UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Leonard H. Epstein UB Profile
Pediatrics
SUNY Distinguished Professor and Division Chief, Behavioral Medicine
University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Division of Behavioral Medicine
G56 Farber Hall, 3435 Main Street
Buffalo NY 14214
716-829-3400
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Mathew Biondolillo, Leonard Epstein
PubMedId: 31917605
1: Journal of personality assessment, 2020
Authors: Sara Tauriello, Julie Bowker, Gregory Wilding, Leonard Epstein, Stephanie Anzman-Frasca
PubMedId: 32548907
1: Pediatric obesity, vol. 15, 2020
Authors: Kerri N Boutelle, David Strong, June Liang, Kyung E Rhee, Cheryl L Rock, Denise Wilfley, Leonard Epstein, Scott J Crow
PubMedId: 33491321
1: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 29, 2019
Authors: Malena Savell, Rina Das Eiden, Kai Ling Kong, Sara Tauriello, Leonard Epstein, Gregory Fabiano, Kaley Reardon, Stephanie Anzman-Frasca
PubMedId: 32417301
1: Appetite, vol. 153, 2019
Authors: Teresa Quattrin, Ying Cao, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich, Michelle A Ecker, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 28842402
1: Pediatrics, vol. 140, 2017
Authors: Katelyn A. Carr, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Health Psychology, 2017
Authors: Kai Ling Kong, Rina D Eiden, Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, Corrin L Stier, Rocco A Paluch, Jessica Mendez, Emily Slominski, Gowthami Gengatharan, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 28807618
1: Appetite, vol. 120, 2016
Authors: Jessica O'Neill, Tinuke Oluyomi Daniel, Leonard H. Epstein
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2016
Authors: Janet L Thomas, Xianghua Luo, Jill Bengtson, Qi Wang, Winta Ghidei, John Nyman, Katherine Lust, Lawrence An, David W Wetter, Leonard Epstein, Jasjit S Ahluwalia
PubMedId: 26767340
1: Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 111, 2015
Authors: Kerri N Boutelle, Abby Braden, Jennifer M Douglas, Kyung E Rhee, David Strong, Cheryl L Rock, Denise E Wilfley, Leonard Epstein, Scott Crow
PubMedId: 26358536
1: Contemporary clinical trials, vol. 45, 2015
Authors: Kai Ling Kong, Rina D Eiden, Denise M Feda, Corrin L Stier, Kelly D Fletcher, Elizabeth M Woodworth, Rocco A Paluch, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: The reinforcing value of food may be established early in life. Research shows that infant weight status is related to the relative reinforcing value of food versus non-food alternatives (food reinforcing ratio, FRR). The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the effects of a 6-week music enhancement program (Music Together, n=14) versus an active play date control group (n=13) on the FRR in 9- to 16-month-old infants who were high in relative food reinforcement. Participating parents and infants attended six weekly 45-min group classes. Parents in the music group and the play date group were encouraged to listen to the Music Together program CD or play with the play date group's toy with their infants at home, respectively. Intent-to-treat analysis showed a decrease in FRR for infants in the music group (meanSD: -0.130.13) in comparison to a slight increase in the control group (0.040.11) (F[1, 24] =11.86, P=0.002). These findings provide evidence that relative reinforcing value of food can be reduced by promoting alternative reinforcers at an early age.
PubMedId: 27028283
Journal-article: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 24, 2015
Authors: Teresa Quattrin, James N Roemmich, Rocco Paluch, Jihnhee Yu, Leonard H Epstein, Michelle A Ecker
Keywords: expert committee recommendations obesity overweight patient centered medical home percent over BMI preschool children
Abstract: To test in the primary care setting the short- and long-term efficacy of a behavioral intervention that simultaneously targeted an overweight child and parent versus an information control (IC) targeting weight control only in the child. Two- to 5-year-old children who had BMI 85th percentile and an overweight parent (BMI >25 kg/m2) were randomized to Intervention or IC, both receiving diet and activity education over 12 months (13 sessions) followed by 12-month follow-up (3 sessions). Parents in the Intervention group were also targeted for weight control and received behavioral intervention. Pediatricians in 4 practices enrolled their patients with the assistance of embedded recruiters (Practice Enhancement Assistants) who assisted with treatment too. A total of 96 of the 105 children randomized (Intervention n = 46; IC n = 50) started the program and had data at baseline. Children in the Intervention experienced greater reductions in percent over BMI (group months; P = .002) and z-BMI (group months; P < 0.001) compared with IC throughout treatment and follow-up. Greater BMI reduction was observed over time for parents in the Intervention compared with IC (P < .001) throughout treatment and follow-up. Child weight changes were correlated with parent weight changes at 12 and 24 months (r = 0.38 and 0.26; P < .001 and P = .03). Concurrently targeting preschool-aged overweight and obese youth and their parents in primary care with behavioral intervention results in greater decreases in child percent over BMI, z-BMI, and parent BMI compared with IC. The difference between Intervention and IC persists after 12 months of follow-up.
