29, pp. 205-217, 2008
Authors: Xiaodong Wang, Qi Wang, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The AAPS Journal, vol. 10, pp. 47-55, 2008
Authors: Hwa Jeong Lee, Kazuko Sagawa, Wei Shi, Heini Murer, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 225, pp. 49-57, 2008
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Beom Soo Shin, Guohua An, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Our objective was to determine the effect of the flavonoid biochanin A (BCA), administered alone or in combination with the flavonoids quercetin and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), on the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells in a murine xenograft animal model. MCF-7 tumors were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, BCA at 2 doses (5 or 15 mg/kg), quercetin and EGCG (5 mg/kg each), or BCA combined with quercetin and EGCG (5 mg/kg each). The flavonoids were injected once daily intraperitoneally, with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cell inoculation. Treatment with 15 mg/kg of BCA or the mixture of the 3 flavonoids resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 15 mg/kg BCA was significantly smaller than in the control group. Although quercetin/EGCG administration did not affect tumor size, treatment with the mixture of the 3 flavonoids at doses of 5 mg/kg produced similar effects as seen with 15 mg/kg BCA. Our findings indicate that BCA inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model; BCA may represent a breast cancer preventive agent, either administered alone or in combination with other flavonoids.
PubMedId: 18454305
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 25, 2007
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Shuzhong Zhang, Daniel A Brazeau, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Biochanin A (BCA), a phytoestrogen present in plant food and herbal products, has been reported to have cancer-preventive effects that may be mediated, in part, through effects on carcinogen metabolism. Our objective was to examine the effect of BCA on gene expression for drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in human hepatocytes. Cells were exposed to 20 muM of BCA for 5 days. Gene expression was assessed by a 96-gene human drug metabolism enzyme microarray. There were seven genes that were significantly up-regulated, namely cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2F1, multidrug resistance gene (MDR1), thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXAS1), and SULT1A2 (sulfotransferase). Up-regulation of MDR1, which encodes for P-glycoprotein, was confirmed using real-time RT-PCR and Western analysis in hepatocytes as well as in human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (LS-180) and the induction was dose-dependent. BCA treatment up-regulated genes mainly in the CYP2 family. This induction can influence the metabolism of xenobiotics, producing effects of pharmacological and toxicological importance.
PubMedId: 17340576
Journal Article: Molecular nutrition & food research, vol. 51, 2007
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Molecular Pharmaceutics, vol. 4, pp. 865-872, 2007
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Shuzhong Zhang, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Acta Haematologica, vol. 118, pp. 169-175, 2007
Authors: Q. Wang, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 35, pp. 1393-1399, 2007
Authors: Qi Wang, Ye Lu, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 24, pp. 1067-1078, 2007
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Daniel A. Brazeau, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 57, pp. 48-58, 2007
Authors: Qi Wang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of flavonoids on the in vitro monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1)-mediated transport and in vivo disposition of the drug of abuse, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). The uptake of GHB in rat MCT1 gene-transfected MDA-MB231 cells was significantly decreased in the presence of the flavonoids apigenin, biochanin A, chrysin, diosemin, fisetin, genistein, hesperitin, kaempferol, luteolin, morin, narigenin, phloretin, and quercetin, but was not affected by the flavonoid glycosides phloridzin and rutin. The IC(50) values for luteolin, morin, and phloretin were 0.41 +/- 0.14, 6.41 +/- 2.01, and 2.57 +/- 0.48 microM, with the inhibition mechanism for luteolin being competitive. [(3)H]Kaempferol and [(3)H]biochanin A did not exhibit MCT1-mediated uptake, suggesting that these flavonoids are not substrates for MCT1. The combination of luteolin and phloretin inhibited the uptake of GHB in a synergistic manner; however, the combination of luteolin and morin was antagonistic. GHB 1000 mg/kg was administered to rats by i.v. bolus, with or without the concomitant administration of luteolin 10 mg/kg i.v. After luteolin treatment, the renal and total clearances of GHB were significantly increased, probably because of inhibition of the MCT1-mediated renal reabsorption of GHB, and the sleep time significantly decreased (121 +/- 5 min versus 165 +/- 10 min) compared with control rats. Overall, the results of this study indicate that flavonoids from food or herbal products may significantly alter the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of MCT substrates.
PubMedId: 17108059
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 35, 2006
Authors: Xiaodong Wang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter, important in drug disposition and in the development of multidrug resistance in cancer. Flavonoids, a large class of natural compounds widely present in the diet and herbal products, have been shown in vitro to be BCRP inhibitors. The flavonoid chrysin is a potent inhibitor of BCRP, inhibiting the efflux of mitoxantrone with an IC(50) of 0.39 microM in BCRP-overexpressing human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic interactions between chrysin and nitrofurantoin (a specific BCRP substrate) in rats. In Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing human BCRP or murine Bcrp1, the polarized transport of nitrofurantoin was effectively inhibited by chrysin at concentrations of 20 and 100 microM. Compared with the vehicle-treated group, p.o. coadministration of chrysin (200 mg/kg) significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) and C(max) of nitrofurantoin (10 mg/kg) by 1.76- (p < 0.01) and 1.72-fold (p < 0.05), respectively. When nitrofurantoin (2 mg/kg) was given i.v., administration of chrysin (50 mg/kg i.p.) significantly increased the AUC of nitrofurantoin (123 +/- 34.0 versus 91.5 +/- 18.0 microg/ml x min in controls, p < 0.05). Moreover, the cumulative hepatobiliary excretion of nitrofurantoin (1.5 mg/kg i.v.) was significantly decreased by approximately 75% at the end of 120 min after the coadministration of chrysin (50 mg/kg i.p.). Taken together, these results indicate that the flavonoid chrysin significantly inhibits nitrofurantoin transport mediated by human BCRP and murine Bcrp1. Bcrp1 inhibition by chrysin is likely one potential mechanism for the observed chrysin-nitrofurantoin pharmacokinetic interactions in rats.
PubMedId: 17093006
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 35, 2006
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Kazuko Sagawa, Kosea Frederick, Shuzhong Zhang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Biochanin A (BCA) is a dietary isoflavone present in legumes, most notably red clover, and in many herbal dietary supplements. BCA has been reported to have chemopreventive properties and is metabolized to the isoflavone genistein (GEN), BCA conjugates, and GEN conjugates. The metabolites may contribute to the chemopreventive effects of BCA. The absorption, metabolism, and disposition of BCA have not been determined in rats. Our objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of BCA in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered BCA by intravenous injection (1 and 5 mg/kg), by intraperitoneal injection (5 and 50 mg/kg), and orally (5 and 50 mg/kg). Plasma and bile samples were enzymatically hydrolyzed in vitro to determine conjugate concentrations for BCA and GEN. Equilibrium dialysis was used to determine protein binding. The BCA and GEN concentrations in plasma, urine, and bile were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters of BCA were analyzed by noncompartmental analysis. Significant levels of BCA conjugates and GEN conjugates were detected in plasma and bile. Both BCA and GEN were found to have a high clearance and a large apparent volume of distribution; the bioavailability of both was poor (<4%). Reentry peaks were evident after oral administration of both BCA and GEN, suggesting enterohepatic cycling. The free fraction of BCA in rat plasma was 1.5%. A 2-compartment model that included both linear and nonlinear clearance terms and enterohepatic recirculation best described the plasma data. This represents the first evaluation of the dose-dependent pharmacokinetics and metabolism of BCA in rats.
PubMedId: 17025260
Journal Article: The AAPS journal, vol. 8, 2006
Authors: Marilyn E Morris, Shuzhong Zhang
Abstract: Flavonoids are present in fruits, vegetables and beverages derived from plants (tea, red wine), and in many dietary supplements or herbal remedies including Ginkgo Biloba, Soy Isoflavones, and Milk Thistle. Flavonoids have been described as health-promoting, disease-preventing dietary supplements, and a high intake of flavonoids has been associated with a reduced risk of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis and other age-related degenerative diseases. Due to an increased public interest in alternative medicine and disease prevention, the use of herbal preparations containing high doses of flavonoids for health maintenance has become very popular, raising the potential for interactions with conventional drug therapies. This review will summarize the current literature regarding the interactions of flavonoids with ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, mainly P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP and discuss the potential consequences for flavonoid-drug transport interactions.
PubMedId: 16455109
Journal Article: Life sciences, vol. 78, 2005
Authors: Xiao-fei Zhou, Qi Wang, Robert A Coburn, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: A simple and reliable reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for the determination of DHP-014, a niguldipine analogue with potent P-glycoprotein inhibitory and negligible calcium channel blocking properties, in rat plasma. DHP-014 and niguldipine hydrochloride (the internal standard) were extracted from rat plasma by liquid extraction using hexane. DHP-014 was then separated by HPLC on a C18 column and quantified by ultraviolet detection at 238 nm. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-aqueous 5 mM phosphate buffer (65:35, v/v) containing 0.4% (v/v) triethylamine adjusted to pH 7.0. The mean extraction efficiency of DHP-014 was 109.0 +/- 12.9, 97.7 +/- 8.0 and 102.9 +/- 7.5% for DHP-014 concentrations of 10, 50 and 100 nM, respectively (n = 5). The method was linear over the concentration range 2.5-200 nM with a regression coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection of DHP-014 in rat plasma was 1.0 nM. The intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation for DHP-014 in rat plasma were 4.7-7.9 and 6.9-9.9%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day accuracy was 98.2-99.5 and 97.9-103%, respectively. The bioanalytical technique was used to determine DHP-014 in plasma samples in a pharmacokinetic study of DHP-014 administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats.
PubMedId: 15954160
Journal Article: Biomedical chromatography : BMC, vol. 20, 2005
Authors: Ke Hu, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Many naturally occurring and synthetic isothiocyanates can inhibit chemical carcinogenesis in animal models. Recently, we found that alpha-naphthyl isothiocyanate (1-NITC) inhibited P-glycoprotein- and multidrug resistance associated protein 1-mediated efflux, indicating the potential application of 1-NITC as a chemosensitizing agent for cancer chemotherapy. The objective of this study was to explore the pharmacokinetic characteristics of 1-NITC in rats. A single dose of 10, 25, 50, or 75 mg/kg of 1-NITC was administered intravenously or orally to female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 4 for each group). Dose-normalized concentration-time profiles were not superimposable following intravenous or oral dosing, indicating that the disposition of 1-NITC in rats was nonlinear. As doses increased from 10 to 75 mg/kg following iv administration, the total clearance decreased from 2.2 +/- 0.9 to 0.8 +/- 0.3 L/h/kg; oral availability averaged 0.46 for oral doses of 10-75 mg/kg. A nonlinear two-compartment open model with capacity-limited absorption and capacity-limited elimination from the central compartment best fit the data, based on goodness-of-fit criteria. The mechanism underlying the nonlinear elimination of 1-NITC in rats is most likely due to the capacity-limited metabolism of 1-NITC. This study represents the first report of the pharmacokinetics of 1-NITC.
PubMedId: 16200545
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 94, 2005
Authors: Xiao-fei Zhou, Joan Macdiarmid, Robert A Coburn, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: (+/-)3-(3-(4,4-diphenylpiperidin-1-yl)propyl) 5-methyl 4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate ((+/-)-DHP-014), is a new 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridine that can reverse multidrug resistance mediated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins, P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and breast cancer resistance protein; it exhibits negligible calcium channel blocking activity. The objective of this work was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of this new compound in rats. Three intravenous (1, 2 and 5 mg/kg) and two oral (25 and 50 mg/kg) doses were administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats. A two-compartment model with nonlinear elimination best characterized the pharmacokinetic profiles after intravenous and oral administration in rats. The terminal half-life of (+/-)-DHP-014 increased and the systemic clearance significantly decreased at higher doses, indicating nonlinear elimination. The dose-dependent clearance is likely due to saturation of metabolism. The apparent volume of distribution of (+/-)-DHP-014 was 2.0 L/kg in rats and was unchanged with increasing intravenous doses of (+/-)-DHP-014. The estimated oral bioavailability of (+/-)-DHP-014 was 8.2%. The poor bioavailability is likely due to the poor solubility of the compound, as well as to substantial first-pass elimination.
