UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Margarita L. Dubocovich UB Profile
Pharmacology and Toxicology
SUNY Distinguished Professor
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion
955 Main Street
Buffalo NY 14203-1121
716-829-3048
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Jiabei Liu, Shannon J. Clough, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Genes, Brain and Behavior, 2017
Authors: O. Rawashdeh, S. J. Clough, R. L. Hudson, M. L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: The FASEB Journal, 2016
Authors: Shannon J. Clough, Anthony J. Hutchinson, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Book-chapter: Neuropathology of Drug Addictions and Substance Misuse, pp. 169-180, 2016
Authors: Katherine M. Evely, Randall L. Hudson, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Samir Haj-dahmane
Journal-article: Synapse, vol. 70, pp. 181-186, 2016
Authors: Marina Popovska-Gorevski, Margarita L Dubocovich, Rajendram V Rajnarayanan
Abstract: Carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) and carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate) are among the most toxic insecticides, implicated in a variety of diseases including diabetes and cancer among others. Using an integrated pharmacoinformatics based screening approach, we have identified these insecticides to be structural mimics of the neurohormone melatonin and were able to bind to the putative melatonin binding sites in MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in silico. Carbaryl and carbofuran then were tested for competition with 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin (300 pM) binding to hMT1 or hMT2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells. Carbaryl and carbofuran showed higher affinity for competition with 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin binding to the hMT2 compared to the hMT1 melatonin receptor (33 and 35-fold difference, respectively) as predicted by the molecular modeling. In the presence of GTP (100 M), which decouples the G-protein linked receptors to modulate signaling, the apparent efficacy of carbaryl and carbofuran for 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin binding for the hMT1 melatonin receptor was not affected but significantly decreased for the hMT2 melatonin receptor compatible with receptor antagonist/inverse agonist and agonist efficacy, respectively. Altogether, our data points to a potentially new mechanism through which carbamate insecticides carbaryl and carbofuran could impact human health by altering the homeostatic balance of key regulatory processes by directly binding to melatonin receptors.
PubMedId: 28027439
Journal-article: Chemical research in toxicology, vol. 30, 2016
Authors: Jiabei Liu, Shannon J Clough, Anthony J Hutchinson, Ekue B Adamah-Biassi, Marina Popovska-Gorevski, Margarita L Dubocovich
Keywords: cancer circadian rhythm disorders depression drugs of abuse neuroprotection sleep disorders
Abstract: Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein-coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents.
PubMedId: 26514204
Journal-article: Annual review of pharmacology and toxicology, vol. 56, 2015
Authors: E B Adamah-Biassi, R L Hudson, M L Dubocovich
Keywords: Behavioral rhythms C57BL/6 mouse Estrous cycle Homecage MT(1) receptor deletion
Abstract: Behaviors vary over the 24h light/dark cycle and these temporal patterns reflect in part modulation by circadian neural circuits and hormones, such as melatonin. The goal of this study was to investigate the involvement of MT1 melatonin receptors in behavioral regulation by comparing male and female C57 wild type (WT) mice with C57 mice with genetic deletion of the MT1 receptor (MT1KO). A comprehensive array of fifteen distinct spontaneous behaviors was recorded continuously in the homecage over multiple days using the HomeCageScan system. Behaviors assessed were activity-like (i.e. come down, hang, jump, walk), exploration-like (i.e. dig, groom, rear up, sniff, stretch), resting-like (i.e. awake, remain low, rest, twitch) and ingestion-like (i.e. drink, eat). Phenotypic array and temporal distribution analysis revealed distinct behavioral rhythms that differed between WT and MT1KO mice. The rhythms were consistent from day to day in males and varied with the estrous cycle in females. We also studied the role of MT1 receptors on depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Genetic deletion of MT1 receptors increased immobility time in the forced swim test and decreased the number of marbles buried in the marble burying test in both male and female C57 mice. We conclude that MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in neural pathways modulating diurnal rhythms of spontaneous behavior in the homecage as well as pathways regulating depressive and anxiolytic-like behaviors.
PubMedId: 25200199
Journal-article: Hormones and behavior, vol. 66, 2014
Authors: Shannon J Clough, Anthony J Hutchinson, Randall L Hudson, Margarita L Dubocovich
Keywords: C3H/HeN mouse Conditioned place preference MT(1) or MT(2) knockout mice Melatonin Melatonin receptors
Abstract: The drug of abuse methamphetamine (METH) is known for its ability to enhance reward responses. The rewarding properties of psychostimulants have been shown to vary across time of day in mice. The goal of this study was to determine the role of the MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors in METH-induced reward, as measured by the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm during the light and dark phases. C3H/HeN wild-type mice were trained for METH-induced CPP at either ZT 6-8 (ZT: Zeitgeber time; ZT 0=lights on), when endogenous melatonin levels are low, or ZT 19-21, when melatonin levels are high. These time points also correspond to the high and low points for expression of the circadian gene Period1, respectively. The locomotor response to METH (1.2mg/kg, ip) treatment was of similar magnitude at both times; however only C3H/HeN mice conditioned to METH at ZT 6-8 developed a place preference. C3H/HeN mice with a genetic deletion of either the MT1 (MT1KO) or MT2 (MT2KO) receptor tested at ZT 6-8 or ZT 19-21 did not develop a place preference for METH, though both showed a similar increase in locomotor activity following METH treatment when compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that in our mouse model METH-induced CPP is dependent on time of day and the presence of the MT1 or MT2 receptors, suggesting a role for melatonin in METH-induced reward.
PubMedId: 24813704
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 132, 2013
Authors: Oliver Rawashdeh, Margarita L Dubocovich
Keywords: adverse rearing circadian rhythms depression early stress melatonin rhesus monkey
Abstract: Depression is often linked to early-life adversity and circadian disturbances. Here, we assessed the long-term impact of early-life adversity, particularly preweaning mother-infant separation, on the circadian system's responsiveness to a time giver or synchronizer (Zeitgeber). Mother-reared (MR) and peer-reared (PR) rhesus monkeys were subjected to chronic jet-lag, a forced desynchrony protocol of 22 hr T-cycles [11:11 hr light:dark (LD) cycles] to destabilize the central circadian organization. MR and PR monkeys subjected to the T-cycles showed split locomotor activity rhythms with periods of ~22 hr (entrained) and ~24 hr (free-running), simultaneously. Continuous melatonin treatment in the drinking water (20 g/mL) gradually increased the amplitude of the entrained rhythm at the expense of the free-running rhythm, reaching complete entrainment by 1 wk. Upon release into constant dim light, a rearing effect on anticipation for both the predicted light onset and food presentation was observed. In MR monkeys, melatonin did not affect the amplitude of anticipatory behavior. Interestingly, however, PR macaques showed light onset and food anticipatory activities in response to melatonin treatment. These results demonstrate for the first time a rearing-dependent effect of maternal separation in macaques, imprinting long-term plastic changes on the circadian system well into late adulthood. These effects could be counteracted by the synchronizer molecule melatonin. We conclude that the melatonergic system is targeted by early-life adversity of maternal separation and that melatonin supplementation ameliorates the negative impact of stress on the circadian system.