PubMedId: 25049340
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 134, 2014
Authors: Jennifer L. Scheid, Katelyn A. Carr, Henry Lin, Kelly D. Fletcher, Lara Sucheston, Prashant K. Singh, Robbert Salis, Richard W. Erbe, Myles S. Faith, David B. Allison, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 132, pp. 51-56, 2014
Authors: Katelyn A Carr, Henry Lin, Kelly D Fletcher, Lara Sucheston, Prashant K Singh, Robbert J Salis, Richard W Erbe, Myles S Faith, David B Allison, Eric Stice, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Food reinforcement, or the motivation to eat, has been associated with increased energy intake, greater body weight, and prospective weight gain. Much of the previous research on the reinforcing value of food has focused on the role of dopamine, but it may be worthwhile to examine genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin and opioid systems as these neurotransmitters have been shown to be related to reinforcement processes and to influence energy intake. We examined the relationship among 44 candidate genetic polymorphisms in the dopamine, serotonin, and opioid systems, as well as food reinforcement and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 245 individuals. Polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-LPR) and serotonin receptor 2A genes (rs6314) moderated the effect of food reinforcement on BMI, accounting for an additional 5-10% variance and revealed a potential role of the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6314, in the serotonin 2A receptor as a differential susceptibility factor for obesity. Differential susceptibility describes a factor that can confer either risk or protection depending on a second variable, such that rs6314 is predictive of both high and low BMI based on the level of food reinforcement, while the diathesis stress or dual-gain model only influences one end of the outcome measure. The interaction with MAOA-LPR better fits the diathesis stress model, with the 3.5R/4R allele conferring protection for individuals low in food reinforcement. These results provide new insight into genes theoretically involved in obesity, and support the hypothesis that genetics moderate the association between food reinforcement and BMI.
PubMedId: 23544600
Journal-article: Behavioral neuroscience, vol. 127, 2013
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Noelle Jankowiak, Chantal Nederkoorn, Hollie A Raynor, Simone A French, Eric Finkelstein
Abstract: One way in which to modify food purchases is to change prices through tax policy, subsidy policy, or both. We reviewed the growing body of experimental research conducted in the laboratory and in the field that investigates the following: the extent to which price changes influence purchases of targeted and nontargeted foods, total energy, or macronutrients purchased; the interaction of price changes with adjunctive interventions; and moderators of sensitivity to price changes. After a brief overview of economic principles and observational research that addresses these issues, we present a targeted review of experimental research. Experimental research suggests that price changes modify purchases of targeted foods, but research on the overall nutritional quality of purchases is mixed because of substitution effects. There is mixed support for combining price changes with adjunctive interventions, and there are no replicated findings on moderators to price sensitivity in experiments. Additional focused research is needed to better inform food policy development with the aim of improving eating behavior and preventing obesity.
PubMedId: 22378726
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 95, 2012
Authors: Teresa Quattrin, James N Roemmich, Rocco Paluch, Jihnhee Yu, Leonard H Epstein, Michelle A Ecker
Abstract: To test the efficacy of an innovative family-based intervention for overweight preschool-aged children and overweight parents conducted in the primary care setting. Children with BMI 85th percentile and an overweight parent were randomized to intervention or information control (IC). Trained staff delivered dietary and physical/sedentary activities education to parents over 6 months (10 group meetings and 8 calls). Parents in the intervention received also behavioral modification. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed by using mixed analysis of variance models to test changes in child percent over BMI (%OBMI) and z-BMI and to explore potential moderators of group differences in treatment response. Ninety-six of 105 randomized families started the program: 46 children (31 girls/15 boys) in the intervention and 50 (33 girls/17 boys) in the IC, with 33 and 39 mothers and 13 and 11 fathers in intervention and IC, respectively. Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. Children in the intervention group had greater %OBMI and z-BMI decreases at 3 and 6 months compared with those assigned to IC (P < .0021). A greater BMI reduction over time was also observed in parents in the intervention compared with parents assigned to IC (P < .0001). Child %OBMI and parent BMI changes were correlated (r = .31; P = .003). Children with greater baseline %OBMI were more likely to have a greater %OBMI decrease over time (P = .02). Concurrently targeting preschool-aged overweight youth and their overweight parents for behavioral weight control in a primary care setting reduced child %OBMI and parent BMI, with parent and child weight changes correlating.