PubMedId: 15991253
Journal Article: Biopharmaceutics & drug disposition, vol. 26, 2005
Authors: Yan Ji, Yuhsin Kuo, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is a dietary component present in cruciferous vegetables and reported to have chemopreventive properties. Previous reports of PEITC pharmacokinetics have measured total ITC (PEITC and its metabolites) in plasma. Our objective was to examine the dose-dependent pharmacokinetics and oral bioavailability of unchanged PEITC, as well as its pH- and temperature-dependent stability and its serum protein binding. Stability was studied at different pH values at room temperature and 4 degrees C. Protein binding was determined by equilibrium dialysis. For the pharmacokinetics study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with PEITC at doses of 2, 10, 100, or 400 micromol/kg intravenously or 10 or 100 micromol/kg orally. Plasma samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted by WinNonlin and ADAPT II. Phenethyl isothiocyanate was stable in aqueous buffers at pH 7.4 with half-lives of 56.1 and 108 h at room temperature and 4 degrees C, respectively. The free fraction of PEITC in rat serum was 0.019. The clearance (Cl) at a low dose of PEITC (2 micromol/kg) was 0.70 +/- 0.17 L h(-1) kg(-1) with an apparent volume of distribution (Vss) of 1.94 +/- 0.42 L/kg. At higher doses, Cl tended to decrease, whereas Vss increased. Oral bioavailability of PEITC was 115 and 93% at doses of 10 and 100 micromol/kg, respectively. A three-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination and distribution was found to best characterize the plasma concentration profiles. Phenethyl isothiocyanate is stable in biological samples, with increased stability under refrigerated conditions. It has high oral bioavailability, low clearance, and high protein binding in rats; nonlinear elimination and distribution occur following the administration of high doses. This investigation represents the first report of the pharmacokinetics of dietary PEITC.
PubMedId: 16180123
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 22, 2005
Authors: Yan Ji, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are non-nutrient constituents abundant in cruciferous vegetables and are effective in blocking carcinogenesis in a variety of tissues. ITCs permeate into cells rapidly and accumulate in cells primarily as glutathione (GSH) conjugates. We have demonstrated recently that certain ITCs are inhibitors of ABCG2 (breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP), an ATP-binding cassette transporter that plays an important role in drug absorption and disposition as well as in the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of interactions between ITCs and BCRP and elucidate the transport of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) by BCRP. Inside-out membrane vesicles were prepared from human breast cancer BCRP-overexpressing MCF-7/MX100 and the parental MCF-7/sensitive cells. The ATPase study using 100 muM ITCs showed that ITCs are potential inhibitors of BCRP ATPase activity. The transport of (14)C-PEITC into BCRP-overexpressing MCF-7/MX100 cell vesicles was ATP-dependent and inhibited by fumitremorgin C (FTC), a specific inhibitor of BCRP, indicating that PEITC is a substrate for BCRP. In the control MCF-7/sensitive cell vesicles, no ATP-dependent and FTC-inhibited transport of (14)C-PEITC was observed. Taken together, the results of this investigation provided evidence that ITCs are potential inhibitors of BCRP ATPase and PEITC, in its unchanged form, is transported by BCRP. These data may be important in elucidating the interaction of ITCs and cellular transporters and in understanding the potential food-drug interaction.
PubMedId: 16196494
Journal Article: Molecular pharmaceutics, vol. 2, 2005
Authors: Yan Ji, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: We demonstrated recently that phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a potent anticarcinogen present in cruciferous vegetables, inhibited P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and that MRP1 can transport PEITC and/or its metabolites. In this study, we have examined whether PEITC is transported by P-gp and MRP2, two transporters with high expression in human intestine, liver and kidney. Using (14)C-PEITC, no significant difference was observed for the intracellular accumulation of PEITC in human breast cancer MCF-7/sensitive (control) and MCF-7/ADR (P-gp overexpressing) cells at PEITC concentrations of 1, 10 and 50 microM. Moreover, the presence of verapamil or PSC833, two P-gp inhibitors, had no significant effect on the intracellular accumulation of PEITC in P-gp overexpressing MCF-7/ADR and MDA435/LCC6MDR1 cells, indicating that PEITC may not be a substrate for P-gp. In contrast, (14)C-PEITC intracellular accumulation in the kidney epithelial MDCK II/MRP2 cells (transfected with human MRP2) was significantly lower than in the wild-type MDCK II/wt cells at PEITC concentrations of 1, 5, 10 and 50 microM. The presence of MK571, an MRP inhibitor, significantly enhanced (14)C-PEITC accumulation in MDCK II/MRP2 but not MDCK II/wt cells. Furthermore, depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) following treatment with buthionine sulphoximine, an inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis, significantly increased (14)C-PEITC intracellular accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Transcellular transport studies also demonstrated that depletion of intracellular GSH reduced the mean ratio of basal-to-apical transport to apical-to-basal transport of PEITC in MDCK II/MRP2, but not MDCK II/wt cell monolayers. These results indicate that GSH plays an important role in the MRP2-mediated transport of PEITC. The findings provide new information concerning the interactions between PEITC and membrane transporters and suggest the possibility of PEITC interactions with xenobiotics that are MRP2 substrates.
PubMedId: 16002050
Journal Article: Biochemical pharmacology, vol. 70, 2005
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Xinning Yang, Robert A Coburn, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a newly identified ABC transporter, which plays an important role in drug disposition and represents an additional mechanism for the development of MDR. Flavonoids, a major class of natural compounds widely present in foods and herbal products, have been shown to be BCRP inhibitors. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the SAR and derive a QSAR model for flavonoid-BCRP interaction. The EC(50) values for increasing mitoxantrone accumulation in MCF-7 MX100 cells for 25 flavonoids, from five flavonoid subclasses, were determined in this study or obtained from our previous publication [Zhang S, Yang X, Morris ME. Combined effects of multiple flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2)-mediated transport. Pharm Res 2004;21(7):1263-73], and ranged from 0.07+/-0.02 microM to 183+/-21.7 microM. We found that the presence of a 2,3-double bond in ring C, ring B attached at position 2, hydroxylation at position 5, lack of hydroxylation at position 3 and hydrophobic substitution at positions 6, 7, 8 or 4', are important structural properties important for potent flavonoid-BCRP interaction. These structural requirements are similar but not identical to those for potent flavonoid-NBD2 (P-glycoprotein) interaction, indicating that inhibition of BCRP by flavonoids may involve, in part, the binding of flavonoids with the NBD of BCRP. In addition, a QSAR model consisting three structural descriptors was constructed, and both internally and externally validated, suggesting the model could be used to quantitatively predict BCRP inhibition activity of flavonoids. These findings should be useful for predicting BCRP inhibition activity of other untested flavonoids and for guiding the synthesis of potent BCRP inhibitors for potential clinical application.
PubMedId: 15979586
Journal Article: Biochemical pharmacology, vol. 70, 2005
Authors: Liang Wang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: A sensitive and specific method was developed and validated for the quantitation of quercetin in human plasma and urine. The application of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a TurboIonspray (TIS) interface in negative mode under multiple reactions monitoring was investigated. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C12 column using a mobile phase of acetonitrile/water with 0.2% formic acid (pH 2.4) (40/60, v/v). The detection limit was 100 pg/ml and the lower limit of quantification was 500 pg/ml for plasma samples; the detection limit was 500 pg/ml and the lower limit of quantification was 1 ng/ml for urine samples. The calibration curve was linear from 1 to 800 ng/ml for plasma samples and was linear from 1 to 200 and 50 to 2000 ng/ml for urine samples. All the intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation were less than 11% and intra- and inter-day accuracies were within +/-15% of the known concentrations. This represents a LC/MS/MS assay with the sensitivity and specificity necessary to determine quercetin in human plasma and urine. This assay was used to determine both parent quercetin and the quercetin after enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase/sulfatase in human plasma and urine samples following the ingestion of quercetin 500 mg capsules.
PubMedId: 15925552
Journal Article: Journal of chromatography. B, Analytical technologies in the biomedical and life sciences, vol. 821, 2005
Authors: Marilyn E Morris, Ke Hu, Qi Wang
Abstract: Intoxication with gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is associated with coma, seizure, and death; treatment of overdoses is symptomatic. The objectives of this investigation were to characterize the renal clearance and total clearance of GHB in rats and to evaluate potential strategies for increasing the elimination of GHB after drug overdoses. GHB was administered by i.v. infusion at low (108 mg/h/kg), medium (128 mg/h/kg), or high (208 mg/h/kg) doses. Crossover studies were performed under steady-state conditions using the medium dose in the absence or presence of l-lactate, pyruvate, d-mannitol, sodium bicarbonate, or normal saline. GHB in plasma and urine samples was assayed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Infusion of the low, medium, and high doses of GHB produced steady-state plasma concentrations of 0.22 +/- 0.04, 0.43 +/- 0.05, and 0.68 +/- 0.11 mg/ml. The renal clearance of the medium (51.8 +/- 13.0 ml/h/kg) and high (97.1 +/- 43.1 ml/h/kg) doses was significantly higher than that of the low dose (14.9 +/- 5.1 ml/h/kg), whereas the total clearance values were significantly lower than that of the low dose. The renal clearance was significantly increased by the concomitant administration of l-lactate, pyruvate, d-mannitol, or sodium bicarbonate with GHB but was not altered by normal saline. The total and metabolic clearance values were significantly increased by all treatments except normal saline. Overall, our results indicated that the renal clearance of GHB is dose-dependent, involving capacity-limited reabsorption. Monocarboxylate transport inhibitors, osmotic diuresis using d-mannitol, or the administration of sodium bicarbonate can increase the renal and total clearances of GHB. The approaches used in this investigation may offer potential detoxification strategies for the treatment of GHB overdoses.
PubMedId: 15722403
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 313, 2005
Authors: Young Jin Moon, Xiaodong Wang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Flavonoids are present in fruits, vegetables and beverages derived from plants (tea, red wine), and in many dietary supplements or herbal remedies including Ginkgo Biloba, Soy Isoflavones, and Milk Thistle. Flavonoids have been described as health-promoting, disease-preventing dietary supplements, and have activity as cancer preventive agents. Additionally, they are extremely safe and associated with low toxicity, making them excellent candidates for chemopreventive agents. The cancer protective effects of flavonoids have been attributed to a wide variety of mechanisms, including modulating enzyme activities resulting in the decreased carcinogenicity of xenobiotics. This review focuses on the flavonoid effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes involved in the activation of procarcinogens and phase II enzymes, largely responsible for the detoxification of carcinogens. A number of naturally occurring flavonoids have been shown to modulate the CYP450 system, including the induction of specific CYP isozymes, and the activation or inhibition of these enzymes. Some flavonoids alter CYPs through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, acting as either AhR agonists or antagonists. Inhibition of CYP enzymes, including CYP 1A1, 1A2, 2E1 and 3A4 by competitive or mechanism-based mechanisms also occurs. Flavones (chrysin, baicalein, and galangin), flavanones (naringenin) and isoflavones (genistein, biochanin A) inhibit the activity of aromatase (CYP19), thus decreasing estrogen biosynthesis and producing antiestrogenic effects, important in breast and prostate cancers. Activation of phase II detoxifying enzymes, such as UDP-glucuronyl transferase, glutathione S-transferase, and quinone reductase by flavonoids results in the detoxification of carcinogens and represents one mechanism of their anticarcinogenic effects. A number of flavonoids including fisetin, galangin, quercetin, kaempferol, and genistein represent potent non-competitive inhibitors of sulfotransferase 1A1 (or P-PST); this may represent an important mechanism for the chemoprevention of sulfation-induced carcinogenesis. Importantly, the effects of flavonoids on enzymes are generally dependent on the concentrations of flavonoids present, and the different flavonoids ingested. Due to the low oral bioavailability of many flavonoids, the concentrations achieved in vivo following dietary administration tend to be low, and may not reflect the concentrations tested under in vitro conditions; however, this may not be true following the ingestion of herbal preparations when much higher plasma concentrations may be obtained. Effects will also vary with the tissue distribution of enzymes, and with the species used in testing since differences between species in enzyme activities also can be substantial. Additionally, in humans, marked interindividual variability in drug-metabolizing enzymes occurs as a result of genetic and environmental factors. This variability in xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and the effect of flavonoid ingestion on enzyme expression and activity can contribute to the varying susceptibility different individuals have to diseases such as cancer. As well, flavonoids may also interact with chemotherapeutic drugs used in cancer treatment through the induction or inhibition of their metabolism.