PubMedId: 24446898
Journal-article: Journal of pineal research, vol. 56, 2013
Authors: E B Adamah-Biassi, Y Zhang, H Jung, S Vissapragada, R J Miller, M l Dubocovich
Keywords: C3H/HeN mice MT1 melatonin receptors RFP-MT1 promoter expression
Abstract: The pineal hormone melatonin activates two G-protein coupled receptors (MT1 and MT2) to regulate in part biological functions. The MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors are heterogeneously distributed in the mammalian brain including humans. In the mouse, only a few reports have assessed the expression of the MT1 melatonin receptor expression using 2-iodomelatonin binding, in situ hybridization and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here, we described a transgenic mouse in which red fluorescence protein (RFP) is expressed under the control of the endogenous MT1 promoter, by inserting RFP cDNA at the start codon of MTNR1a gene within a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and expressing this construct as a transgene. The expression of RFP in the brain of this mouse was examined either directly under a fluorescent microscope or immunohistochemically using an antibody against RFP (RFP-MT1). RFP-MT1 expression was observed in many brain regions including the subcommissural organ, parts of the ependyma lining the lateral and third ventricles, the aqueduct, the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the pars tuberalis, the habenula and the habenula commissure. This RFP-MT1 transgenic model provides a unique tool for studying the distribution of the MT1 receptor in the brain of mice, its cell-specific expression and its function in vivo.
PubMedId: 24051358
Journal-article: The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society, vol. 62, 2013
Authors: Anthony J Hutchinson, Jason Ma, Jiabei Liu, Randall L Hudson, Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: Melatonin modifies physiological and behavioral responses to psychostimulants, with the MT and MT melatonin receptors specifically implicated in facilitating methamphetamine (METH)-induced sensitization in melatonin-proficient mice. The objective of the study is to assess differences in locomotor sensitization after a single dose of methamphetamine in low-melatonin-expressing C57BL/6 wild-type and MT receptor knockout (MTKO) mice, comparing with melatonin-expressing C3H/HeN mice. Mice received a vehicle or methamphetamine (1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment (day 1) during the light (ZT5-9) or dark (ZT 19-21) periods in novel test arenas. Locomotor sensitization was assessed by methamphetamine challenge after an eight-day abstinence (day 9). TH protein expression was evaluated by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Methamphetamine pretreatment induced statistically significant locomotor sensitization upon challenge after eight-day abstinence in C3H and C57 wild-type mice during the light period. The magnitude of sensitization in C57 mice was diminished in the dark period and completely abrogated in MTKO mice. No differences were observed in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the mesolimbic dopamine system. Additional exposures to the test arenas after methamphetamine pretreatment (nights 2-6) enhanced sensitization. Deletion of the MT melatonin receptor abolishes sensitization induced by a single METH pretreatment. The magnitude of sensitization is also altered by time of day and contextual cues. We conclude that the MT melatonin receptor is emerging as a novel target of therapeutic intervention for drug abuse disorders.
PubMedId: 23934259
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 231, 2012
Authors: Jiabei Liu, Kathleen C Somera-Molina, Randall L Hudson, Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: This study assessed the role of melatonin in modulating running wheel(RW)-induced hippocampal neurogenesis in adult C3H/HeN mice. Chronic melatonin (0.02mg/mL, oral for 12days) treatment did not affect cell proliferation or cell survival determined by the number of BrdU-positive cells in dentate gyrus of mice with access to fixed wheel (FW). RW activity significantly increased cell proliferation [RW (n=8) versus FW (n=6): dorsal, 19918 versus 12512, P<0.01; ventral, 21115 versus 12313, P<0.01] and newborn cell survival [RW (n=7) versus FW (n=8): dorsal, 458.5 versus 151.8, P<0.01; ventral, 488.1 versus 151.4)] in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus. Oral melatonin treatment further potentiated RW activity-induced cell survival in both areas of the dentate gyrus [melatonin (n=10) versus vehicle (n=7): dorsal, 635.4 versus 458.5 P<0.05; ventral, 757.9 versus 488.1, P<0.01] and neurogenesis [melatonin (n=8) versus vehicle (n=8): dorsal, 463.4, versus 344.5, P<0.05; ventral, 413.4 versus 252.4, P<0.01]. We conclude that melatonin potentiates RW-induced hippocampal neurogenesis by enhancing neuronal survival suggesting that the combination of physical exercise and melatonin may be an effective treatment for diseases affecting the hippocampus neurogenesis.
PubMedId: 23190173
Journal-article: Journal of pineal research, vol. 54, 2012
Authors: E B Adamah-Biassi, I Stepien, R L Hudson, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: Advances in rodent behavior dissection using automated video recording and analysis allows detailed phenotyping. This study compared and contrasted 15 diurnal behaviors recorded continuously using an automated behavioral analysis system for a period of 14 days under a 14/10 light/dark cycle in single housed C3H/HeN (C3H) or C57BL/6 (C57) male mice. Diurnal behaviors, recorded with minimal experimental interference and analyzed using phenotypic array and temporal distribution analysis showed bimodal and unimodal profiles in the C57 and C3H mice, respectively. Phenotypic array analysis revealed distinct behavioral rhythms in Activity-Like Behaviors (i.e. walk, hang, jump, come down) (ALB), Exploration-Like Behaviors (i.e. dig, groom, rear up, sniff, stretch) (ELB), Ingestion-Like Behaviors (i.e. drink, eat) (ILB) and Resting-Like Behaviors (i.e. awake, remain low, rest, twitch) (RLB) of C3H and C57 mice. Temporal distribution analysis demonstrated that strain and time of day affects the magnitude and distribution of the spontaneous homecage behaviors. Wheel running activity, water and food measurements correlated with timing of homecage behaviors. Subcutaneous (3 mg/kg, sc) or oral (0.02 mg/ml, oral) melatonin treatments in C57 mice did not modify either the total 24 h magnitude or temporal distribution of homecage behaviors when compared with vehicle treatments. We conclude that C3H and C57 mice show different spontaneous activity and behavioral rhythms specifically during the night period which are not modulated by melatonin.
PubMedId: 23337734
Journal-article: Behavioural brain research, vol. 243, 2012
Authors: Anthony J Hutchinson, Randall L Hudson, Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: This study explored the role of the melatonin receptors in methamphetamine (METH)-induced locomotor sensitization during the light and dark phases in C3H/HeN mice with genetic deletion of the MT(1) and/or MT(2) melatonin receptors. Six daily treatments with METH (1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) in a novel environment during the light phase led to the development of locomotor sensitization in wild-type (WT), MT(1)KO and MT(2)KO mice. Following four full days of abstinence, METH challenge (1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) triggered the expression of locomotor sensitization in METH-pretreated but not in vehicle (VEH)-pretreated mice. In MT(1)/MT(2)KO mice, the development of sensitization during the light phase was significantly reduced and the expression of sensitization was completely abrogated upon METH challenge. During the dark phase the development of locomotor sensitization in METH-pretreated WT, MT(1)KO and MT(2)KO mice was statistically different from VEH-treated controls. However, WT and MT(2)KO, but not MT(1)KO mice receiving repeated VEH pretreatments during the dark phase expressed a sensitized response to METH challenge that is of an identical magnitude to that observed upon 6 days of METH pretreatment. We conclude that exposure to a novel environment during the dark phase, but not during the light phase, facilitated the expression of sensitization to a METH challenge in a manner dependent on MT(1) melatonin receptor activation by endogenous melatonin. We suggest that MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors are potential targets for pharmacotherapeutic intervention in METH abusers.