PubMedId: 22987879
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 130, 2012
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Henry Lin, Katelyn A Carr, Kelly D Fletcher
Abstract: The relative reinforcing value of food (RRV(food)) provides an index of the motivation to eat. Research has shown that RRV(food) is higher in obese individuals than their non-obese peers, is associated with greater energy intake, predicts weight gain and interacts with impulsivity to predict energy intake. This study was designed to determine whether dietary restraint, dietary disinhibition or hunger moderate the effect of RRV(food) on the weight status and energy intake in 273 adults of various body mass index (BMI) levels. Hierarchical regression was used to assess the independent effects of RRV(food) on BMI and energy intake, controlling for age, sex, income, education, minority status, and RRV(reading). Results showed that greater RRV(food), but not RRV(reading), was associated with greater BMI and energy intake. Dietary disinhibition and dietary restraint moderated the relationship between RRV(food) and BMI, with dietary disinhibition being a stronger moderator of this relationship (r(2)=0.20) than dietary restraint (r(2)=0.095). In addition, dietary disinhibition moderated the effect of RRV(food) on energy intake. These results replicate the importance of RRV(food) as a predictor of obesity, and show that psychological factors moderate the effect of food reinforcement on body weight and energy intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00962117.
PubMedId: 22005184
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 58, 2011
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Katelyn A Carr, Meghan D Cavanaugh, Rocco A Paluch, Mark E Bouton
Abstract: Habituation is a form of learning in which repeated exposure to a stimulus leads to a decrease in responding. Eating involves repeated presentation of the same food stimulus in a meal, and habituation is reliably observed within a meal such that faster rates of habituation are associated with less energy intake. It is possible that repeated presentation of the same food over days will lead to long-term habituation, such that subjects habituate to foods repeated over meals. However, no research on long-term habituation to food in humans has been conducted. The current study was designed to assess long-term habituation in 16 obese and 16 nonobese premenopausal women. Obese and nonobese women (aged 20-50 y) were randomly assigned to receive a macaroni and cheese meal presented 5 times, either daily for 1 wk or once per week for 5 wk. In both obese and nonobese women, daily presentation of food resulted in faster habituation and less energy intake than did once-weekly presentation of food. Long-term habituation was observed when the same food was presented at daily meals but not when presented once weekly for 5 wk. These results provide the first evidence of long-term habituation to food in women and show that memory of food over daily meals can increase the rate of habituation and reduce energy intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01208870.
PubMedId: 21593492
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 94, 2011
Authors: Katelyn A Carr, Tinuke Oluyomi Daniel, Henry Lin, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 21999693
Journal Article: Current drug abuse reviews, vol. 4, 2011
Authors: Katelyn A Carr, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Reinforcing value and habituation are two processes that have been used to study eating behaviors, but no research has examined their relationship, how they relate to energy intake, and whether they respond in a similar manner to food deprivation. Twenty-two female subjects were randomized to food deprived or non-deprived conditions, and assessed for food reinforcement, habituation to food and ad libitum eating. Results showed food reinforcement and habituation are correlated (r = 0.62, p = 0.002) and both independently predict energy intake. Hierarchical regression showed that the rate of habituation accounted for 30 percent of the variance in eating (p = 0.008), and adding food reinforcement increased the amount of variance accounted for up to 57.5 percent (p < 0.05). This suggests that both processes may influence energy intake in a meal.
PubMedId: 21423567
Journal-article: Learning and motivation, vol. 42, 2011
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Katelyn A Carr, Henry Lin, Kelly D Fletcher
Abstract: Food is a powerful reinforcer that motivates people to eat. The relative reinforcing value of food (RRV(food)) is associated with obesity and energy intake and interacts with impulsivity to predict energy intake. How RRV(food) is related to macronutrient choice in ad libitum eating tasks in humans has not been studied; however, animal research suggests that sugar or simple carbohydrates may be a determinant of reward value in food. This study assessed which macronutrients are associated with food reinforcement. Two hundred seventy-three adults with various body mass indexes were assessed for RRV(food), the relative reinforcing value of reading, food hedonics, energy intake in an ad libitum taste test, and usual energy intake derived from repeated 24-h dietary recalls. Multiple regression was used to assess the relation between predictors of total energy and energy associated with macronutrient intake after control for age, sex, income, education, minority status, and other macronutrient intakes. The results showed that the relative proportion of responding for food compared with reading (RRV(prop)) was positively related to body mass index, laboratory-measured energy intake, and usual energy intake. In addition, RRV(prop) was a predictor of sugar intake but not of total carbohydrate, fat, or protein intake. These results are consistent with basic animal research showing that sugar is related to food reward and with the hypothesis that food reward processes are more strongly related to eating than are food hedonics. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00962117.