PubMedId: 16289744
Journal Article: Toxicology in vitro : an international journal published in association with BIBRA, vol. 20, 2004
Authors: Xiao-Fei Zhou, Qingxiang Shao, Robert A Coburn, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The aim of this study was to develop quantitative structure-activity/pharmacokinetic relationships (QSAR/QSPKR) for a series of synthesized 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs) and pyridines as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitors. Molecular descriptors of test compounds were generated by 3D molecular modeling using SYBYL and KowWin programs. Forward inclusion coupled with multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to derive a QSAR equation for Ca2+ channel binding. A multivariate statistical technique, partial least square (PLS) regression, was applied to derive a QSAR model for P-gp inhibition and QSPKR models. Cross-validation using the "leave-one-out" method was performed to evaluate the predictive performance of models. For Ca2+ channel binding, the MLR equation indicated a good correlation between observed and predicted values (R2 = 0.90), and cross-validation confirmed the predictive ability of the model (Q2 = 0.67). For P-gp reversal, the model obtained by PLS could account for most of the variation in P-gp inhibition (R2 = 0.76) with fair predictive performance (Q2 = 0.62). Nine structurally related 1,4-DHP drugs were used for QSPKR analysis. The models could explain the majority of the variation in clearance (R2 = 0.90), and cross-validation confirmed the prediction ability (Q2 = 0.69). QSAR/QSPKR models were developed, and the QSAR models were capable of identifying synthesized 1,4-DHPs and pyridines with potent P-gp inhibition and reduced Ca2+ channel binding. The QSPKR models provide insight into the contribution of electronic, steric, and lipophilic factors to the clearance of DHPs.
PubMedId: 16158213
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 22, 2004
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Xiaodong Wang, Kazuko Sagawa, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a recently identified ATP-binding cassette transporter, important in drug disposition and in the development of multidrug resistance in cancer. Flavonoids, a major class of natural compounds widely present in foods and herbal products, have been shown to be human BCRP inhibitors. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential for in vivo pharmacokinetic interactions by comparing the pharmacokinetics of topotecan (a model BCRP substrate) after oral administration of 2 mg/kg topotecan with and without different doses of the flavonoids chrysin or 7,8-benzoflavone (BF) in rats and mdr1a/1b (-/-) mice. Coadministration of 50 mg/kg GF120918 [N-(4-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-isoquinolinyl)ethyl]-phenyl)-9, 10-dihydro-5-methoxy-9-oxo-4-acridine carboxamide] with 2 mg/kg topotecan significantly increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and bioavailability of topotecan by more than 4-fold in these animals, indicating the importance of BCRP in the bioavailability and disposition of topotecan in rats. Chrysin (50 microM) and BF (5 microM) significantly inhibited the BCRP-mediated transport of topotecan in BCRP-overexpressing MCF-7 MX100 cells (MCF-7 cells selected with mitoxantrone) to a level comparable to that observed with 10 microM fumitremorgin C (a potent BCRP inhibitor). However, neither chrysin nor BF significantly altered topotecan pharmacokinetics in rats or in mdr1a/1b (-/-) mice after oral coadministration of doses up to 50 mg/kg. The reason(s) for this lack of in vitro-in vivo association may be the lack of potent inhibition activity of the flavonoids against mouse or rat BCRP, as evidenced by our observation that these flavonoids have only weak, if any, inhibition activity against mouse Bcrp1-mediated transport of topotecan in MDCK-Bcrp1 cells.
PubMedId: 15608138
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 33, 2004
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Xinning Yang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a newly identified ATP-binding cassette transporter, shown to confer multidrug resistance (MDR) to a number of important anticancer agents and play an important function in governing drug disposition. Flavonoids are a class of polyphenolic compounds widely present in foods and herbal products. The interactions of flavonoids with P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 have been reported; however, their interaction with BCRP is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of 20 naturally occurring flavonoids on the cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of mitoxantrone in both BCRP-overexpressing and BCRP-negative human cell lines. BCRP-overexpressing and BCRP-negative human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and large cell lung carcinoma cells (NCI-H460) were used in these studies. Many of the tested flavonoids (50 microM) increased mitoxantrone accumulation in BCRP-overexpressing cells, completely reversing mitoxantrone resistance, with no effect on the corresponding BCRP-negative cells, indicating that these flavonoids are BCRP inhibitors. The effects of these flavonoids on the cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of mitoxantrone were flavonoid concentration dependent, and significant changes were produced at concentrations lower than 10 microM for most of the flavonoids. Chrysin and biochanin A were the most potent BCRP inhibitors, producing significant increases in mitoxantrone accumulation at concentrations of 0.5 or 1.0 microM and in mitoxantrone cytotoxicity at a concentration of 2.5 microM. Flavonoid glycosides had no effects on the BCRP-mediated transport of mitoxantrone. The results obtained in this study could be clinically relevant in terms of both MDR reversal in cancer treatment and drug-flavonoid pharmacokinetic interactions.
PubMedId: 15102949
Journal Article: Molecular pharmacology, vol. 65, 2004
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Xinning Yang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the dynamic parameter (EC50) of flavonoids apigenin, biochanin A, chrysin, genistein, kaempferol, hesperetin, naringenin, and silymarin for breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) inhibition when used alone, and to evaluate their potential interactions (additive, synergistic, or antagonistic) with regards to BCRP inhibition when used in multiple-flavonoid combinations. The effects of flavonoids on BCRP-mediated transport were examined by evaluating their effects on mitoxantrone accumulation and cytotoxicity in MCF-7 MX100 cells overexpressing BCRP. The EC50 values of these flavonoids for increasing mitoxantrone accumulation were estimated using a Hill equation. The potential interactions among multiple flavonoids with regard to BCRP inhibition were assessed by isobologram and Berenbaum's interaction index methods. The EC50 values of these flavonoids for increasing mitoxantrone accumulation ranged from 0.39+/-0.13 microM to 33.7+/-2.78 microM. Quantitative analysis of the combined effects of multiple flavonoids on mitoxantrone accumulation indicated that these flavonoids act additively in inhibiting BCRP when given as 2-, 3-, 5-, or 8-flavonoid combinations with equimolar concentrations of all constituents. The results of the mitoxantrone cytotoxicity studies were consistent with these findings. The additive effects of multiple flavonoids for BCRP inhibition suggests that prediction of BCRP-mediated food (herbal product)-drug interactions should also take into consideration the presence of multiple flavonoids and provides a rationale for using "flavonoid cocktails" as a potential approach for multidrug resistance reversal in cancer treatment.
PubMedId: 15290869
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 21, 2004
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Xinning Yang, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Pharmaceutical Research, vol. 21, pp. 1263-1273, 2004
Authors: Elaine Tseng, Elizabeth A. Scott Ramsay, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 229, pp. 835-842, 2004
Authors: Amrita V Kamath, Inger M Darling, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The objective of the current investigation was to examine the transport characteristics of choline, an endogenous quaternary ammonium compound, into human intestinal Caco-2 cells; the transport of choline has not been characterized in human intestine. The cellular accumulation of choline was independent of an inwardly directed Na(+) gradient and demonstrated temperature dependence and saturability. Using the initial uptake rates, choline accumulation was best characterized by a Michaelis-Menten equation and a diffusion component with a K(m) and V(max) of 110 +/- 3 micro mol/L and 2800 +/- 250 pmol/(mg protein. 10 min), respectively. Choline uptake was significantly inhibited by an excess of choline itself and by hemicholinium-3, a structural analog of choline. However other hydrophilic organic cations, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA) and N-methylnicotinamide (NMN), did not affect choline uptake in Caco-2 cells. Additionally, two typical p-glycoprotein substrates, daunomycin and verapamil, both inhibited choline accumulation. However the opposite was not true: choline did not inhibit DNM accumulation in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate the presence of a carrier-mediated transport system for choline in Caco-2 cells. The substrate specificity of this carrier is unlike that seen in the rat intestinal epithelium, and the human transport protein is distinct from those for TEA and NMN. P-glycoprotein substrates may inhibit choline uptake through specific or nonspecific interactions with the choline transporter.
PubMedId: 12888645
Journal Article: The Journal of nutrition, vol. 133, 2003
Authors: Marilyn E Morris, Hwa-Jeong Lee, Lisa M Predko
Abstract: Gender differences have been well described in pharmacokinetics and contribute to the interindividual variation in drug disposition, therapeutic response, and drug toxicity. Sex-related differences in the membrane transport of endogenous substrates and xenobiotics have been reported in various organs of the body including kidney, liver, intestine, and brain. These gender-related differences in transport systems could also contribute to interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. This review will focus on current knowledge of gender-associated differences in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds in a variety of body organs and will discuss the implications and the clinical significance of these observations.
PubMedId: 12773628
Journal Article: Pharmacological reviews, vol. 55, 2003
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Flavonoids are constituents of fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages, as well as components in herbal-containing dietary supplements. The objective of this investigation was to characterize the effect of flavonoids on P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated cellular efflux and to determine the molecular mechanism(s) of the flavonoid-drug interaction. Studies were conducted in the sensitive and multidrug resistant human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA435/LCC6 and examined the effects of the flavonoids biochanin A, morin, phloretin, and silymarin on daunomycin (DNM) accumulation and doxorubicin cytotoxicity. The potential mechanism(s) involved in the interaction was evaluated by determining flavonoid effects on 1) P-gp ATPase activity, 2) [(3)H]azidopine photoaffinity labeling of P-gp, and 3) cellular P-gp levels. The flavonoids increased [(3)H]DNM accumulation in P-gp positive cells, but not P-gp negative cells, and these effects were both flavonoid concentration- and P-gp expression level-dependent. Biochanin A and silymarin potentiated doxorubicin cytotoxicity in P-gp positive cells. Biochanin A and phloretin stimulated, whereas morin and silymarin inhibited P-gp ATPase activity, confirming that these flavonoids interact with P-gp. Morin and silymarin significantly inhibited [(3)H]azidopine photoaffinity labeling of P-gp, suggesting a direct interaction with P-gp substrate binding. A 24-h preincubation with all flavonoids, followed by flavonoid removal, did not alter cellular P-gp level in P-gp positive cells. In conclusion, biochanin A, morin, phloretin, and silymarin all inhibited P-gp-mediated cellular efflux and the mechanism of the interaction involved, at least in part, a direct interaction. The findings of this study indicate a potential for significant flavonoid-drug interactions with P-gp substrates.