PubMedId: 22672659
Journal-article: Journal of pineal research, vol. 53, 2012
Authors: Oliver Rawashdeh, Randall L Hudson, Iwona Stepien, Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: Ramelteon, an MT(1)/MT(2) melatonin receptor agonist, is used for the treatment of sleep-onset insomnia and circadian sleep disorders. Ramelteon phase shifts circadian rhythms in rodents and humans when given at the end of the subjective day; however, its efficacy at other circadian times is not known. Here, the authors determined in C3H/HeN mice the maximal circadian sensitivity for ramelteon in vivo on the onset of circadian running-wheel activity rhythms, and in vitro on the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) brain slices. The phase response curve (PRC) for ramelteon (90g/mouse, subcutaneous [sc]) on circadian wheel-activity rhythms shows maximal sensitivity during the late mid to end of the subjective day, between CT8 and CT12 (phase advance), and late subjective night and early subjective day, between CT20 and CT2 (phase delay), using a 3-day-pulse treatment regimen in C3H/HeN mice. The PRC for ramelteon resembles that for melatonin in C3H/HeN mice, showing the same magnitude of maximal shifts at CT10 and CT2, except that the range of sensitivity for ramelteon (CT8-CT12) during the subjective day is broader. Furthermore, in SCN brain slices in vitro, ramelteon (10 pM) administered at CT10 phase advances (5.60.29h, n=3) and at CT2 phase delays (-3.20.12h, n=6) the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing, with the shifts being significantly larger than those induced by melatonin (10 pM) at the same circadian times (CT10: 2.70.15h, n=4, p<.05; CT2: -1.130.08h, n=6, p<.001, respectively). The phase shifts induced by both melatonin and ramelteon in the SCN brain slice at either CT10 or CT2 corresponded with the period of sensitivity observed in vivo. In conclusion, melatonin and ramelteon showed identical periods of circadian sensitivity at CT10 (advance) and CT2 (delay) to shift the onset of circadian activity rhythms in vivo and the peak of SCN neuronal firing rhythms in vitro.
PubMedId: 21182402
Journal-article: Chronobiology international, vol. 28, 2010
Authors: Margarita L Dubocovich, Philippe Delagrange, Diana N Krause, David Sugden, Daniel P Cardinali, James Olcese
Abstract: The hormone melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine) is synthesized primarily in the pineal gland and retina, and in several peripheral tissues and organs. In the circulation, the concentration of melatonin follows a circadian rhythm, with high levels at night providing timing cues to target tissues endowed with melatonin receptors. Melatonin receptors receive and translate melatonin's message to influence daily and seasonal rhythms of physiology and behavior. The melatonin message is translated through activation of two G protein-coupled receptors, MT(1) and MT(2), that are potential therapeutic targets in disorders ranging from insomnia and circadian sleep disorders to depression, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. This review summarizes the steps taken since melatonin's discovery by Aaron Lerner in 1958 to functionally characterize, clone, and localize receptors in mammalian tissues. The pharmacological and molecular properties of the receptors are described as well as current efforts to discover and develop ligands for treatment of a number of illnesses, including sleep disorders, depression, and cancer.
PubMedId: 20605968
Journal-article: Pharmacological reviews, vol. 62, 2010
Authors: Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: The circadian release of the hormone melatonin is regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which feeds back into the nucleus to modulate sleep and circadian phase through activation of the MT(1) and/or MT(2) melatonin receptors. Considering the functions of the SCN as a sleep and circadian rhythm regulator, melatonin and melatonin receptor agonists have attracted interest as being possible treatments for sleep and circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Part of this interest has centered on elucidating which melatonin receptors are targets for the regulation of these functions within the SCN. Two G-protein coupled melatonin receptors, the MT(1) and MT(2), inhibit neuronal activity and phase shift circadian firing rhythms in the SCN, respectively. Recent reports have uncovered possible interactions between the two types of receptors in the mammalian SCN, as well as the role of physiological and supraphysiological levels of melatonin on the molecular pharmacology and cellular changes of human and rodent melatonin receptors via desensitization and internalization mechanisms. These data outline the complexity of the interplay between melatonin and its receptors in the SCN and their corresponding roles in sleep and circadian regulation. Although further studies are necessary, a great deal of progress has been made toward understanding how melatonin and its agonists contribute to sleep and circadian phase changes, and how best to develop compounds that can target the functions of the SCN specifically and effectively.
PubMedId: 18032103
Journal-article: Sleep medicine, vol. 8 Suppl 3, 2007
Authors: Monica I Masana, Isabel C Sumaya, Michael Becker-Andre, Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: This study reports for the first time the effects of retinoid-related orphan receptors [RORbeta; receptor gene deletion RORbeta(C3H)(-/-)] in C3H/HeN mice on behavioral and circadian phenotypes. Pineal melatonin levels showed a robust diurnal rhythm with high levels at night in wild-type (+/+), heterozygous (+/-), and knockout (-/-) mice. The RORbeta(C3H)(-/-) mice displayed motor ("duck gait," hind paw clasping reflex) and olfactory deficits, and reduced anxiety and learned helplessness-related behaviors. Circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity in all genotypes showed entrainment to the light-dark (LD) cycle, and free running in constant dark, with RORbeta(C3H)(-/-) mice showing a significant increase in circadian period (tau). Melatonin administration (90 microg/mouse sc for 3 days) at circadian time (CT) 10 induced phase advances, while exposure to a light pulse (300 lux) at CT 14 induced phase delays of circadian activity rhythms of the same magnitude in all genotypes. In RORbeta(C3H)(-/-) mice a light pulse at CT 22 elicited a larger phase advance in activity rhythms and a slower rate of reentrainment after a 6-h advance in the LD cycle compared with (+/+) mice. Yet, the rate of reentrainment was significantly advanced by melatonin administration at the new dark onset in both (+/+) and (-/-) mice. We conclude that the RORbeta nuclear receptor is not involved in either the rhythmic production of pineal melatonin or in mediating phase shifts of circadian rhythms by melatonin, but it may regulate clock responses to photic stimuli at certain time domains.
PubMedId: 17303680
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology, vol. 292, 2007
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich
Reference-entry: Handbook of Contemporary Neuropharmacology, 2007
Authors: Margarita L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 16869122
Journal Article: Current opinion in investigational drugs (London, England : 2000), vol. 7, 2006
Authors: David E Blask, George C Brainard, Robert T Dauchy, John P Hanifin, Leslie K Davidson, Jean A Krause, Leonard A Sauer, Moises A Rivera-Bermudez, Margarita L Dubocovich, Samar A Jasser, Darin T Lynch, Mark D Rollag, Frederick Zalatan
Abstract: The increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers has been postulated to result from the suppression of pineal melatonin production by exposure to light at night. Exposure of rats bearing rat hepatomas or human breast cancer xenografts to increasing intensities of white fluorescent light during each 12-hour dark phase (0-345 microW/cm2) resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of nocturnal melatonin blood levels and a stimulation of tumor growth and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism to the mitogenic molecule 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid. Venous blood samples were collected from healthy, premenopausal female volunteers during either the daytime, nighttime, or nighttime following 90 minutes of ocular bright, white fluorescent light exposure at 580 microW/cm2 (i.e., 2,800 lx). Compared with tumors perfused with daytime-collected melatonin-deficient blood, human breast cancer xenografts and rat hepatomas perfused in situ, with nocturnal, physiologically melatonin-rich blood collected during the night, exhibited markedly suppressed proliferative activity and linoleic acid uptake/metabolism. Tumors perfused with melatonin-deficient blood collected following ocular exposure to light at night exhibited the daytime pattern of high tumor proliferative activity. These results are the first to show that the tumor growth response to exposure to light during darkness is intensity dependent and that the human nocturnal, circadian melatonin signal not only inhibits human breast cancer growth but that this effect is extinguished by short-term ocular exposure to bright, white light at night. These mechanistic studies are the first to provide a rational biological explanation for the increased breast cancer risk in female night shift workers.