PubMedId: 21543545
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 94, 2011
Authors: Eric Stice, Sonja Yokum, Kyle S Burger, Leonard H Epstein, Dana M Small
Abstract: Obese humans, compared with normal-weight humans, have less striatal D2 receptors and striatal response to food intake; weaker striatal response to food predicts weight gain for individuals at genetic risk for reduced dopamine (DA) signaling, consistent with the reward-deficit theory of obesity. Yet these may not be initial vulnerability factors, as overeating reduces D2 receptor density, D2 sensitivity, reward sensitivity, and striatal response to food. Obese humans also show greater striatal, amygdalar, orbitofrontal cortex, and somatosensory region response to food images than normal-weight humans do, which predicts weight gain for those not at genetic risk for compromised dopamine signaling, consonant with the reward-surfeit theory of obesity. However, after pairings of palatable food intake and predictive cues, DA signaling increases in response to the cues, implying that eating palatable food contributes to increased responsivity. Using fMRI, we tested whether normal-weight adolescents at high- versus low-risk for obesity showed aberrant activation of reward circuitry in response to receipt and anticipated receipt of palatable food and monetary reward. High-risk youth showed greater activation in the caudate, parietal operculum, and frontal operculum in response to food intake and in the caudate, putamen, insula, thalamus, and orbitofrontal cortex in response to monetary reward. No differences emerged in response to anticipated food or monetary reward. Data indicate that youth at risk for obesity show elevated reward circuitry responsivity in general, coupled with elevated somatosensory region responsivity to food, which may lead to overeating that produces blunted dopamine signaling and elevated responsivity to food cues.
PubMedId: 21430137
Journal-article: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, vol. 31, 2011
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Robinson, James N Roemmich, Angela Marusewski
Abstract: Slow rates of habituation are cross-sectionally related to greater energy intake and body weight. The present study is designed to assess whether slow rates of habituation are prospectively related to zBMI change over a 12 month period in 66 lean 8-12 year-old children, and whether the rate of habituation is a stable behavioral phenotype. Results showed that slower rates of habituation predicted greater zBMI change, controlling for child sex, age, initial zBMI, dietary awareness and minority status. In addition, the rate of habituation was stable over the year of observation. These data suggest that slow rates of habituation may be a risk factor for weight gain and the development of obesity. Future research is needed to understand the mechanism for this effect, and assess whether the habituation phenotype interacts with other behavioral phenotypes, such as food reinforcement, to influence increases in zBMI.
PubMedId: 21741020
Journal-article: Eating behaviors, vol. 12, 2010
Authors: John J Leddy, Karl Kozlowski, James P Donnelly, David R Pendergast, Leonard H Epstein, Barry Willer
Abstract: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of subsymptom threshold exercise training for the treatment of post-concussion syndrome (PCS). Prospective case series. University Sports Medicine Concussion Clinic. Twelve refractory patients with PCS (6 athletes and 6 nonathletes). Treadmill test to symptom exacerbation threshold (ST) before and after 2 to 3 weeks of baseline. Subjects then exercised 5 to 6 days per week at 80% ST heart rate (HR) until voluntary peak exertion without symptom exacerbation. Treadmill testing was repeated every 3 weeks. Adverse reactions to exercise, PCS symptoms, HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP), achievement of maximal exertion, and return to work/sport. Pretreatment, ST occurred at low exercise HR (147 + or - 27 bpm) and SBP (142 + or - 6 mm Hg). After treatment, subjects exercised longer (9.75 + or - 6.38 minutes to 18.67 + or - 2.53 minutes, P = .001) and achieved peak HR (179 + or - 17 bpm) and SBP (156 + or - 13 mm Hg), both P < .001 versus pretreatment, without symptom exacerbation. Time series analysis showed significant change in rate of symptom reduction for all subjects and reduced mean symptom number in 8/11. Rate of PCS symptom improvement was related to peak exercise HR (r = -0.55, P = .04). Athletes recovered faster than nonathletes (25 + or - 8.7 vs 74.8 + or - 27.2 days, P = .01). No adverse events were reported. Athletes returned to sport and nonathletes to work. Treatment with controlled exercise is a safe program that appears to improve PCS symptoms when compared with a no-treatment baseline. A randomized controlled study is warranted.