PubMedId: 12604704
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 304, 2003
Authors: Hang Nguyen, Shuzhong Zhang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of dietary flavonoids, which are present in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages, on the transport of daunomycin (DNM) and vinblastine (VBL) in Panc-1 cells. Panc-1 is a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, which expresses Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein1 (MRP1). The 2-h accumulation of (3)H-DNM and (3)H-VBL was determined in the presence and absence of 22 flavonoids. Biochanin-A, genistein, quercetin, chalcone, silymarin, phloretin, morin, and kaempferol, at 100 microM concentrations, all significantly increased the accumulation of both DNM and VBL in Panc-1 cells, with morin increasing DNM and VBL accumulation by 546 +/- 50% (mean +/- SE, n = 9) and 553 +/- 37% (n = 9), respectively. Fisetin treatment significantly decreased the accumulation of both DNM and VBL. Concentration-dependent studies demonstrated significant effects on VBL accumulation at 50 microM, but not at 10 microM concentrations, except for chalcone that was effective at a 10 microM concentration. Following a 24-h incubation, there were no changes in MRP1 membrane expression or glutathione-S-transferase activity in cells. Cellular glutathione (GSH) concentrations were significantly decreased following a 2-h incubation with biochanin A, chalcone, genistein, phloretin, quercetin, and silymarin, and following a 24-h incubation with biochanin A, chalcone, genistein, and phloretin. These results therefore indicate that the flavonoids morin, chalcone, silymarin, phloretin, genistein, quercetin, biochanin A, and kaempferol can inhibit MRP1-mediated drug transport, effects that may involve binding interactions with MRP1, as well as modulation of GSH concentrations.
PubMedId: 12532374
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 92, 2003
Authors: Yan Ji, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is a dietary compound present in cruciferous vegetables that has cancer-preventive properties. Our objective was to develop and validate a novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry procedure to analyze PEITC concentrations in human plasma and urine. Following hexane extraction, ammonia was added to samples to derivatize PEITC to phenethylthiourea. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C(18) column with acetonitrile/5 mM formic acid (60:40, v/v) as the mobile phase followed by tandem mass spectrometry detection in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Deuterium-labeled PEITC was used as the internal standard. The detection limit was 2 nM and calibration curves were linear from 7.8 to 2000 nM. The intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation were less than 5 and 10%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day accuracies ranged from 101.0 to 104.2% and from 102.8 to 118.6%, respectively. The recovery from spiked human plasma and urine ranged from 100.3 to 113.5% and from 98.3 to 103.9%, respectively. The assay was used to measure PEITC in plasma and urine samples obtained from subjects after consumption of 100g of watercress. This novel assay represents the first analytical method with the sensitivity and specificity to determine plasma and urine concentrations of PEITC.
PubMedId: 14622957
Journal Article: Analytical biochemistry, vol. 323, 2003
Authors: Shuzhong Zhang, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of flavonoids biochanin A and silymarin on intestinal absorption of P-gp substrates by determining their effects on P-gp-mediated efflux in Caco-2 cells. The cellular accumulation and bidirectional transport of digoxin and vinblastine in Caco-2 cells were determined in the presence and absence of flavonoids. The 1.5-h accumulation of digoxin and vinblastine in Caco-2 cells was significantly increased by 50 microM biochanin A or silymarin, and this effect was flavonoid-concentration dependent. The AP-to-BL transport of digoxin was significantly increased, whereas the BL-to-AP transport was significantly decreased by 50 microM biochanin A or 75 microM silymarin. At 150 microM concentrations of biochanin A or silymarin, mean transport ratios (P(app,B-A)/P(app,A-B)) of 1.62 and 4.48, respectively, compared with the control ratio of 43.4, were obtained. These results indicate that biochanin A and silymarin can inhibit P-gp-mediated efflux in Caco-2 cells, suggesting they could potentially increase the absorption/bioavailability of coadministered drugs that are P-gp substrates.
PubMedId: 12948016
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 20, 2003
Authors: Ke Hu, Marilyn E Morris
Abstract: A rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay for the determination of alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (1-NITC) and two metabolites alpha-naphthylamine (1-NA) and alpha-naphthylisocyanate (1-NIC) in rat plasma and urine has been developed. The chromatographic analysis was carried out using reversed-phase isocratic elution with a Partisphere C(18) 5-microm column, a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (ACN-H(2)O 70:30, v/v), and detection by ultraviolet (UV) absorption at 305 nm. The lower limits of quantitation (LLQ) in rat plasma, urine, and ACN were 10, 30, and 10 ng/ml for 1-NITC; 30, 100, and 30 ng/ml for 1-NA; and 30 ng/ml in ACN for 1-NIC. At low (10 ng/ml), medium (500 ng/ml), and high (5000 ng/ml) concentrations of quality control samples (QCs), the range of within-day and between-day accuracies were 95-106 and 97-103% for 1-NITC in plasma, respectively. Stability studies showed that 1-NITC was stable at all tested temperatures in ACN, and at -20 and -80 degrees C in plasma, urine, and ACN precipitated plasma and urine, but degraded at room temperature and 4 degrees C. 1-NA was stable in all of the tested matrices at all temperatures. 1-NIC was unstable in plasma, urine, and ACN precipitated plasma and urine, but stable in ACN. The degradation product of 1-NITC and 1-NIC in universal buffer was confirmed to be 1-NA. 1-NITC and 1-NA were detected and quantified in rat plasma and urine, following the administration of a 25 mg/kg i.v. dose of 1-NITC to a female Sprague-Dawley rat.
PubMedId: 12668067
Journal Article: Journal of chromatography. B, Analytical technologies in the biomedical and life sciences, vol. 788, 2003
Authors: Yan Ji, Marilyn E Morris
Journal-article: Analytical Biochemistry, vol. 323, pp. 39-47, 2003
Authors: M.E. Morris, H. Murer
Journal-article: The Journal of Membrane Biology, vol. 181, pp. 1-9, 2001
Authors: M E Morris, H Murer
PubMedId: 11331932
Journal Article: The Journal of membrane biology, vol. 181, 2000
Authors: H J Lee, K Sagawa, W Shi, H Murer, M E Morris
Abstract: Serum sulfate concentrations are elevated in infants, young children, and pregnant women due, at least in part, to increased renal sulfate reabsorption. Little is known about the effects of hormones, particularly those involved in growth, development, and pregnancy, on renal sulfate reabsorption. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effects of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), progesterone (PG), and 17beta-estradiol (EST) on renal sodium/sulfate co-transport. 35S-sulfate uptake was determined in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK)/NaSi-1 cells (MDCK cells that have been stably transfected with rat sodium/sulfate co-transporter (NaSi-1) cDNA) and in opossum kidney (OK) cells. NaSi-1 mRNA was determined by RT-PCR and protein levels by ELISA. GH (0.1 nM) significantly increased the sodium/sulfate co-transport in MDCK/NaSi-1 cells up to 35%. IGF-1 induced a concentration-related stimulation of the sodium/sulfate co-transport with a maximal response observed at 1000 nM (59% increase). Sodium-dependent sulfate uptake was significantly increased when cells were preincubated with 10 nM PG, 10 nM EST, or 10 nM PG/10 nM EST up to 41%, 46%, or 39%, respectively. OK cells exhibited endogenous sodium-dependent sulfate transport; significantly increased sodium/sulfate co-transport was also observed in OK cells that were preincubated with GH, IGF-1, and PG/EST, although not with EST alone. The NaSi-1 mRNA and NaSi-1 protein levels were significantly increased in MDCK/NaSi-1 cells treated with 0.1 nM GH, 100 nM IGF-1, 10 nM PG, and/or 10 nM EST compared with control. These results suggest that the increased renal sulfate reabsorption that occurs in neonates, young and pregnant humans, and animals could be mediated by the increased steady-state levels of NaSi-1 mRNA produced by the higher plasma concentrations of GH, IGF-1, or PG/EST.
PubMedId: 10998198
Journal Article: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N.Y.), vol. 225, 2000
Authors: K Sagawa, I M Darling, H Murer, M E Morris
Abstract: Glucocorticoid administration decreases renal sodium/phosphate cotransport in the proximal tubule due to a down-regulation of the sodium/phosphate cotransporter but has no effect on the sodium-dependent transport of glucose or proline. The objectives of the present investigation were to determine the effects of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone (MPL) on 1) inorganic sulfate renal clearance in rats in vivo, 2) sodium/sulfate cotransport in kidney cortex membrane vesicles, and 3) the cellular mechanism of the MPL-induced alterations in sulfate renal transport. Male adrenalectomized Wistar rats received an i.v. dose of 50 mg/kg MPL or the vehicle. Urine samples were collected for 12 h after the administration of MPL, and blood samples were collected at the midpoint of the urine collection. Other animals were sacrificed at 4, 6, and 12 h after MPL administration, and the kidney cortex was removed for RNA or membrane preparations. Kidney cortex sodium/sulfate cotransporter (NaSi-1) mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and NaSi-1 protein levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The urinary excretion rate and renal clearance of sulfate were significantly increased in MPL-treated animals (144.0 +/- 27.0 versus 65.3 +/- 21.3 micromol/12 h/kg and 0.208 +/- 0.038 versus 0. 078 +/- 0.025 ml/min/kg, mean +/- S.E., n = 9-12 in treated versus control). The V(max) value for sodium-dependent sulfate transport in brush border membrane vesicles (representing reabsorption in the proximal tubules) was significantly decreased in MPL-treated animals compared with controls (0.68 +/- 0.07 versus 0.88 +/- 0.05 nmol/mg of protein/10 s, mean +/- S.E.). There was no change in the K(m) value for sodium/sulfate cotransport in brush-border membrane and no change in sulfate/anion exchange in basolateral membrane vesicles. Membrane fluidity in brush border membrane and basolateral membrane vesicles, determined by the fluorescence polarization of 1, 6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was unaltered by MPL treatment. NaSi-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased at 4 and 6 h, but not 12 h, after MPL administration, whereas NaSi-1 protein expression was significantly decreased at 4, 6, and 12 h. Therefore, MPL treatment increases the renal clearance of inorganic sulfate, at least in part, due to down-regulation of NaSi-1 mRNA and protein expression in the kidney.
PubMedId: 10900245
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 294, 2000
Authors: H H Parikh, K McElwain, V Balasubramanian, W Leung, D Wong, M E Morris, M Ramanathan
Abstract: To develop and validate a rapid method for determining the dissociation constants with which pharmaceutical candidates and drugs bind to serum albumin and to alpha1-acid glycoprotein with the goal of deducing the extent of binding. The quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of serum albumin and alpha1-acid glycoprotein was monitored by spectrofluorimetry and the data were used to calculate the apparent dissociation constant. Sodium warfarin was used to probe the warfarin-binding site of serum albumin and diazepam was used to probe the benzodiazepine binding site. Additionally, the binding of sodium salicylate, phenylbutazone, sulfinpyrazone, iophenoxic acid, theophylline, chloramphenicol, acetaminophen, lithium chloride and ampicillin were also investigated. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride and imipramine hydrochloride were used as probes for alpha1-acid glycoprotein. The assays were also extended to the multiwell format. The quenching curves were fitted to the quadratic binding equation to determine the dissociation constants. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements are an excellent predictor of the drug binding to human serum albumin and to alpha1-acid glycoprotein. These measurements detect binding to the warfarin and benzodiazepine binding sites of human serum albumin. The dissociation constants estimated using the method compare favorably to the dissociation constants previously reported by Epps et al. using extrinsic fluorescence methodology, and the results correlate well with equilibrium dialysis using drug displacement endpoints. These measurements can be carried out with small samples and do not require separation of the bound and unbound species. Additionally, the proposed methods eliminate membrane separations, are not compound specific and do not require analytical chromatography or mass spectrometry for quantitation. Spectrofluorimetry may prove to be a useful method for rapidly determining the protein binding of combinatorial libraries.