PubMedId: 16322268
Journal-article: Cancer research, vol. 65, 2005
Authors: I C Sumaya, M I Masana, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: We previously reported an antidepressant-like effect in C3H/HeN mice during the forced swimming test (FST) following treatment with the MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor ligand, luzindole. This study investigated the role melatonin receptors (MT1 and/or MT2) may play in the effect of luzindole in the FST using C3H/HeN mice with a genetic deletion of either MT1 (MT1KO) or MT2 (MT2KO) melatonin receptors. In the light phase (ZT 9-11), luzindole (30 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased immobility during swimming in both wild type (WT) (135.6 +/- 25.3 s, n = 7) and MT(1)KO (132.6 +/- 13.3 s, n = 8) as compared with vehicle-treated mice (WT: 207.1 +/- 6.0 s, n = 7; MT1KO: 209.5 +/- 6.2 s, n = 8) (P < 0.001). In the dark phase (ZT 20-22), luzindole also decreased time of immobility in both WT (89.5 +/- 13.9 s, n = 8) and MT1KO (66.5 +/- 6.4 s, n = 8) mice as compared with the vehicle treated (WT: 193.8 +/- 3.5, n = 6; MT1KO: 176.6 +/- 6.2 s, n = 8) (P < 0.001). Genetic disruption of the MT1 gene did not alter the diurnal rhythm of serum melatonin in MT1KO mice (ZT 9-11: 1.3 +/- 0.6 pg/mL, n = 7; ZT 20-22: 10.3 +/- 1.1 pg/mL, n = 8) as compared with WT (ZT 9-11: 1.4 +/- 0.7 pg/mL; ZT 20-22: 10.6 pg/mL). Swimming did not alter the serum melatonin diurnal rhythm in WT and MT1KO mice. Decreases in immobility of WT and MT1KO mice by luzindole treatment were not affected by gender or age (3 months versus 8 months). In contrast, luzindole did not decrease immobility during the FST in MT2KO mice. We conclude that the antidepressant-like effect of luzindole may be mediated through blockade of MT2 rather than MT1 melatonin receptors.
PubMedId: 16098095
Journal-article: Journal of pineal research, vol. 39, 2005
Authors: M L Dubocovich, R L Hudson, I C Sumaya, M I Masana, E Manna
Abstract: In the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), melatonin activates MT1 and MT2 G-protein coupled receptors, which are involved primarily in inhibition of neuronal firing and phase shift of circadian rhythms. This study investigated the ability of melatonin to phase shift circadian rhythms in wild type (WT) and MT1 melatonin receptor knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice. In WT mice, melatonin (90 microg/mouse, s.c.) administered at circadian time 10 (CT10; CT12 onset of activity) significantly phase advanced the onset of the circadian activity rhythm (0.60 +/- 0.09 hr, n = 41) when compared with vehicle treated controls (-0.02 +/- 0.07 hr, n = 28) (P < 0.001). In contrast, C57 MT1KO mice treated with melatonin did not phase shift circadian activity rhythms (-0.10 +/- 0.12 hr, n = 42) when compared with vehicle treated mice (-0.12 +/- 0.07 hr, n = 43). Similarly, in the C57 MT1KO mouse melatonin did not accelerate re-entrainment to a new dark onset after an abrupt advance of the dark cycle. In contrast, melatonin (3 and 10 pm) significantly phase advanced circadian rhythm of neuronal firing in SCN brain slices independent of genotype with an identical maximal shift at 10 pm (C57 WT: 3.61 +/- 0.38 hr, n = 3; C57 MT(1)KO: 3.45 +/- 0.11 hr, n = 4). Taken together, these results suggest that melatonin-mediated phase advances of circadian rhythms of neuronal firing in the SCN in vitro may involve activation of the MT2 receptor while in vivo activation of the MT1 and possibly the MT2 receptor may be necessary for the expression of melatonin-mediated phase shifts of overt circadian activity rhythms.
PubMedId: 16098087
Journal-article: Journal of pineal research, vol. 39, 2005
Authors: Margarita L Dubocovich, Magdalena Markowska
Abstract: Melatonin, dubbed the hormone of darkness, is known to regulate a wide variety of physiological processes in mammals. This review describes well-defined functional responses mediated through activation of high-affinity MT1 and MT2 G protein-coupled receptors viewed as potential targets for drug discovery. MT1 melatonin receptors modulate neuronal firing, arterial vasocon-striction, cell proliferation in cancer cells, and reproductive and metabolic functions. Activation of MT2 melatonin receptors phase shift circadian rhythms of neuronal firing in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, inhibit dopamine release in retina, induce vasodilation and inhibition of leukocyte rolling in arterial beds, and enhance immune responses. The melatonin-mediated responses elicited by activation of MT1 and MT2 native melatonin receptors are dependent on circadian time, duration and mode of exposure to endogenous or exogenous melatonin, and functional receptor sensitivity. Together, these studies underscore the importance of carefully linking each melatonin receptor type to specific functional responses in target tissues to facilitate the design and development of novel therapeutic agent.
PubMedId: 16217123
Journal-article: Endocrine, vol. 27, 2005
Authors: Martha Hansen, Imke Janssen, Adam Schiff, Phyllis C Zee, Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: This study was initiated to examine the impact of starting school on adolescent sleep, to compare weekday and weekend sleep times, and to attempt to normalize the timing of the circadian sleep/wake cycle by administering bright light in the morning. This was a collaborative project involving high school students and their parents, as well as high school and university faculty members, for the purpose of contributing information to the scientific community while educating students about research processes and their own sleep/wake cycles and patterns. Sixty incoming high school seniors kept sleep/wake diaries beginning in August and continuing through 2 weeks after the start of school in September. Sleep diaries were also kept for 1 month in November and 1 month in February. Early-morning light treatments were given to 19 students in the last 2 weeks of November and the last 2 weeks of February. Neuropsychologic performance was measured with computer-administered tests. Paper-and-pencil tests were used for assessment of mood and vigor. A testing period consisted of 2 consecutive days at the beginning and end of November and at the beginning and end of February. Tests were given 3 times per day, ie, in the morning before school (6:30-8:00 AM), during midday lunch periods (11:30 AM to 1:00 PM), and in the afternoon (3:00-4:30 PM), on each of the test days. Adolescents lost as much as 120 minutes of sleep per night during the week after the start of school, and weekend sleep time was also significantly longer (approximately 30 minutes) than that seen before the start of school (August). No significant differences were found between weekday sleep in the summer and weekend sleep during the school year. Early-morning light treatments did not modify total minutes of sleep per night, mood, or computer-administered vigilance test results. All students performed better in the afternoon than in the morning. Students in early morning classes reported being wearier, being less alert, and having to expend greater effort. The results of this study demonstrated that current high school start times contribute to sleep deprivation among adolescents. Consistent with a delay in circadian sleep phase, students performed better later in the day than in the early morning. However, exposure to bright light in the morning did not change the sleep/wake cycle or improve daytime performance during weekdays. Both short-term and long-term strategies that address the epidemic of sleep deprivation among adolescents will be necessary to improve health and maximize school performance.