PubMedId: 20051730
Journal-article: Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine, vol. 20, 2010
Authors: Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Lauren A Nitecki, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Behavioral economics offers a framework to understand choice among alternatives. There is no research on the interrelationship between food and social activity in overweight and non-overweight children. The purpose of this study is to test the substitutability of food and social interactions using behavioral economic methods in overweight and non-overweight youth. Fifty-four (24 males and 30 females) overweight and non-overweight youth aged 9 to 11 years old were tested using a behavioral choice paradigm which involved participants responding to earn points exchangeable for food and/or social activity. Youth substituted food for social activities when the cost of social time with an unfamiliar peer increased (p < 0.05) and substituted food for social activities with an unfamiliar peer when the cost of food increased (p < 0.05). However, when interacting with a friend was the alternative, participants did not substitute food for social interactions. Social interactions can serve as a substitute for food in both lean and overweight youth.
PubMedId: 20052567
Journal-article: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 38, 2010
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Kelly K Dearing, Lora G Roba, Eric Finkelstein
Abstract: There is limited research on how taxes and subsidies would influence the energy and nutritional quality of food purchases. Using an experimental analogue purchasing task, we examined the effects of increasing the price of high-calorie-for-nutrient foods or reducing the price of low-calorie-for-nutrient foods by 12.5% and 25% on mothers' purchases of 68 common foods and drinks. Taxing less healthy foods with low nutrient density reduced energy (caloric) intake, while reducing the proportion of fat and increasing the proportion of protein purchased. Subsidizing more healthful foods with high nutrient density increased energy intake, without changing the macronutrient profile of foods purchased. These results favor taxes as a way to reduce caloric intake.
PubMedId: 20424078
Journal-article: Psychological science, vol. 21, 2010
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Brian H Wrotniak
PubMedId: 20107466
Journal-article: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 18 Suppl 1, 2010
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Kelly K Dearing, Richard W Erbe
Abstract: Family-based treatments show positive relationships between parent and child weight losses. One mechanism for similar parent-child changes may be a common genetic predisposition to respond similarly to a structured weight loss program. We examined whether concordance of the Taq1 A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) predicts similarities in zBMI change in 26 families with obese parents and overweight/obese 8-12-year-old children. Results showed a relationship between parent and child zBMI change over 6 and 12 months (rs=.69, .77, ps<0.001), and concordance for the number of Taq1 A1 alleles predicted the similarity in parent and child weight loss at 6 (p=0.003) and 12 (p=0.025) months. These results show concordance of the Taq1 A1 allele of the DRD2 between parents and children may be one mechanism for the similar response to family-based treatments within families.
PubMedId: 20561550
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 55, 2010
Authors: Samina Raja, Li Yin, James Roemmich, Changxing Ma, Leonard Epstein, Pavan Yadav, Alex Brian Ticoalu
Journal-article: Journal of Planning Education and Research, vol. 29, pp. 444-460, 2010
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Sarah J Salvy, Katelyn A Carr, Kelly K Dearing, Warren K Bickel
Abstract: Choice is a central construct in behavioral economics, with choice research divided into choice of concurrent alternative reinforcers, which is conceptualized as relative reinforcing value, or choice of small immediate versus larger delayed rewards, usually of the same commodity, which is conceptualized as delay of gratification and delay discounting. Relative reinforcing value, delay of gratification and delay discounting paradigms can be used to study obesity, which involves strong motivation to obtain and consume food reinforcers. Strong food reinforcement and difficulties in delay of gratification are risk factors for child weight gain, and both are related to individual differences in overweight/obesity. Delay discounting interacts with food reinforcement to predict energy intake. We provide a selective review of research on each of these areas, and argue that the division of choice into reinforcing value versus delay discounting is based on an arbitrary definition based on the temporality of choices. We present a model that integrates reinforcing value and delay discounting approaches. Implications of this theoretical approach to better understand excess energy intake and obesity are discussed. The paper represents an invited review by a symposium, award winner or keynote speaker at the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior [SSIB] Annual Meeting in Portland, July 2009.