PubMedId: 10888318
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 17, 2000
Authors: Hwa Jeong Lee, Kazuko Sagawa, Wei Shi, Heini Murer, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 225, pp. 49-57, 2000
Authors: K Sagawa, H Murer, M E Morris
Abstract: Decreased serum sulfate concentrations are observed in hypothyroid patients. However, the mechanism involved in thyroid hormone-induced alterations of renal sulfate homeostasis is unknown. The objectives of this investigation were to determine the effect of 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism in rats on 1) the in vivo serum concentrations, renal clearance, and renal reabsorption of sulfate, 2) the in vitro renal transport in brush-border membrane (BBM) and basolateral membrane (BLM) vesicles, and 3) the cellular mechanism of the hypothyroid-induced alteration in sulfate renal transport. Serum sulfate concentrations, renal fractional reabsorption of sulfate, and creatinine clearance were decreased significantly in the hypothyroid group. The Vmax values for sodium-sulfate cotransport in BBM were significantly decreased in the kidney cortex from the hypothyroid animals (0.90 +/- 0.31 vs. 0.49 +/- 0.08 nmol. mg-1. 10 s-1, n = 5-6, P < 0.05) without changes in Km. There were no significant differences in Vmax and Km for sulfate/anion exchange transport in BLM. Sodium-dependent sulfate transporter (NaSi-1) mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower in the kidney cortex from hypothyroid rats. Hypothyroidism did not alter the membrane motional order (fluidity) in BBM and BLM, which indicates that the changes in the membrane fluidity do not represent the mechanism for the altered renal transport. These results demonstrate that PTU-induced hypothyroidism decreases sodium-sulfate cotransport by downregulation of the NaSi-1 gene.
PubMedId: 9887092
Journal Article: The American journal of physiology, vol. 276, 1999
Authors: Hwa Jeong Lee, Sathyamangalam V. Balasubramanian, Heini Murer, J??rg Biber, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 88, pp. 976-980, 1999
Authors: Hwa Jeong Lee, Sathyamangalam V. Balasubramanian, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 221, pp. 336-344, 1999
Authors: H. J. Lee, S. V. Balasubramanian, M. E. Morris
Journal-article: Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 221, pp. 336-344, 1999
Authors: Kazuko Sagawa, Heini Murer, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology, vol. 276, pp. F164-F171, 1999
Authors: K Sagawa, D C DuBois, B Han, R R Almon, J Biber, H Murer, M E Morris
Abstract: The sodium-dependent sulfate transporter (NaSi-1) DNA has been recently identified from rat kidney cortex. The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative assay for the NaSi-1 transporter protein. The NaSi-1 antigen was prepared by fusion protein techniques following analysis of the primary sequence for antigenicity. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against the NaSi-1 antigen were raised in rabbits and mice, respectively. The specificity of the raised antibodies was examined by Western analysis using brush-border membrane (BBM) and basolateral membrane (BLM) purified from rat kidney cortex. Both NaSi-1 polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies detected a 69-kDa protein in the BBM. Using the purified monoclonal antibody as the capture antibody and the polyclonal antibody as the detecting antibody, a simple and sensitive sandwich-type enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to quantitate NaSi-1 transporter protein levels in tissue. The specificity of the assay was examined using BBM, BLM and NaSi-1-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The assay was capable of detecting NaSi-1 at levels as low as 6.58 fmol. The concentration of NaSi-1 transporter protein in crude membrane isolated from rat kidney cortex was 0.094+/-0.014 fmol/ microg protein (mean+/-SD of three preparations).
PubMedId: 9817796
Journal Article: Pflugers Archiv : European journal of physiology, vol. 437, 1998
Authors: A V Kamath, M E Morris
Abstract: P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the multidrug resistance gene product, is expressed in a normal liver exclusively on the canalicular membrane of the hepatocyte. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of age on the P-gp transport system using canalicular membrane (cLPM) vesicles isolated from the liver of developing (22 days old) and adult rats. No differences in protein yield, intravesicular volumes, and enrichments of cLPM enzymes or enzymes representing contamination of subcellular organelles were found for vesicles isolated from both groups, demonstrating the isolation of similar cLPM vesicle preparations. The transport of daunomycin (DNM), a P-gp substrate, was used to study age-related functional differences in P-gp. DNM uptake in the presence of ATP was greater than uptake in the absence of ATP in both young and adult cLPM vesicles, showing that P-gp is functional in both groups. In young and adult groups only ATP was a potent stimulator of transport when compared with ATP degradation products and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue. Although ATP-dependent uptake tended to be greater in the adult compared to the young, there was no statistically significant difference in DNM kinetics (Vmax, km, gamma) between groups. Canalicular membrane from the young rats showed decreased fluidity, as assessed by the fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene; however there was no significant difference between groups. Examination of P-gp expression using the monoclonal antibody C219 revealed similar levels of expression in the young as in the adult. Our results suggest that P-gp in the bile canaliculus of developing rats is functional with similar levels of function and expression as observed in the adult.
PubMedId: 9523982
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 87, 1998
Authors: K Sagawa, L J Benincosa, H Murer, M E Morris
Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase sulfate renal clearance and decrease the fractional reabsorption of sulfate by the kidneys. The mechanism of this alteration of inorganic sulfate homeostasis is unknown. The objectives of this study were 1) to investigate if sulfate renal transport is altered in isolated membrane vesicles after pretreatment of animals in vivo with ibuprofen (IBU), and 2) to determine the cellular mechanism of changes in sulfate renal transport. Female Lewis rats received IBU at a i.v. dose of 27 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 33 microg/min for 4 hr. Sulfate transport was studied using brush border (BBM) and basolateral membrane (BLM) vesicles isolated from rat kidney cortex. The Vmax for the sodium-dependent sulfate cotransport (NaSi-1) in BBM was significantly lower in the IBU group compared with the control group (0.79 +/- 0.23 vs. 1.25 +/- 0.17 nmol/mg protein/10 sec, respectively; P <.05) with no change in Km. There were no significant differences between the study groups in sulfate anion exchange kinetics in BLM vesicles. NaSi-1 transporter mRNA level in kidney cortex and protein level in BBM were significantly lower in animals pretreated with IBU compared with that in control animals. There was no change in membrane fluidity of BBM and BLM isolated from IBU-treated animals as measured by the fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. These results indicate that IBU treatment alters sodium-dependent sulfate cotransport by a downregulation of mRNA and protein of NaSi-1 transporter in BBM.
PubMedId: 9864297
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 287, 1998
Authors: K Sagawa, D C DuBois, R R Almon, H Murer, M E Morris
Abstract: The renal transport and fractional reabsorption of inorganic sulfate is altered under conditions of sulfate deficiency or excess. The objective of this study was to examine the cellular mechanisms of adaptation of renal sodium/sulfate cotransport after varying dietary intakes of a sulfur containing amino acid, methionine. Female Lewis rats were divided into four groups and fed diets containing various concentrations of methionine (0, 0.3, 0.82 and 2.46%) for 8 days. Urinary excretion rates and renal clearance of sulfate were significantly decreased in the animals fed a 0% methionine diet or a 0.3% methionine diet, and significantly increased in the animals fed a 2.46% methionine diet when evaluated on days 4 and 7. Serum sulfate concentrations were unchanged by diet treatment in all animals. The fractional reabsorption of sulfate was significantly increased in the animals fed the 0% methionine diet and the 0.3% methionine diets, and decreased in the animals fed the 2.46% methionine diet. Increased mRNA and protein levels for the sodium/sulfate transporter (NaSi-1) were found in the kidney cortex following treatment with the 0 and 0.3% methionine diet groups. Sulfate homeostasis by renal reabsorption is maintained by an up-regulation of steady state levels of NaSi-1 mRNA and protein when the diet is low in methionine.
PubMedId: 9864292
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 287, 1998
Authors: S V Balasubramanian, R M Straubinger, M E Morris
Abstract: Salicylic acid (SA) can inhibit the facilitated transport of inorganic sulfate in the kidney, placenta, and erythrocytes. One mechanism of this inhibition could involve the interaction of SA with membranes, resulting in altered function of transporter protein(s) due to changes in membrane fluidity. Such membrane effects could result in altered membrane transport and consequently in changes in the pharmacokinetics and the therapeutic activity of both xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. We investigated the effect of SA on the fluidity of brush border membrane (BBM) and basolateral membrane (BLM) isolated from rat kidney and also on the physical properties (such as phase transition temperature and fluidity) of model membranes by fluorescence polarization and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. SA decreased the lipid order parameter (S) of BBM and BLM membranes in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the addition of SA makes the membrane more fluid. The fluidizing effect of SA was more pronounced than that of benzyl alcohol. Studies were carried out with protein-free model membranes composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) to investigate the effects of SA on the bilayer membrane lipids. SA decreased the fluorescence polarization of DPH (1,6-diphenyl 1,3,5-hexatriene) incorporated in DPPC vesicles. DSC studies demonstrated that SA broadened the phase transition temperature of DPPC vesicles and suggested that SA is located in the C1-C8 region of the acyl chain. In protein-free model membranes, SA exerted fluidizing effects through its incorporation into the cooperative hydrophobic region of the bilayer. The perturbation of membrane physical properties induced by SA and its hydrophobic localization in the membrane bilayer may be important in the SA-induced alteration of sulfate membrane transport.
PubMedId: 9040095
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 86, 1997
Authors: Y Kwon, M E Morris
Abstract: The objective of the present simulation study was to investigate the effects of hepatic zonal heterogeneity of membrane transporter proteins and intrinsic elimination activities on hepatic clearance (CL) and drug concentration gradient profiles in the sinusoidal blood and hepatocytes. The model used in the simulations assumes an apparent unidirectional carrier-mediated transport and a bidirectional diffusion of substrates in the hepatic sinusoidal membrane as well as a nonlinear intrinsic elimination. Three different distribution patterns of the transporter and the metabolizing enzyme along the sinusoidal flow path were used for the simulations. The effects of changes in the Michaelis-Menten parameters for those nonlinear processes, and in the unbound fractions of the drug in blood and tissue components were investigated. Significant differences in CL occurred when the distribution patterns of the transporter and/or the metabolizing enzyme activities were altered under nonlinear conditions. The highest CL values were observed when the transporter and the metabolizing enzyme had similar distribution patterns within the liver acinus, while opposite distribution patterns produced the lowest CL values. Tissue concentration profiles were significantly affected by the distribution patterns of the transporter, but the changes in blood concentration profiles were relatively small. Altering protein binding in blood produced significant changes in CL, and blood and tissue concentration gradients, while altering protein binding in tissue affected only drug accumulation patterns within hepatocytes, regardless of the distribution patterns of the transporter or the metabolizing enzyme. The present simulations demonstrate that hepatic zonal heterogeneities in the transporter and the metabolizing enzyme activities can significantly influence hepatic clearance and/or drug concentration gradient profiles in the sinusoidal blood and hepatocytes.