PubMedId: 15930216
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 115, 2005
Authors: Monica I. Masana, Jose M. Soares Jr., Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Neuroendocrinology, vol. 81, pp. 87-95, 2005
Authors: Kavita Mundey, Susan Benloucif, Krisztina Harsanyi, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Phyllis C. Zee
Journal-article: Sleep, vol. 28, pp. 1271-1278, 2005
Authors: Kavita Mundey, Susan Benloucif, Krisztina Harsanyi, Margarita L Dubocovich, Phyllis C Zee
PubMedId: 16295212
Journal Article: Sleep, vol. 28, 2005
Authors: M. J. Gerdin, M. L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: J Pineal Res, vol. 37, pp. 142-142, 2004
Authors: Mois??s A. Rivera-Berm??dez, Monica I. Masana, Gregory M. Brown, David J. Earnest, Margarita L. Dubocovich
PubMedId: 14988029
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 1002, pp. 21-27, 2004
Authors: MATTHEW J. GERDIN, MONICA I. MASANA, MOIS??S A. RIVERA-BERM??DEZ, RANDALL L. HUDSON, DAVID J. EARNEST, MARTHA U. GILLETTE, MARGARITA L. DUBOCOVICH
PubMedId: 15522910
Journal-article: The FASEB Journal, vol. 18, pp. 1646-1656, 2004
Authors: Matthew J Gerdin, Monica I Masana, Margarita L Dubocovich
Abstract: In mammals, the pineal hormone melatonin activates G protein-coupled MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors. Acute exposure of recombinant MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors to supraphysiological concentrations of melatonin differentially regulates these two receptors with the MT(2), but not the MT(1), exhibiting rapid desensitization and internalization. In the present study, we sought to determine whether prolonged exposure to supraphysiological and physiological concentrations of melatonin desensitized and/or internalized the MT(1) melatonin receptor. Using a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line stably expressing MT(1)-FLAG or transiently expressing MT(1)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) melatonin receptors, we found that prolonged exposure (8h) to supraphysiological concentrations of melatonin (100 nM) significantly increased the number of MT(1) melatonin receptors and decreased the affinity (K(i)) of melatonin for competition for 2-[125]iodomelatonin. A similar treatment also desensitized the MT(1) melatonin receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding, but did not internalize the receptor. In contrast, prolonged exposure to a concentration of melatonin mimicking nocturnal levels (400 pM) did not affect the number of MT(1) melatonin receptors, the affinity for melatonin, or the functional sensitivity of the receptor. We conclude that in vivo endogenous melatonin does not significantly affect the functional sensitivity of MT(1) melatonin receptors, however, exogenous melatonin taken therapeutically at doses above physiological levels could desensitize the receptor thereby affecting physiological responses mediated following activation of MT(1) melatonin receptors.
PubMedId: 15135299
Journal-article: Biochemical pharmacology, vol. 67, 2003
Authors: M J Gerdin, M I Masana, D Ren, R J Miller, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: The hormone melatonin mediates a variety of physiological functions in mammals through activation of pharmacologically distinct MT(1) and MT(2) G protein-coupled melatonin receptors. We therefore sought to investigate how the receptors were regulated in response to short melatonin exposure. Using 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin binding, cAMP functional assays, and confocal microscopy, we demonstrated robust differences in specific 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin binding, receptor desensitization, and cellular trafficking of hMT(1) and hMT(2) melatonin receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells after short (10-min) exposure to melatonin. Exposure to melatonin decreased specific 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin binding to CHO-MT(2) cells (70.3 +/- 7.6%, n = 3) compared with vehicle controls. The robust decreases in specific binding to the hMT(2) melatonin receptors correlated both with the observed functional desensitization of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation in CHO-MT(2) cells pretreated with 10 nM melatonin (EC(50) of 159.8 +/- 17.8 nM, n = 3, p < 0.05) versus vehicle (EC(50) of 6.0 +/- 1.2 nM, n = 3), and with the arrestin-dependent internalization of the receptor. In contrast, short exposure of CHO-MT(1) cells to melatonin induced a small decrease in specific 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin binding (34.2 +/- 13.0%, n = 5) without either desensitization or receptor internalization. We conclude that differential regulation of the hMT(1) and hMT(2) melatonin receptors by the hormone melatonin could underlie temporally regulated signal transduction events mediated by the hormone in vivo.
PubMedId: 12604667
Journal-article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 304, 2003
Authors: Monica I. Masana, Paula A. Witt-Enderby, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Biochemical Pharmacology, vol. 65, pp. 731-739, 2003
Authors: Mois??s A. Rivera-Berm??dez, Matthew J. Gerdin, David J. Earnest, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Neuroscience Letters, vol. 346, pp. 37-40, 2003
Authors: Susan Benloucif, Monica I. Masana, Phyllis C. Zee, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 966, pp. 157-161, 2003
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich, Monica I. Masana
Book-chapter: Encyclopedia of Hormones, pp. 638-644, 2003
Authors: Matthew J Gerdin, Faika Mseeh, Margarita L Dubocovich
Journal-article: Biochemical Pharmacology, vol. 66, pp. 315-320, 2003
Authors: Margarita L Dubocovich
Journal-article: Frontiers in Bioscience, vol. 8, pp. d1093-1108, 2003
Authors: Margarita L Dubocovich, Moises A Rivera-Bermudez, Matthew J Gerdin, Monica I Masana
PubMedId: 12957828
Journal Article: Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library, vol. 8, 2003
Authors: Matthew J Gerdin, Faika Mseeh, Margarita L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 12826274
Journal Article: Biochemical pharmacology, vol. 66, 2003
Authors: Susan Benloucif, Monica I Masana, Phyllis C Zee, Margarita L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 12646319
Journal Article: Brain research, vol. 966, 2003
Authors: Monica I Masana, Paula A Witt-Enderby, Margarita L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 12628486
Journal Article: Biochemical pharmacology, vol. 65, 2003
Authors: Mois?s A Rivera-Berm?dez, Matthew J Gerdin, David J Earnest, Margarita L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 12850542
Journal Article: Neuroscience letters, vol. 346, 2003
Authors: ??a??atay Er??ahin, Monica I. Masana, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 439, pp. 171-172, 2002
Authors: M.I. Masana, S. Benloucif, M.L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Journal of Pineal Research, vol. 28, pp. 185-192, 2002
Authors: Faika Mseeh, Matthew J. Gerdin, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 449, pp. 29-38, 2002
Authors: Monica I Masana, Suzanne Doolen, Cagatay Ersahin, Walid M Al-Ghoul, Sue Piper Duckles, Margarita L Dubocovich, Diana N Krause
PubMedId: 12183692
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 302, 2002
Authors: Juliana S. Popova, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Journal of Neurochemistry, vol. 64, pp. 130-138, 2002
Authors: M I Masana, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: Melatonin, dubbed "the hormone of darkness," is involved in relaying photoperiodic information to the organism. Not only is melatonin involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep, but it also has roles in visual, cerebrovascular, reproductive, neuroendocrine, and neuroimmunological functions. Melatonin mediates its effects through G protein-coupled receptors: MT(1), MT(2), and, possibly, MT(3). Pharmacological agents have been instrumental in identifying these receptor types. Masana and Dubocovich discuss how the level of receptor expression may alter their efficacy, so that caution is necessary when extrapolating the pharmacological properties of ligands defined on recombinant systems to the receptors in the organism. With these cautions in mind, they describe the various signaling pathways and physiological roles ascribed to the three melatonin receptor types.