PubMedId: 20435052
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 100, 2010
Authors: Bonnie Spring, Kristin Schneider, H G McFadden, Jocelyn Vaughn, Andrea T Kozak, Malaina Smith, Arlen C Moller, Leonard Epstein, Stephanie W Russell, Andrew DeMott, Donald Hedeker
Abstract: Suboptimal diet and physical inactivity are prevalent, co-occurring chronic disease risk factors, yet little is known about how to maximize multiple risk behavior change. Make Better Choices, a randomized controlled trial, tests competing hypotheses about the optimal way to promote healthy change in four bundled risk behaviors: high saturated fat intake, low fruit and vegetable intake, low physical activity, and high sedentary leisure screen time. The study aim is to determine which combination of two behavior change goals--one dietary, one activity--yields greatest overall healthy lifestyle change. Adults (n = 200) with poor quality diet and sedentary lifestyle will be recruited and screened for study eligibility. Participants will be trained to record their diet and activities onto a personal data assistant, and use it to complete two weeks of baseline. Those who continue to show all four risk behaviors after baseline recording will be randomized to one of four behavior change prescriptions: 1) increase fruits and vegetables and increase physical activity, 2) decrease saturated fat and increase physical activity, 3) increase fruits and vegetable and decrease saturated fat, or 4) decrease saturated fat and decrease sedentary activity. They will use decision support feedback on the personal digital assistant and receive counseling from a coach to alter their diet and activity during a 3-week prescription period when payment is contingent upon meeting behavior change goals. They will continue recording on an intermittent schedule during a 4.5-month maintenance period when payment is not contingent upon goal attainment. The primary outcome is overall healthy lifestyle change, aggregated across all four risk behaviors. The Make Better Choices trial tests a disseminable lifestyle intervention supported by handheld technology. Findings will fill a gap in knowledge about optimal goal prescription to facilitate simultaneous diet and activity change. Results will shed light on which goal prescription maximizes healthful lifestyle change. Clinical Trials Gov. Identifier NCT00113672.
PubMedId: 20920275
Journal-article: BMC public health, vol. 10, 2010
Authors: Brandi Y Rollins, Kelly K Dearing, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Recent theoretical approaches to food intake hypothesize that eating represents a balance between reward-driven motivation to eat versus inhibitory executive function processes, however this hypothesis remains to be tested. The objective of the current study was to test the hypothesis that the motivation to eat, operationalized by the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of food, and inhibitory processes, assessed by delay discounting (DD), interact to influence energy intake in an ad libitum eating task. Female subjects (n = 24) completed a DD of money procedure, RRV task, and an ad libitum eating task in counterbalanced sessions. RRV of food predicted total energy intake, however the effect of the RRV of food on energy intake was moderated by DD. Women higher in DD and RRV of food consumed greater total energy, whereas women higher in RRV of food but lower in DD consumed less total energy. Our findings support the hypothesis that reinforcing value and executive function mediated processes interactively influence food consumption.
PubMedId: 20678532
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 55, 2010
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich, Meghan D Cavanaugh, Rocco A Paluch
Abstract: Obesity is correlated with a sedentary lifestyle, and the motivation to be active or sedentary is correlated with obesity. The present study tests the hypothesis that the motivation to be active or sedentary is correlated with weight change when children reduce their sedentary behavior. The motivation to be active or sedentary, changes in weight, and accelerometer assessed physical activity were collected for 55 families with overweight/obese children who participated in a nine-week field study to examine behavior and weight change as a function of reducing sedentary behavior. Children were studied in three 3-week phases, baseline, reduce targeted sedentary behaviors by 25% and reduce targeted sedentary behaviors by 50%. The targeted sedentary behaviors included television, video game playing, video watching, and computer use. The reinforcing value of sedentary behavior but not physical activity, was correlated with weight change, as losing weight was associated with lower reinforcing value of sedentary behaviors. Reducing sedentary behavior was not associated with a significant change in objectively measured physical activity, suggesting the main way in which reducing sedentary behavior influenced weight change is by complementary changes in energy intake. Estimated energy intake supported the hypothesis that reducing sedentary behaviors influences weight by reducing energy intake. These data show that the motivation to be sedentary limits the effects of reducing sedentary behavior on weight change in obese children.