PubMedId: 9210197
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 14, 1997
Authors: Y Kwon, A V Kamath, M E Morris
Abstract: P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene product, is exclusively located on the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Recent studies using isolated rat canalicular liver plasma membrane (cLPM) vesicles indicate that daunomycin (DNM) is a substrate for the ATP-dependent P-gp efflux system in the rat liver. The isoforms of P-gp present in cLPM and in cancer cell lines differ in that the major form present in the liver represents the gene product of mdr2 in mice (MDR3 in humans; class III) while the isoform of P-gp in cancer cells is the gene product of mdr1 in mice (MDR1 in humans, class I). The objective of this study was to examine the inhibitory effects of various organic compounds, most of which have been studied previously in MDR cancer cells, on P-gp-mediated [3H]DNM uptake into cLPM. Also, the stereospecificity of P-gp for its substrates was investigated by comparing the inhibitory effects of the enantiomers and the racemic mixtures of verapamil and propranolol. DNM exhibited ATP-dependent active transport into rat liver cLPM with a Km of 26.8 +/- 13.4 microM and a Vmax of 4.9 +/- 0.8 nmol/45 s/mg of protein (n = 4). ADP, AMP, and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue did not increase DNM transport over the control value. Thirty-one potential inhibitors were examined; only acridine orange, doxorubicin, verapamil, propranolol, phosphatidylcholine, beta-estradiol glucuronide, and DNM itself showed statistically significant inhibition of [3H]DNM uptake into cLPM. These results suggest that only a limited number of substrates bind to or are transported across the hepatic canalicular membrane via P-gp. Phosphatidylcholine, a substrate for the gene product of the class III P-gp gene, produced significant inhibition of [3H]DNM transport (30.6% at a 10-fold-higher substrate concentration), suggesting that transport may be mediated, at least in part, by this P-gp gene product. There were no statistically significant differences in the inhibitory effects of the enantiomers and racemate of verapamil on [3H]DNM transport into cLPM, but the enantiomers of propranolol exhibited stereospecific inhibition of DNM transport. (R)-(+)-Propranolol produced a statistically significant inhibition of [3H]DNM transport similar to that observed with the racemic mixture, while (S)(-)-propranolol showed no inhibition. These findings suggest that bile canalicular P-gp may exhibit stereospecificity of binding or transport for its substrates.
PubMedId: 8877882
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 85, 1996
Authors: Y Kwon, R D Lee, M E Morris
Abstract: Choline, an endogenous quaternary ammonium ion, is transported into the liver by both saturable and nonsaturable processes. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the driving force(s) for uptake of choline in rat liver basolateral membrane (blLPM) and canalicular membrane (cLPM) vesicles. Choline is transported into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space in both blLPM and cLPM. Uptake of [3H]choline into both blLPM and cLPM exhibited temperature dependence (0 degree C vs. 37 degrees C). A valinomycin-induced inside-negative K+ diffusion potential significantly stimulated initial uptake of [3H]choline in both vesicles. Choline uptake in blLPM and cLPM was not stimulated in the presence of an inwardly directed sodium gradient or an outwardly directed H+ gradient, and ATP did not enhance choline uptake in cLPM. Choline itself and structurally similar derivatives, such as hemicholinium-3 and succinylcholine, inhibited [3H]choline uptake 11 to 92% (at 10-fold higher concentrations) in blLPM and cLPM. Other cations, including N1-methylnicotinamide, thiamine and d-tubocurarine, and cardioglycosides did not inhibit choline transport in either vesicle preparation. In addition, [3H]choline uptake into both blLPM and cLPM was enhanced when vesicles were preloaded with nonradiolabeled choline (trans-stimulation). Kinetic studies indicated that choline was transported into blLPM by both saturable and passive processes and into cLPM predominantly by a saturable process. These results suggest that the transport of choline is likely mediated by a potential-sensitive conductive pathway in both blLPM and cLPM. The electrogenic pathway in cLPM may play a role in the reabsorption of choline from bile.
PubMedId: 8930183
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 279, 1996
Authors: S B Hansel, M E Morris
Abstract: Conjugation/deconjugation cycling plays an important role in the physiologic regulation of the concentration of endogenous compounds that form conjugated metabolites. Less is known concerning the deconjugation of xenobiotics. The model compound p-nitrophenol (pNP) is conjugated to sulfate and glucuronide metabolites which can also undergo hydrolysis, via separate enzyme systems, to regenerate pNP. In the present investigation, computer simulations were performed using literature values for the KM and Vmax for each of the four enzyme systems involved in net pNP conjugation. The apparent sulfation rate, apparent glucuronidation rate, and the extraction ratio (E) of pNP were each examined (i) as a function of pNP concentration, (ii) following alterations in the KM and Vmax values for the deconjugation enzymes, (iii) after modulating the enzyme distribution patterns along the liver flow path for both the conjugating and deconjugating enzymes, and (iv) in the presence of drug metabolite diffusional barriers for membrane transport. Results of these simulations demonstrated that changes in the KM or Vmax for deglucuronidation produced changes not only in net glucuronidation but also in net sulfation. Overall extraction (E) of the parent compound was only affected when glucuronidation was an important pathway, i.e., at higher pNP concentrations. Similar results were observed with changes in desulfation, with desulfation having the greatest effects at low pNP concentrations where sulfation represents the predominant metabolic pathway. Changes in the enzyme distribution patterns for the deconjugation pathways showed that the greatest influence on net conjugation rates occurred when hydrolase enzyme activity was distributed downstream from the respective forward reaction. In the presence of a diffusional barrier for metabolite transport (i.e., when the diffusional clearance was one tenth of blood flow), net metabolism of parent was diminished with E decreasing from 0.74, in the absence of a barrier, to 0.23, since the generated metabolite remained, to a great extent, within hepatocytes and underwent a more pronounced hydrolysis. In the presence of diffusional barriers for uptake of the conjugated metabolites, the lowest drug extraction and metabolite formation rates were observed when the distribution of the conjugation and deconjugation pathways across the liver were the same. Therefore, the effects of deconjugation on hepatic drug removal and metabolite formation are highly dependent on the enzymatic parameters of both the forward and reverse reactions, the parent drug concentration, the enzyme distribution patterns, and the presence of diffusional barriers for metabolite membrane transport. Since a change in the deconjugation of one metabolite can influence the net formation of not only itself but also other metabolites, and overall drug extraction, evaluation of conjugation/deconjugation cycling represents an important consideration in pharmacokinetic studies involving physiological-, pathological-, or pharmacological-induced alterations in conjugate formation.
PubMedId: 8875348
Journal Article: Journal of pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutics, vol. 24, 1996
Authors: Steven B. Hansel, Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics, vol. 24, pp. 219-243, 1996
Authors: Y Kwon, M E Morris
PubMedId: 7494812
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 12, 1995
Authors: M J Zamlauski-Tucker, M E Morris, J E Springate
Abstract: Renal proximal tubule dysfunction has been reported in patients treated with the chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide. The present study investigated whether ifosfamide or its metabolites acrolein and chloroacetaldehyde would impair function in the isolated perfused rat kidney. Renal function was monitored before and after these chemicals were added to a modified Krebs-Ringer-bicarbonate perfusion medium containing 6.6 g/dl albumin and a mixture of substrates. No functional changes were observed when ifosfamide (470 microM) or acrolein (470 microM) was added to the perfusate. Addition of chloroacetaldehyde (210 microM) resulted in significant decreases in the fractional reabsorption of sodium (from 92 to 32%), glucose (from 97 to 46%), inorganic phosphate (from 88 to 22%), and inorganic sulfate (from 94 to 86%). There were no changes in glomerular filtration rate. PAH clearance also significantly decreased from 4.1 to 0.7 ml/min per gram of kidney weight, indicating impairment of proximal tubule organic acid secretion. This impairment was associated with a significant decline in the extraction ratio for PAH, suggesting abnormal PAH uptake at the basolateral membrane. These results show that chloroacetaldehyde causes generalized renal proximal tubule dysfunction and that it may be the ifosfamide metabolite responsible for nephrotoxic side effects.
PubMedId: 7974492
Journal Article: Toxicology and applied pharmacology, vol. 129, 1994
Authors: M.J. Zamlauskitucker, M.E. Morris, J.E. Springate
Journal-article: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, vol. 129, pp. 170-175, 1994
Authors: L J Benincosa, M E Morris
PubMedId: 8104138
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 21, 1993
Authors: L J Benincosa, M E Morris
Abstract: The objectives of the current investigation were: (1) to examine the effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, tiaprofenic acid (TA), on sulfate renal reabsorption, and (2) to determine if concomitant prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) could reverse these effects. In crossover studies, female Lewis rats (n = 9) received either TA (as an intravenous (i.v.) bolus injection of 15 mg/kg and constant infusion of 0.02 mg/min) or its vehicle for 6 h. A blood sample was obtained at 5 h and urine was collected between 4 and 6 h. At a steady-state TA serum concentration of approximately 190 micrograms/ml, the PGE2 urinary excretion rate was inhibited by > 90% with no change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), as measured by creatinine clearance. TA administration resulted in a significant decrease in serum sulfate concentrations (0.65 +/- 0.22 vs 1.1 +/- 0.15 mM, mean +/- SD, p < 0.01) and increase in sulfate clearance ratio (0.32 +/- 0.14 vs 0.13 +/- 0.06, p < 0.01) when compared to the vehicle-treated period. There was also a significant decrease in the fraction of sulfate reabsorbed by the kidneys (0.68 +/- 0.14 vs 0.87 +/- 0.06 in the vehicle-treated period, p < 0.01). In a second crossover study, rats received either TA or TA plus PGE2. PGE2 was administered as an infusion (0.1 micrograms/min) beginning 210 min after the start of the TA infusion. An additional group of rats served as controls and received both vehicles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMedId: 8361986
Journal Article: Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids, vol. 49, 1993
Authors: L.J. Benincosa, M.E. Morris
Journal-article: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 49, pp. 503-508, 1993
Authors: M E Morris
Abstract: Magnesium is an essential cofactor for many enzymatic reactions, especially those involved in energy metabolism. Deficits of magnesium are prevalent due to inadequate intake or malabsorption and due to the renal loss of magnesium that occurs in certain disease states (alcoholism, diabetes) and with drug therapy (diuretics, aminoglycosides, cisplatin, digoxin, cyclosporin, amphotericin B). Protracted deficits of magnesium in humans and animals result in neurological disturbances, including hyperexcitability, convulsions and various psychiatric symptoms ranging from apathy to psychosis, some of which can be reversed with magnesium supplementation, others requiring correction of the dysregulation mechanism. Although the role of magnesium in neuronal function is not completely understood, a lowering of CSF or brain magnesium can induce epileptiform activity and there is an association between decreased CSF magnesium and the development of seizures. CSF concentrations of magnesium are normally higher than magnesium plasma ultrafiltrate (diffusible) concentrations due to the active transport of magnesium across the blood-brain barrier. Under conditions of magnesium deficiency, CSF concentrations decline, although this decline lags behind and is less pronounced than the changes observed in plasma magnesium concentrations. Decreases in CSF magnesium concentrations correlate with the alterations observed in extracellular brain magnesium concentrations in animals following the dietary deprivation of magnesium. CSF magnesium concentrations can readily be repleted following magnesium supplementation, although high dose magnesium therapy, such as that used in the treatment of convulsions in eclampsia, will only increase CSF magnesium concentrations to a very limited degree (approximately 11-18 per cent) above physiological concentrations. Greater increases in CSF magnesium may occur in neonates since neonatal swine, following treatment with magnesium, have CSF magnesium concentrations that are similar to their plasma concentrations. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in magnesium deficiency and its neurological consequences due to the finding that magnesium, at physiological concentrations, blocks N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in neurones. NMDA receptors are normally activated by glutamate and/or aspartate which represent the principal neurotransmitters for excitatory synaptic transmission in vertebrate CNS. Magnesium deficiency produces epileptiform activity in the CNS which can be blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists. Other mechanisms, including alterations in Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity, cAMP/cGMP concentrations and calcium currents in pre- and postsynaptic membranes, may also be at least partially responsible for the neuronal effects associated with low brain magnesium. Further studies are necessary to increase our understanding of the neurological implications of magnesium deficit in the central nervous system.