PubMedId: 11698691
Journal-article: Science's STKE : signal transduction knowledge environment, vol. 2001, 2001
Authors: M. I. Masana, M. L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Science Signaling, vol. 2001, pp. pe39-pe39, 2001
Authors: Celina M.C Lotufo, Cristiane Lopes, Margarita L Dubocovich, Sandra H.P Farsky, Regina P Markus
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 430, pp. 351-357, 2001
Authors: C M Lotufo, C Lopes, M L Dubocovich, S H Farsky, R P Markus
PubMedId: 11711054
Journal Article: European journal of pharmacology, vol. 430, 2001
Authors: Kathryn J. Reid, Anne-Marie Chang, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Fred W. Turek, Joseph S. Takahashi, Phyllis C. Zee
Journal-article: Archives of Neurology, vol. 58, pp. 1089, 2001
Authors: K J Reid, A M Chang, M L Dubocovich, F W Turek, J S Takahashi, P C Zee
PubMedId: 11448298
Journal Article: Archives of neurology, vol. 58, 2001
Authors: A E Hunt, W M Al-Ghoul, M U Gillette, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: The aim of this study was to identify the melatonin receptor type(s) (MT(1) or MT(2)) mediating circadian clock resetting by melatonin in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Quantitative receptor autoradiography with 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin and in situ hybridization histochemistry, with either (33)P- or digoxigenin-labeled antisense MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptor mRNA oligonucleotide probes, revealed specific expression of both melatonin receptor types in the SCN of inbred Long-Evans rats. The melatonin receptor type mediating phase advances of the circadian rhythm of neuronal firing rate in the SCN slice was assessed using competitive melatonin receptor antagonists, the MT(1)/MT(2) nonselective luzindole and the MT(2)-selective 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline (4P-PDOT). Luzindole and 4P-PDOT (1 nM-1 microM) did not affect circadian phase on their own; however, they blocked both the phase advances (approximately 4 h) in the neuronal firing rate induced by melatonin (3 pM) at temporally distinct times of day [i.e., subjective dusk, circadian time (CT) 10; and dawn, CT 23], as well as the associated increases in protein kinase C activity. We conclude that melatonin mediates phase advances of the SCN circadian clock at both dusk and dawn via activation of MT(2) melatonin receptor signaling.
PubMedId: 11121382
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Cell physiology, vol. 280, 2000
Authors: N F Ruby, M L Dubocovich, H C Heller
Abstract: Siberian hamsters readily reentrain to a 3-h phase delay of the photocycle (16 h light/day) but fail to reentrain to a 5-h phase delay. This study tested whether melatonin production was suppressed in animals that failed to reentrain. Melatonin was measured on the day before, day of, or several days after each phase shift. Melatonin levels measured 4 h after dark onset were approximately 83 microg/ml on the day before each phase delay and undetectable (<6 microg/ml) during the light phase on the day of the phase shift. Activity onsets regained their prior phase relationship to the photocycle 4 (3 h) or 5 (5 h) days after the phase shift; on that day, melatonin levels were measured 4 h after dark onset. Melatonin levels were unaffected by the 3-h phase delay (>57.6 microg/ml) but were undetectable after a 5-h phase delay (<8 microg/ml). Thus melatonin remained suppressed only after the phase delay to which hamsters also fail to reentrain. This relationship suggests that the propensity for reentrainment may be influenced by changes in melatonin production following a phase shift of the photocycle.
PubMedId: 10712298
Journal-article: American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology, vol. 278, 2000
Authors: M I Masana, S Benloucif, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 10739306
Journal Article: Journal of pineal research, vol. 28, 2000
Authors: M L Dubocovich, M I Masana, S Benloucif
PubMedId: 10810513
Journal Article: Advances in experimental medicine and biology, vol. 460, 2000
Authors: S Benloucif, M I Masana, K Yun, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: Melatonin and light synchronize the biological clock and are used to treat sleep/wake disturbances in humans. However, the two treatments affect circadian rhythms differently when they are combined than when they are administered individually. To elucidate the nature of the interaction between melatonin and light, the present study assessed the effect of melatonin on circadian timing and immediate-early gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) when administered in the presence of light. Male C3H/HeN mice, housed in constant dark in cages equipped with running wheels, were treated with either melatonin (90 microg, s.c.) or vehicle (3% ethanol-saline) 5 min prior to exposure to light (15 min, 300 lux) at various times in the circadian cycle. Combined treatment resulted in lower magnitude phase delays of circadian activity rhythms than those obtained with light alone during the early subjective night and advances in phase when melatonin and light were administered during the subjective day (p < .001). The reduction in phase delays with combined treatment at Circadian Time (CT) 14 was significant when light exposure measured 300 lux but not at lower light levels (p < .05). When light preceded melatonin administration, the inhibition of phase delays attained significance only when the light exposure reached 1000 lux (p < .05). Neither basal nor light-induced expression of c-fos mRNA in the SCN was modified by melatonin administration at CT 14 or CT 22. Together, these results suggest that combined administration of melatonin and light affect circadian timing in a manner not predicted by summing the two treatments given individually. Furthermore, the interaction is not likely to be due to inhibition of photic input to the clock by melatonin but might arise from a photically induced enhancement of melatonin's actions on circadian timing.
PubMedId: 10447308
Journal-article: Journal of biological rhythms, vol. 14, 1999
Authors: Susan Benloucif, Geoffrey L Bauer, Margarita L Dubocovich, Sanford I Finkel, Phyllis C Zee
Journal-article: Neuroscience Letters, vol. 272, pp. 67-71, 1999
Authors: S Benloucif, G L Bauer, M L Dubocovich, S I Finkel, P C Zee
PubMedId: 10507544
Journal Article: Neuroscience letters, vol. 272, 1999
Authors: W M Al-Ghoul, M D Herman, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 9926848
Journal Article: Neuroreport, vol. 9, 1999
Authors: P A Witt-Enderby, M I Masana, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: Here, we report the effects of short exposure to melatonin on the human mt1 (h mt1) melatonin receptor-mediated signaling in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and the consequences of an exposure that resembles the physiological pattern of melatonin release on cAMP-mediated signal transduction. Short exposure (10 min) of h mt1 melatonin receptors to melatonin (400 pM) inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein. However, treatment of mt1-CHO cells with melatonin in a manner that closely mimics the in vivo activation of melatonin receptors (i.e. 400 pM melatonin for 8 h to mimic darkness) resulted in a supersensitization of the cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade during the period of withdrawal (i.e. 16 h without melatonin to mimic the light cycle of a diurnal photoperiod). During the period of withdrawal, forskolin induced a time-dependent (1-16 h) increase in cAMP formation (approximately 200% of control cells). This effect of melatonin was dependent on the presence of the h mt1 melatonin receptor, as no potentiation of forskolin-induced cAMP formation was observed in CHO cells transfected only with the neomycin resistance plasmid. The time-dependent increase in forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels resulted in a potentiation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity 1 h after withdrawal (approximately 130% of control cells; P < 0.05) and in the number of cells containing the phosphorylated form of cAMP response element-binding protein (approximately 75% of cells at 1 and 16 h compared with 30% in control cells; P < 0.05). An increase in the undissociated state (G alphabetagamma) of Gi proteins may underlie this phenomenon as demonstrated by the increase in pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of G proteins (217 +/- 48% of control; P < 0.05) after melatonin withdrawal. This increase in the ribosylation was not due to an up-regulation of Galpha(i) protein, as no significant change in Galpha(i) protein levels occurred at this time. We demonstrated that activation of the h mt1 melatonin receptor in a manner that resembles the physiological pattern of melatonin exposure alters signaling, as potentiation of cAMP-mediated signal transduction events is observed after hormone withdrawal. The CHO cells expressing the human melatonin receptor may provide an in vitro cellular model in which to investigate the putative signaling mechanisms leading to gene regulation by melatonin.