PubMedId: 21342518
Journal-article: The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 8, 2010
Authors: Brian H Wrotniak, Sarah J Salvy, Laura Lazarus, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine motor proficiency relations of siblings. 23 sibling pairs ages 5 to 13 years were studied. Motor proficiency was assessed by the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Short Form of 14 items, adjusting for Body Mass Index percentile, age, and sex. The association among siblings' overall motor proficiency was not statistically significant. When each of the 14 items in the test was examined separately, significant associations were found. Items positively associated among siblings included walking on a balance beam, tapping feet and making circles, and sorting shape cards. Copying a picture of overlapping pencils and making dots in circles were inversely related. The results indicate that siblings may share certain motor-skill components of balance, bilateral coordination, and upper limb speed or dexterity, but do not necessarily have the same global motor competence. Additional research is needed to explain relations in motor skills among siblings.
PubMedId: 19425452
Journal-article: Perceptual and motor skills, vol. 108, 2009
Authors: John J Leddy, James G Waxmonsky, Robert J Salis, Rocco A Paluch, Elizabeth M Gnagy, Patrick Mahaney, Richard Erbe, William E Pelham, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: There are individual differences in the effects of methylphenidate (MPH), a dopamine (DA) transport inhibitor, on appetite in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One potential moderating factor is variation in brain DA activity, which is influenced by dopamine-related genes: the DA transporter (DAT) (SLC6A3), the DA D2 receptor (DRD2), and the DA D4 receptor (DRD4) genes. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between dopamine-related gene polymorphisms and food consumption in ADHD children receiving varying doses of MPH. In a randomized, within-subject, double-blind design, 58 ADHD children (ages 6-12 years) received placebo, 0.15, 0.3, or 0.6 mg/kg of MPH three times daily over 9 weeks. Observations of percent lunch consumed as a function of dopamine-related genotypes and MPH dose were analyzed using mixed effects regression models. A significant dose-response reduction in eating was observed across all genotypes (p < 0.001). There was an interaction of DAT SLC6A3 and DRD2 genotypes and dose, because 9/9 DAT children showed a stronger effect of dose when compared with the 9/10 and 10/10 children (p < 0.001) and DRD2 A2/A2 children showed a stronger effect of dose when compared with A1/A1 and A1/A2 children combined (p = 0.007). There was no significant interaction of dose by DRD4 genotype. Lunch consumption decreased as a function of MPH dose. DA-related genotypes associated with greater brain DA signaling moderated the influence of drug on consumption. These results provide information relevant to predicting which children are likely to experience the greatest appetite suppression when taking MPH.
PubMedId: 19364291
Journal-article: Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology, vol. 19, 2009
Authors: James N. Roemmich, Tressa M. White, Rocco Paluch, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 41, pp. 118, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Robinson, Jennifer L Temple, James N Roemmich, Angela L Marusewski, Rachel L Nadbrzuch
Abstract: Research has shown that variety reduces the rate of habituation, or a general reduction in the rate of responding, for low-energy-density (LED) and high-energy-density (HED) foods. We assessed whether the effects of variety on habituation of motivation to eat are different in overweight and lean children. Overweight and lean children (n = 84) were randomly assigned to groups that varied as to whether they received their favorite or a variety of LED or HED foods. Habituation was slower for overweight than for nonoverweight children (P = 0.008), for a variety of foods than for the same foods (P < 0.001), and for LED than for HED foods (P < 0.001). Energy intake was greater for overweight than for nonoverweight children provided with variety (P = 0.004) and was greater for overweight or nonoverweight children provided with the same food (P < 0.001). A variety of HED foods increased energy intake more than did the same HED foods (P < 0.001); this increase was greater than energy intake with the same or a variety of LED foods (P < 0.001). Children who sensitized, or showed an increase in responding before habituating, showed slower habituation (P < 0.001) and consumed more energy (P = 0.039) than did children who did not sensitize. Habituation is influenced by variety of foods, and overweight children increase energy intake more with variety than do leaner children. Research is needed to evaluate mechanisms of how variety influences the motivation to eat and energy intake, and how the variety effect can be used to influence intake across multiple eating occasions in children.
PubMedId: 19176724
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 89, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Robinson, Jennifer L Temple, James N Roemmich, Angela Marusewski, Rachel Nadbrzuch
Abstract: The rate of habituation to food is inversely related to energy intake, and overweight children may habituate slower to food and consume more energy. This study compared patterns of sensitization, as defined by an initial increase in operant or motivated responding for food, and habituation, defined by gradual reduction in responding, for macaroni and cheese and pizza in overweight and non-overweight 8-12 year-old children. Non-overweight children habituated faster to both foods than overweight children (p = 0.03). All children recovered motivated responding for a new food (chocolate). Overweight children consumed more energy than non-overweight children (p = 0.0004). Children who showed a sensitization in responding consumed more food (p = 0.001), and sensitization moderated the effect of overweight on habituation, with slower habituation for overweight children who sensitized (p < 0.0001). This study replicates previous data on overweight/non-overweight differences in habituation of food and of energy intake, and provides new information that individual differences in sensitization and habituation of motivated responding to food cues may be associated with a sustained motivation to eat, resulting in greater energy intake.