PubMedId: 1296767
Journal Article: Magnesium research, vol. 5, 1992
Authors: M E Morris, L J Benincosa
Abstract: The objective of the present investigation was to examine the influence of inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis on the renal clearance of inorganic sulfate, an electrolyte involved in the biotransformation of both exogenous and endogenous substrates. Homeostasis of inorganic sulfate is maintained predominantly by renal reabsorption in the proximal tubule. Using a crossover study design, the renal clearance of sulfate was assessed in conscious female Lewis rats during control periods and following the infusion of two structurally dissimilar nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ibuprofen (IBU) and indomethacin (INDO). Animals were infused with IBU or INDO to achieve steady state concentrations of 59 +/- 8 micrograms/ml (mean +/- SD) of IBU and 22 +/- 3 micrograms/ml of INDO. At these serum concentrations, IBU and INDO produced greater than 80% decrease in the urinary excretion of prostaglandin (PG) E2. Treatment with either IBU or INDO significantly increased the renal clearance of sulfate, but did not alter the glomerular filtration rate as assessed by creatinine clearance. The role of prostaglandins in the effects of IBU and INDO on sulfate homeostasis was investigated by examining the influence of concomitant intraarterial PGE2 administration (infusion of 0.1 micrograms/min) on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced alterations in sulfate renal clearance. Although PGE2 alone did not significantly alter the renal clearance of inorganic sulfate or that of creatinine, the PGE2 infusion abolished the effects of IBU on sulfate renal clearance. Concomitant PGE2 administration also significantly increased the sulfate reabsorption rate in INDO-treated animals; other parameters were not significantly changed, although the fractional reabsorption of sulfate tended to increase (P = 0.17). The reason for the less pronounced effect on PGE2 on the INDO-sulfate interaction is as yet unknown, but may be partly due to additional mechanisms involved in the INDO-induced alterations in sulfate clearance. The results of these studies suggest that prostaglandin inhibition represents one mechanism whereby IBU can alter the renal clearance of inorganic sulfate.
PubMedId: 1549620
Journal Article: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N.Y.), vol. 199, 1992
Authors: M. E. Morris, L. J. Benincosa
Journal-article: Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 199, pp. 410-416, 1992
Authors: I M Darling, M E Morris
Abstract: Homeostasis of inorganic sulfate is maintained by the capacity-limited renal reabsorption of sulfate in the proximal tubule. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if probenecid, the classical inhibitor of renal organic anion secretion, may affect sulfate renal clearance. Two groups of rats were administered in a randomized crossover design, an i.v. bolus dose (20.6 or 92.4 mg/kg) and 4-hr infusion (0.28 or 0.59 mg/min/kg) of probenecid or vehicle, and blood and urine samples were collected. At a steady-state serum concentration of 0.45 mM, probenecid had no significant effect on the serum concentrations or renal clearance of inorganic sulfate, whereas at a serum concentration of 1.4 mM, probenecid treatment caused a significant decrease in serum sulfate concentrations (0.57 +/- 0.11 vs 0.96 +/- 0.19 mM in controls, mean +/- SD, n = 6, P less than 0.001) due to an increase in the renal clearance of sulfate (3.88 +/- 1.18 vs 2.13 +/- 0.84 ml/min/kg in controls, P less than 0.01). The fraction of the filtered sulfate that was reabsorbed was significantly decreased (0.38 +/- 0.23, vs 0.74 +/- 0.09 in controls, P less than 0.01). Therefore, probenecid treatment results in the inhibition of the renal reabsorption of inorganic sulfate in rats in vivo.
PubMedId: 2052528
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 8, 1991
Authors: M E Morris, J P Freer, W A Watson
Abstract: The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the influence of chronic naproxen (500 mg twice daily) or sulindac (200 mg twice daily) therapy on the disposition of inorganic sulfate in arthritic subjects with impaired renal function. Subjects were studied during a control period (after a 7-day NSAID washout) and after 14 days of treatment with either naproxen or sulindac. During the control period subjects in this investigation exhibited higher serum sulfate concentrations and lower sulfate renal clearance values than reported for younger subjects with normal renal function. Treatment with either sulindac or naproxen significantly decreased creatinine clearance. Sulindac therapy also increased the serum sulfate concentration and decreased the clearance of sulfate; a similar trend was observed after naproxen therapy but the average change was smaller and not statistically significant. There were significant correlations between the creatinine and the sulfate clearances or serum concentrations. The glomerular filtration rate of inorganic sulfate was not altered by drug treatment and there was no impairment of reabsorption. The serum concentrations and renal clearance of other electrolytes (sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) were largely unaffected. Therefore, chronic treatment with naproxen or sulindac decreases the renal clearance of endogenous sulfate in humans: this appears to be a consequence of the decrement in renal function observed in subjects with preexisting mild renal impairment.
PubMedId: 2023875
Journal Article: Pharmaceutical research, vol. 8, 1991
Authors: M E Morris, S B Hansel
Abstract: p-Nitrophenol (pNP) and its conjugated metabolites, generated in a perfused rat liver preparation, are readily separated and quantitated in serum perfusate and bile samples using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method. Serum perfusate samples can be analyzed following protein precipitation with acetonitrile: following protein precipitation with 1.5 M perchloric acid (1 part to 2 parts serum) there was degradation of pNP sulfate to pNP when samples were stored at room temperature. pNP can also be analyzed in blood perfusate samples following extraction with a number of organic solvents including ethyl acetate or isobutanol-methylene chloride (4:1, v/v). Rat liver perfusions at a constant input concentration of 40 microM demonstrated a high hepatic extraction ratio of pNP (mean of 0.90) due to the formation of the sulfate and glucuronide conjugates; no pNP glucoside was detected in perfusate or bile samples.
PubMedId: 2084126
Journal Article: Journal of chromatography, vol. 532, 1990
Authors: M E Morris
PubMedId: 1981740
Journal Article: Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals, vol. 18, 1990
Authors: M E Morris, I M Darling
PubMedId: 2352169
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 79, 1990
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Steven B. Hansel
Journal-article: Journal of Chromatography B: Biomedical Sciences and Applications, vol. 532, pp. 285-293, 1990
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Inger M. Darling
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 79, pp. 458-459, 1990
Authors: M E Morris, I L Mansfield
PubMedId: 3225779
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 77, 1988
Authors: M E Morris, G Levy
Abstract: An assay using nonsuppressed (single-column) anion chromatography was developed to determine the concentration of inorganic sulfate in biologic fluids. A conventional HPLC system with an anion-exchange column and conductimetric detector interfaced with an automatic injector and integrator was used. The mobile phase for the chromatography of urine and serum samples is 4 mM potassium hydrogen phthalate, pH 4.5, and potassium iodide is used as the internal standard. For cerebrospinal fluid samples, the mobile phase is modified by addition of 10% of a 4 mM phthalic acid solution. Results of the HPLC assay were found to correlate well (r = 0.991 and 0.999) with those of two commonly used spectrophotometric methods for urine and serum inorganic sulfate determinations. However, the concentrations determined by ion chromatography were 2.5 to 10% lower, possibly due to less assay interference by other substances following chromatographic separation of sulfate. Anion chromatography using a single-column system is a convenient and relatively inexpensive method with sufficient sensitivity for the determination of inorganic sulfate concentrations in urine, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid.
PubMedId: 3189759
Journal Article: Analytical biochemistry, vol. 172, 1988
Authors: M E Morris, V Yuen, B K Tang, K S Pang
Abstract: Sulfation and glucuronidation are two parallel pathways for the metabolism of phenolic substrates. Gentisamide (GAM) was used as a model compound to examine the effects of parallel competing pathways on drug disappearance and metabolite formation in the once-through perfused rat liver preparation. GAM was found to form one glucuronide (GAM-5G) and two sulfate (GAM-2S and GAM-5S) conjugates. These GAM conjugates were biosynthesized in recirculating rat liver preparations, and were isolated by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate and [14C]glucose into GAM sulfate and glucuronide conjugates revealed corresponding elution patterns as labeled GAM metabolites. Their identities were characterized by enzymatic and acid hydrolyses and by NMR spectroscopy. Gentisamide-5-sulfate (GAM-5S) and gentisamide-5-glucuronide (GAM-5G) are major metabolites, and gentisamide-2-sulfate (GAM-2S) is a minor metabolite. Single-pass rat liver perfusions were used to examine the effect of stepwise increases/decreases of input GAM concentration (CIn) on the extraction ratio (E) of GAM and formation of metabolites. The E of GAM remained constant (about 0.89) at input concentrations from 0.9 to 120 microM and decreased at CIn greater than 120 microM. Metabolite patterns, however, changed with GAM CIn, even when E was constant at CIn up to 120 microM. GAM-5S was present as the major metabolite of GAM at all GAM CInS in most liver preparations but the proportions of GAM-5S and GAM-2S decreased at increasing CIn; the proportion of GAM-5G, a minor metabolite at low CIn, increased with increasing CIn. Biliary excretion rates at steady state accounted for 5.3 +/- 2.7% (mean +/- S.D.) of the input rate: GAM-5G was the predominant metabolite found. Fitting the metabolic data (sum of the rates of efflux in bile and perfusate at steady state) and the logarithmic average drug concentration at the various CIn to the Michaelis-Menten equation furnished parameter estimates for the three metabolic pathways. The estimated Km and Vmax values were quite comparable: for GAM-2S formation, 22 microM and 287 nmol/min; for GAM-5S formation, 26 microM and 978 nmol/min; for GAM-5G formation, 71 microM and 1062 nmol/min, indicating that sulfation and glucuronidation are effective competing pathways of each other. In viewing the fate of GAM over the CIn range, a changing metabolic fate of GAM over a constant E was noted at CIn less than 120 microM: the sum of the rates of metabolite formation was proportional to CIn.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMedId: 3367309
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 245, 1988
Authors: M E Morris, O Kwon, I L Mansfield
Abstract: Homeostasis of inorganic sulfate, a physiologic anion necessary for both detoxification and biosynthetic reactions, involves predominantly capacity-limited renal clearance mechanisms. The objective of this investigation was to examine the effect of salicylic acid (SA) and its major metabolites, salicyluric acid and salicyl phenolic glucuronide, on the serum concentrations and renal clearance of inorganic sulfate in rats. Animals were studied using a crossover design in which they received a bolus i.v. injection (75 mg/kg) and infusion (approximately 0.26 mg/min/kg) of SA or the same volume of saline (the vehicle). Blood samples were collected at 2, 3 and 4 hr after administration and urine between 2 and 4 hr. The renal clearance of sulfate and creatinine were examined at mean steady-state SA serum concentrations of 249 micrograms/ml. Although no changes in the serum concentrations and renal clearance of creatinine were observed, the renal clearance of inorganic sulfate was increased significantly (2.13 +/- 0.74 vs. 1.09 +/- 0.54 ml/min/kg in controls, mean +/- S.D., n = 7) and its serum concentration decreased (0.55 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.04 +/- 0.23 mM in controls). These changes were not due to alterations in uric acid concentrations as uric acid serum concentrations and renal clearance were unchanged when examined at similar steady-state SA serum concentrations in a subsequent study. The effects on sulfate disposition also were probably not due to the major metabolites of SA: no changes in the serum concentrations or renal clearance of sulfate were observed at mean steady-state concentrations of 52 micrograms/ml of salicyluric acid or 73.7 micrograms/ml of salicyl phenolic glucuronide after their direct administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMedId: 3252041
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 244, 1988
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Inger L. Mansfield
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 77, pp. 814-815, 1988
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Gerhard Levy
Journal-article: Analytical Biochemistry, vol. 172, pp. 16-21, 1988
Authors: M E Morris, K S Pang
Abstract: Modulating effects of competing pathways, exemplified by sulfation (high affinity-low capacity) and glucuronidation (low affinity-high capacity), on drug disappearance and metabolite formation were investigated in a simulation study. The phenomenon of substrate recruitment of hepatocyte activity in drug removal and metabolite formation was shown with respect to inlet substrate concentration, and drug processing from inlet to outlet by enzyme systems localized differentially along the sinusoidal flow path in liver. Three enzymic distribution models: (A) sulfation and glucuronidation evenly distributed in liver, (b) sulfation occurring exclusively in the first half of the liver and glucuronidation in the second half, and (C) glucuronidation solely in the first half and sulfation in the second half, were described. The influence of Km and Vmax of the competing pathway, including enzyme induction (increase in Vmax), on any given pathway was also explored. Competing pathways exert their effects on other given pathways by modulating intrahepatic drug concentration from the inlet to outlet of the liver. When a competing pathway is similarly distributed or is at an anterior location to another pathway, the former pathway effectively reduces intrahepatic drug concentrations which reach downstream hepatocytes for recruitment of activity. For example, when glucuronidation activity is anterior to sulfation activity (defined with respect to flow direction), sulfation is without an effect on glucuronidation, but glucuronidation exerts a maximal influence over sulfation rates (Model C). When glucuronidation is in direct competition with sulfation (Model A) or is posteriorly distributed to sulfation (Model B), saturation of the high-affinity sulfation pathway leads to greater fluxes of substrate available downstream for glucuronidation. This results in an apparent compensatory increase in glucuronidation with reduced sulfation capacity, which occurs at input concentrations greater than the Km for sulfation but less than the Km for glucuronidation. This compensation pattern is more prominent for highly extracted compounds where both sulfation and glucuronidation are effective pathways in drug removal, and where large intrahepatic drug concentration gradients are expected. Since the physiologic description of intrahepatic drug concentration is often described by a concentration gradient from the inlet to outlet of the liver, the logarithmic average concentration has been used to estimate the mean liver concentration in the determination of kinetic constants for enzymic reactions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMedId: 3694493
Journal Article: Journal of pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutics, vol. 15, 1987
Authors: M E Morris, S LeRoy, S C Sutton
Abstract: The use of magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) as a cathartic in patients with impaired renal function can lead to severe toxicity due to hypermagnesemia. Although toxicity is uncommon in healthy subjects, little is known concerning the extent of absorption of magnesium after a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate. The bioavailability of magnesium following a large oral dose of magnesium sulfate in normal volunteers was examined in the present investigation. Baseline 24-hour urinary excretion rates of magnesium and creatinine were determined over 3 consecutive days in 6 healthy men. The oral administration of 13.9 g (56.5 mmoles) magnesium sulfate U.S.P., in 4 equal hourly increments, resulted in the urinary excretion (corrected for baseline excretion rate) of 4.0 +/- 2.9% (mean +/- SD) of the dose of magnesium during the first 24 hours and 6.9 +/- 7.0% of the dose during a 72-hour interval. Magnesium sulfate administration had no effect on the 24-hour urinary excretion rate of creatinine. The baseline excretion rate of magnesium was significantly correlated with that of creatinine (r = 0.875) and inorganic sulfate (r = 0.921). All of the subjects experienced mild or moderate diarrhea. Therefore, magnesium is absorbed to a limited and variable extent in healthy adults following a cathartic dose of magnesium sulfate.