PubMedId: 9645677
Journal-article: Endocrinology, vol. 139, 1998
Authors: Suzanne Doolen, Diana N Krause, Margarita L Dubocovich, Sue P Duckles
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 345, pp. 67-69, 1998
Authors: Walid M. Al-Ghoul, Martin D. Herman, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: NeuroReport, vol. 9, pp. 4063-4068, 1998
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich, Kenneth Yun, Walid M. Al-ghoul, Susan Benloucif, Monica I. Masana
Journal-article: The FASEB Journal, vol. 12, pp. 1211-1220, 1998
Authors: M L Dubocovich, K Yun, W M Al-Ghoul, S Benloucif, M I Masana
PubMedId: 9737724
Journal Article: FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, vol. 12, 1998
Authors: I J Beresford, C Browning, S J Starkey, J Brown, S M Foord, J Coughlan, P C North, M L Dubocovich, R M Hagan
PubMedId: 9618428
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 285, 1998
Authors: S Benloucif, M I Masana, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 9435637
Journal Article: The American journal of physiology, vol. 273, 1998
Authors: M. L. Dubocovich, Monica I. Masana, Stanca Iacob, Daniel M. Sauri
Journal-article: Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, vol. 355, pp. 365-375, 1997
Authors: Susan Benloucif, Monica I Masana, Margarita L Dubocovich
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 747, pp. 34-42, 1997
Authors: S Benloucif, M I Masana, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 9042525
Journal Article: Brain research, vol. 747, 1997
Authors: S Benloucif, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: This study examines the effect of light pulses and administration of the pineal hormone melatonin on the circadian activity rhythm of C3H/HeN mice. Mice were housed in constant dark in cages equipped with running wheels. Phase shifts in the circadian rhythm of wheel-running activity were measured following treatment with a 15-min pulse of light (300 lux) or administration of vehicle (ethanol/saline) or melatonin (90 micrograms, sc). Light treatment induced phase changes in circadian activity rhythms; specifically, delays during early subjective night (circadian time [CT] 12.5 to CT 18.5) and advances during late subjective night (CT 0.5). A single dose of melatonin administered at various CTs had no consistent effect on free-running circadian activity rhythms. By contrast, melatonin administration for 3 consecutive days at the same clock time induced advances in circadian activity rhythms by more than 1 h when the first dose was administered at CT 10 and induced delays in circadian activity rhythms by up to 1 h when the first dose was administered between CT 24 and CT 2. With the caveat that multi- ple melatonin treatments are required to induce phase shifts, the results suggest that the circadian timing system controlling the rhythm of wheel-running activity in the C3H/HeN mouse is responsive to both light and melatonin.
PubMedId: 8744239
Journal-article: Journal of biological rhythms, vol. 11, 1996
Authors: Eduardo J. Molinari, Peter C. North, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 301, pp. 159-168, 1996
Authors: M.I. Masana, S. Benloucif, M.L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Molecular Brain Research, vol. 42, pp. 193-201, 1996
Authors: Johanna M. Jansen, Swier Copinga, Gert Gruppen, Eduardo J. Molinari, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Cor J. Grol
Journal-article: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 4, pp. 1321-1332, 1996
Authors: M I Masana, S Benloucif, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 9013774
Journal Article: Brain research. Molecular brain research, vol. 42, 1996
Authors: J M Jansen, S Copinga, G Gruppen, E J Molinari, M L Dubocovich, C J Grol
PubMedId: 8879554
Journal Article: Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry, vol. 4, 1996
Authors: P A Witt-Enderby, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 8700109
Journal Article: Molecular pharmacology, vol. 50, 1996
Authors: Linda J. Larson-Prior, Judith A. Siuciak, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 297, pp. 181-185, 1996
Authors: L J Larson-Prior, J A Siuciak, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 8851181
Journal Article: European journal of pharmacology, vol. 297, 1996
Authors: M L Dubocovich, S Benloucif, M I Masana
PubMedId: 8788492
Journal Article: Behavioural brain research, vol. 73, 1996
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich, Susan Benloucif, Monica I. Masana
Journal-article: Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 73, pp. 141-147, 1995
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich, Diana N. Krause, Stanca Iacob, Susan Benloucif, Monica I. Masana
Book-chapter: The Pineal Gland and Its Hormones, pp. 61-74, 1995
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 7762083
Journal Article: Trends in pharmacological sciences, vol. 16, 1995
Authors: J S Popova, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 7798906
Journal Article: Journal of neurochemistry, vol. 64, 1995
Authors: M I Masana, R C Brown, H Pu, M E Gurney, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 8833998
Journal Article: Receptors & channels, vol. 3, 1995
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, vol. 16, pp. 50-56, 1995
Authors: D.N. Krause, J.A. Siuciak, M.L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 654, pp. 63-74, 1994
Authors: D N Krause, J A Siuciak, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 7982099
Journal Article: Brain research, vol. 654, 1994
Authors: S.F. Pang, M.L. Dubocovich, G.M. Brown
Journal-article: Neurosignals, vol. 2, pp. 177-180, 1993
Authors: Swier Copinga, Pieter G. Tepper, Cor J. Grol, Alan S. Horn, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: J. Med. Chem., vol. 36, pp. 2891-2898, 1993
Authors: Regina C.G. Carneiro, Regina P. Markus, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Neurosignals, vol. 2, pp. 199-206, 1993
Authors: R C Carneiro, R P Markus, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 8205163
Journal Article: Biological signals, vol. 2, 1993
Authors: R C Carneiro, R P Markus, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 8205162
Journal Article: Biological signals, vol. 2, 1993
Authors: S F Pang, M L Dubocovich, G M Brown
PubMedId: 8205160
Journal Article: Biological signals, vol. 2, 1993
Authors: Judith A. Siuciak, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, vol. 13, pp. 193-202, 1993
Authors: J A Siuciak, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 8242684
Journal Article: Cellular and molecular neurobiology, vol. 13, 1993
Authors: Diana N. Krause, Judith A. Siuciak, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 590, pp. 325-328, 1992
Authors: D N Krause, J A Siuciak, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 1422841
Journal Article: Brain research, vol. 590, 1992
Authors: Judith A. Siuciak, Paul H. Gamache, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Journal of Neurochemistry, vol. 58, pp. 722-729, 1992
Authors: J A Siuciak, P H Gamache, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 1729412
Journal Article: Journal of neurochemistry, vol. 58, 1992
Authors: D N Krause, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 1648339
Journal-article: Annual review of pharmacology and toxicology, vol. 31, 1991
Authors: Toni L. Stanton, Judith A. Siuciak, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Diana N. Krause
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 557, pp. 285-288, 1991
Authors: JA Siuciak, DN Krause, ML Dubocovich
Journal-article: The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 11, pp. 2855-2864, 1991
Authors: J A Siuciak, D N Krause, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 1652626
Journal Article: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, vol. 11, 1991
Authors: T L Stanton, J A Siuciak, M L Dubocovich, D N Krause
PubMedId: 1660755
Journal Article: Brain research, vol. 557, 1991
Authors: Christine Blazynski, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Journal of Neurochemistry, vol. 56, pp. 1873-1880, 1991
Authors: C Blazynski, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 2027005
Journal Article: Journal of neurochemistry, vol. 56, 1991
Authors: M. L. Dubocovich
Book-chapter: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, pp. 255-265, 1991
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 1663311
Journal Article: Advances in experimental medicine and biology, vol. 294, 1991
Authors: Diana N Krause, Margarita L Dubocovich
Journal-article: Trends in Neurosciences, vol. 13, pp. 464-470, 1990
Authors: M.L. Dubocovich, J.A. Siuciak, D.N. Krause
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 183, pp. 2180, 1990
Authors: D N Krause, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 1701580
Journal Article: Trends in neurosciences, vol. 13, 1990
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich, Ewa Mogilnicka, Pilar M. Areso
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 182, pp. 313-325, 1990
Authors: M L Dubocovich, E Mogilnicka, P M Areso
PubMedId: 2168835
Journal Article: European journal of pharmacology, vol. 182, 1990
Authors: Jun-Ming Fang, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Journal of Neurochemistry, vol. 55, pp. 76-82, 1990
Authors: J M Fang, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 2162381
Journal Article: Journal of neurochemistry, vol. 55, 1990
Authors: MARGARITA L. DUBOCOVICH
Journal-article: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 604, pp. 82-95, 1990
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 2171409
Journal Article: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 604, 1990
Authors: Marilyn J. Duncan, Jun-Ming Fang, Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Journal of Pineal Research, vol. 9, pp. 231-242, 1990
Authors: M J Duncan, J M Fang, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 1965726
Journal Article: Journal of pineal research, vol. 9, 1990
Authors: M J Duncan, J S Takahashi, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: These studies investigated the characteristics and regional distribution of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding in Djungarian hamster brain. The results showed that 2-[125I]iodomelatonin labels two types of binding sites, which resemble the ML-1 and ML-2 melatonin subtypes previously described in other tissues. The 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding site identified in whole brain membranes has a nanomolar affinity (Kd = 1.48 +/- 0.26 nM) and biochemical and pharmacological characteristics identical to those of the ML-2 site of Syrian hamster whole brain. The 2-[125I]iodomelatonin site in the hypothalamus has a picomolar affinity (Kd = 43.4 +/- 5.1 pM) and resembles the ML-1 site of chicken retina. The localization of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin labeling in autoradiographic studies of the Djungarian hamster brain includes the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the median eminence, the reuniens nucleus, and the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus.
PubMedId: 2752961
Journal-article: Endocrinology, vol. 125, 1989
Authors: Wia Timmerman, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Ben H.C. Westerink, Jan B. De Vries, Pieter G. Tepper, Alan S. Horn
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 166, pp. 1-11, 1989
Authors: W Timmerman, M L Dubocovich, B H Westerink, J B De Vries, P G Tepper, A S Horn
PubMedId: 2572424
Journal Article: European journal of pharmacology, vol. 166, 1989
Authors: M J Duncan, J S Takahashi, M L Dubocovich
Abstract: Studies in a variety of seasonally breeding mammals have shown that melatonin mediates photoperiodic effects on reproduction. Relatively little is known, however, about the site(s) or mechanisms of action of this hormone for inducing reproductive effects. Although binding sites for [3H]melatonin have been reported previously in bovine, rat, and hamster brain, the pharmacological selectivity of these sites was never demonstrated. In the present study, we have characterized binding sites for a new radioligand, 2-[125I]iodomelatonin, in brains from a photoperiodic species, the Syrian hamster. 2-[125I]Iodomelatonin labels a high affinity binding site in hamster brain membranes. Specific binding of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin is rapid, stable, saturable, and reversible. Saturation studies demonstrated that 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 3.3 +/- 0.5 nM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 110.2 +/- 13.4 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). The Kd value determined from kinetic analysis (3.1 +/- 0.9 nM; n = 5) was very similar to that obtained from saturation experiments. Competition experiments showed that the relative order of potency of a variety of indoles for inhibition of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding site to hamster brain membranes was as follows: 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to 2-iodomelatonin greater than N-acetylserotonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-dichloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 5-methoxytryptophol greater than 5-methoxytryptamine greater than or equal to 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than serotonin greater than 5-methoxyindole (inactive). Compounds known to act at serotonergic, adrenergic, or dopaminergic receptors were either inactive or relatively ineffective as compared to melatonin. These results suggest that 2-[125I]iodomelatonin is a selective, high affinity probe for identifying melatonin receptor binding sites in rodent brain.
PubMedId: 2834175
Journal-article: Endocrinology, vol. 122, 1988
Authors: Jan Van der Weide, Jan B. De Vries, Pieter G. Tepper, Diana N. Krause, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Alan S. Horn
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 147, pp. 249-258, 1988
Authors: Jan Van der Weide, Maartje E.C. Tendijck, Pieter G. Tepper, Jan B. De Vries, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Alan S. Horn
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 146, pp. 319-326, 1988
Authors: J M Watson, S M Vogel, D J Cotterell, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 2468508
Journal Article: European journal of pharmacology, vol. 155, 1988
Authors: M L Dubocovich
Journal-article: The FASEB Journal, vol. 2, pp. 2765-2773, 1988
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 2842214
Journal Article: FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, vol. 2, 1988
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 2843633
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 246, 1988
Authors: M. L. Dubocovich, J. S. Takahashi
Journal-article: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 84, pp. 3916-3920, 1987
Authors: M L Dubocovich, J S Takahashi
PubMedId: 3035559
Journal Article: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 84, 1987
Authors: J.G. Hensler, M.L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 398, pp. 407-412, 1986
Authors: J G Hensler, M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 2948615
Journal Article: Brain research, vol. 398, 1986
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich, Rita C. Lucas, Joseph S. Takahashi
Journal-article: Brain Research, vol. 335, pp. 321-325, 1985
Authors: M L Dubocovich, R C Lucas, J S Takahashi
PubMedId: 2988696
Journal Article: Brain research, vol. 335, 1985
Authors: B. Scatton, A. Dubois, M.L. Dubocovich, N.R. Zahniser, D. Fage
Journal-article: Life Sciences, vol. 36, pp. 815-822, 1985
Authors: B Scatton, A Dubois, M L Dubocovich, N R Zahniser, D Fage
PubMedId: 3974411
Journal Article: Life sciences, vol. 36, 1985
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 6468669
Journal Article: Federation proceedings, vol. 43, 1984
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 6086874
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 230, 1984
Authors: MARGARITA L. DUBOCOVICH
Journal-article: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 430, pp. 7-25, 1984
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 6146285
Journal Article: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 430, 1984
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich
Journal-article: Nature, vol. 306, pp. 782-784, 1983
Authors: M L Dubocovich
PubMedId: 6656879
Journal Article: Nature, vol. 306, 1983
Authors: S. Langer, C Moret, R Raisman, M. Dubocovich, M Briley
Journal-article: Science, vol. 210, pp. 1133-1135, 1980
Authors: S Z Langer, C Moret, R Raisman, M L Dubocovich, M Briley
PubMedId: 7444441
Journal Article: Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 210, 1980
Authors: MARGARITA L. DUBOCOVICH, S.Z. LANGER
Journal-article: British Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 70, pp. 383-393, 1980
Authors: M L Dubocovich, S Z Langer
PubMedId: 6254597
Journal Article: British journal of pharmacology, vol. 70, 1980
Authors: M L Dubocovich, S Z Langer
PubMedId: 6101339
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 212, 1980
Authors: R. Massingham, Margarita L. Dubocovich, S. Z. Langer
Journal-article: Clinical Science, vol. 57, pp. 185s-187s, 1979
Authors: R Massingham, M L Dubocovich, S Z Langer
PubMedId: 44230
Journal Article: Clinical science (London, England : 1979), vol. 57 Suppl 5, 1979
Authors: Jesus A. Garcia-Sevilla, Margarita L. Dubocovich, Salomon Z. Langer
Journal-article: European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 56, pp. 173-176, 1979
Authors: J A Garcia-Sevilla, M L Dubocovich, S Z Langer
PubMedId: 467506
Journal Article: European journal of pharmacology, vol. 56, 1979
Authors: STELLA M. CELUCH, MARGARITA L. DUBOCOVICH, S.Z. LANGER
Journal-article: British Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 63, pp. 97-109, 1978
Authors: S M Celuch, M L Dubocovich, S Z Lander
PubMedId: 206310
Journal Article: British journal of pharmacology, vol. 63, 1978
Authors: M L Dubocovich, S Z Langer
PubMedId: 933013
Journal Article: The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, vol. 198, 1976
Authors: Margarita L. Dubocovich, Monica I. Masana, Susan Benloucif
Book-chapter: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, pp. 181-190,
Presented by CUBS © 2022