PubMedId: 3430654
Journal Article: Journal of toxicology. Clinical toxicology, vol. 25, 1987
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, K. Sandy Pang
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics, vol. 15, pp. 473-496, 1987
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Sheryl Leroy, Steven C. Sutton
Journal-article: Journal of Toxicology: Clinical Toxicology, vol. 25, pp. 371-382, 1987
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Francis M. Gengo, William R. Kinkel, Daniel A. Castellani, Gerhard Levy
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 75, pp. 722-723, 1986
Authors: M E Morris, G Levy
Abstract: Salicylamide (SAM) can produce sedation and sleep in humans and animals. To explore the potential utility of the drug as a research tool for assessing disease effects on the response of the central nervous system to depressant drugs, and to obtain a better understanding of the clinically evident sedative action of SAM, studies were performed to characterize the relationship between the concentrations and hypnotic effect of this drug in rats. Female Lewis rats weighing 170-200 g received SAM by intravenous infusion at a rate of 0.49, 1.22, or 2.47 mg/min until the onset of loss of the righting reflex. This well-defined pharmacological endpoint occurred from 16.7 +/- 2.3 min (fastest infusion rate) to 110 +/- 27 min (slowest infusion rate) after the start of the infusion. SAM concentrations at that time in serum, serum water, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were similar in animals that had received the 1.22- or 2.47-mg/min infusion and lower in animals that were infused at a rate of 0.49 mg/min. The slowest infusion rate group also exhibited increased serum protein binding of the drug. The SAM concentration ratio, CSF-serum water, was essentially unity in all three groups, indicative of rapid equilibration of the drug across the blood-CSF barrier. Gentisamide, the hydroxylated metabolite of SAM, was found in serum, CSF, and brain, but in low concentrations at which this metabolite alone had no hypnotic effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMedId: 4020644
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 74, 1985
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Gerhard Levy
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 74, pp. 599-602, 1985
Authors: M E Morris, G Levy
Abstract: The renal clearances of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide, and acetaminophen sulfate were determined in eight healthy adults 2 h after administration of 1.5 g of acetaminophen. The renal clearance ratios (relative to creatinine) were 0.058 +/- 0.026, 0.890 +/- 0.153, and 1.43 +/- 0.250 (mean +/- SD), respectively. The renal clearance of acetaminophen increased with increasing urine flow rate, and that of acetaminophen sulfate decreased with increasing serum concentration of the conjugate. A strong positive correlation was found between the renal clearances of acetaminophen glucuronide and acetaminophen sulfate, possibly due to blood perfusion rate-dependent renal tubular secretion of the two conjugates. The serum protein binding of acetaminophen (congruent to 20%) and acetaminophen glucuronide (less than 10%) are minor. Acetaminophen sulfate is greater than 50% protein bound, as determined by equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration. The results of these studies are (a) consistent with previous reports of animal studies, indicating that renal excretion of acetaminophen involves glomerular filtration and passive reabsorption and that acetaminophen sulfate is subject to active renal tubular secretion, and (b) compatible with the reported occurrence of renal tubular secretion of acetaminophen glucuronide in animals.
PubMedId: 6491906
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 73, 1984
Authors: M E Morris, R E Galinsky, G Levy
PubMedId: 6610741
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 73, 1984
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Gerhard Levyx
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 73, pp. 1038-1041, 1984
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Raymond E. Galinsky, Gerhard Levy
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 73, pp. 853, 1984
Authors: M E Morris, G Levy
PubMedId: 6875841
Journal Article: Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, vol. 72, 1983
Authors: M E Morris, G Levy
Abstract: Depletion of endogenous inorganic sulfate can have pronounced effects on the elimination kinetics and metabolic fate of phenolic drugs. Our purpose was to determine the effects of acetaminophen (which is partly metabolized to acetaminophen sulfate), ascorbic acid (subject to more limited sulfation than acetaminophen), and sodium sulfate (useful for sulfate repletion by the oral route) on the serum concentration and renal excretion of inorganic sulfate in healthy adults. Six men and two women, 26 to 35 yr old, were studied on four occasions that were at least 4 days apart. They received no medication, 1.5 gm acetaminophen, 6 gm ascorbic acid, or 9 gm sodium sulfate decahydrate orally, in aqueous solution. A blood sample was obtained 2 hr later and urine was collected from 1 to 3 hr. Serum inorganic sulfate concentrations (mean +/- SD), 0.410 +/- 0.043 mM in the control period, were decreased after acetaminophen (0.311 +/- 0.043 mM, P less than 0.001), increased after sodium sulfate (0.513 +/- 0.055 mM, P less than 0.001), and apparently unchanged after ascorbic acid (0.417 +/- 0.059 mM). The urinary excretion of inorganic sulfate was decreased after acetaminophen and increased after sodium sulfate. The renal clearance of endogenous creatinine was not affected by any of the treatments. The renal tubular reabsorption of inorganic sulfate is capacity limited, as evidenced by the decrease of the reabsorbed fraction with increasing glomerular filtration rate of the anion (r = -0.54, P less than 0.005). This saturable reabsorption facilitates sulfate homeostasis.
PubMedId: 6831833
Journal Article: Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, vol. 33, 1983
Authors: M E Morris, G Levy
Abstract: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the suitability of orally administered magnesium sulfate as a source of inorganic sulfate for counteracting the systemic depletion of sulfate caused by large doses of acetaminophen and certain other drugs that are metabolized to sulfate conjugates. Oral administration of 13.9 g magnesium sulfate U.S.P., in 4 equal hourly increments, to seven healthy men resulted in the urinary excretion (corrected for baseline excretion rate) of an amount of inorganic sulfate equivalent to 30.2 +/- 17.2 percent (mean +/- SD) of the dose during the first 24 hours. Excretion during the subsequent 48 hours was negligible. Six of the subjects experienced loose stools or diarrhea. Compared to sodium sulfate, magnesium sulfate appears to be absorbed less completely and more erratically, and to produce more adverse effects.
PubMedId: 6887305
Journal Article: Journal of toxicology. Clinical toxicology, vol. 20, 1983
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Gerhard Levy
Journal-article: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 72, pp. 715-716, 1983
Authors: Marilyn E Morris, Gerhard Levy
Journal-article: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 33, pp. 529-536, 1983
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris, Gerhard Levy
Journal-article: Journal of Toxicology: Clinical Toxicology, vol. 20, pp. 107-114, 1983
Authors: M E Morris
PubMedId: 36757
Journal Article: The American journal of nursing, vol. 79, 1979
Authors: W A Parker, M E Morris, C A Shearer
PubMedId: 433936
Journal Article: American journal of hospital pharmacy, vol. 36, 1979
Authors: Marilyn E. Morris
Journal-article: The American Journal of Nursing, vol. 79, pp. 1288, 1979
Authors: M E Morris
Abstract: The compatibility and stability of diazepam injection were studied following dilution to 10 different concentrations in dextrose 5% in water, normal saline, Ringer's injection and lactated Ringer's injection. Prepared solutions were examined for clarity and pH throughout a 24-hour period. Clear solutions were filtered and then assayed 24 hours after preparation using UV spectrophotometry. Solutions which formed visible precipitates before 24 hours or which did not demonstrate acceptable potency (greater than or equal to 90%) were assayed after shorter time periods. Dilutions lower than 1:20 (5 mg in 20 ml) resulted in immediate visible precipitates in all four diluents. The 1:20 dilution was compatible with all four diluents and maintained acceptable potency for four hours, whereas at 1:40 dilution (5 mg in 40 ml) diazepam was stable for at least 6-8 hours in the same diluents. At higher dilutions of 1:50, 1:75 and 1:100 (5 mg in 50, 75 and 100 ml, respectively) the injection was compatible with and stable in all four diluents for 24 hours. Further studies are required before the use of diazepam injection as an infusion can be recommended. However, if in some circumstances it is necessary to administer diazepam as an infusion, it is recommended that it be diluted in dextrose 5% in water, normal saline, Ringer's injection or lactated Ringer's injection to a dilution of at least 1:40 and used within 6 hours or to a dilution of 1:50 and used within 24 hours.
PubMedId: 665679
Journal Article: American journal of hospital pharmacy, vol. 35, 1978
Authors: Guofeng You, Marilyn E. Morris
Book-chapter: Drug Transporters, pp. 1-10,
Authors: Xiaodong Wang, Marilyn E. Morris
Book-chapter: Drug Transporters, pp. 665-708,
Presented by CUBS © 2022