PubMedId: 19649135
Journal-article: Learning and motivation, vol. 39, 2009
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, Alison M Bulkley, Rebecca L Badawy, Nicole Krause, Sarah McCann, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Food reinforcement, ie, motivation to obtain food, is associated with energy intake and obesity. Finding ways to decrease the reinforcing value of unhealthy foods may help with adherence to diets and maintenance of weight loss. Our previous study in nonobese adults showed that daily consumption of the same snack food (food consumed apart from meals) for 14 d significantly decreased its reinforcing value. The aims of this study were to replicate and extend these findings to obese individuals and to examine the effects of different portion sizes of snack foods on food reinforcement. Food reinforcement and liking were tested in 31 obese and 27 nonobese women at baseline and after 2 wk of daily consumption of 0, 100, or 300 kcal/d of the same snack food. We found a significant interaction of phase, portion size, and body mass index on the pattern of operant responding for food. Obese women had a significant increase in food reinforcement after consuming the 300-kcal portion of food for 2 wk, whereas nonobese women had the opposite response. No significant differences were found on the reinforcing value with the 0- and 100-kcal portion-size conditions. Women in the 300-kcal group (obese and nonobese) reported a significant decrease in snack food liking from baseline to after daily intake. These findings suggest that obese and nonobese women respond differently to the daily intake of a snack food and that this may not be a viable mechanism for reducing food reinforcement in obese women. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00837694.
PubMedId: 19458018
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 90, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jennifer L Temple, James N Roemmich, Mark E Bouton
Abstract: Research has shown that animals and humans habituate on a variety of behavioral and physiological responses to repeated presentations of food cues, and habituation is related to amount of food consumed and cessation of eating. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of experimental paradigms used to study habituation, integrate a theoretical approach to habituation to food based on memory and associative conditioning models, and review research on factors that influence habituation. Individual differences in habituation as they relate to obesity and eating disorders are reviewed, along with research on how individual differences in memory can influence habituation. Other associative conditioning approaches to ingestive behavior are reviewed, as well as how habituation provides novel approaches to preventing or treating obesity. Finally, new directions for habituation research are presented. Habituation provides a novel theoretical framework from which to understand factors that regulate ingestive behavior.
PubMedId: 19348547
Journal-article: Psychological review, vol. 116, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Kelly K Dearing, Lora G Roba
Abstract: Behavioral choice theory and laboratory choice paradigms can provide a framework to understand the reinforcing efficacy or reinforcing value of food. Reinforcing efficacy is measured in the laboratory by assessing how much effort one will engage in to gain access to food as the amount of work progressively increases. However, this method to establish demand curves as estimates of reinforcer efficacy is time consuming and limits the number of reinforcers that can be tested. The general aim of this study was to compare the reinforcing efficacy of snack foods using a behavioral task that requires subjects to respond to gain access to portions of food (LAB task) with a questionnaire version of a purchasing task designed to determine demand curves (QUES task) in nonobese and obese adults (n=24). Results showed correlations between the maximal amount of money that individuals were willing to spend for food (QUES O(max)) and the maximal amount of responses made on the highest reinforcement schedule completed (LAB O(max)) (r=0.45, p<0.05), and between BMI and the LAB O(max) (r=0.43, p<0.05) and the QUES O(max) (r=0.52, p<0.05). The study suggests the questionnaire provides valid measures of reinforcing efficacy that can be used in place of or in conjunction with traditional laboratory paradigms to establish demand curves that describe the behavioral maintaining properties of food.
PubMedId: 20188288
Journal-article: Eating behaviors, vol. 11, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Robinson, James N Roemmich, Angela L Marusewski, Lora G Roba
Abstract: Variety is a major influence of energy intake, but it is not known how much foods have to vary to influence eating. Using a stimulus specificity habituation paradigm we assessed the influence of varying the texture and appearance of nutritionally identical foods on responding for food and energy intake, and whether sensitization, or an increase in responding prior to habituation, was related to the rate of habituation or recovery of responding. Children responded for elbow macaroni and cheese until they habituated, then were provided either more elbow macaroni and cheese, spiral macaroni and cheese, or chicken nuggets. Children provided chicken nuggets or spiral macaroni and cheese recovered responding in comparison to more elbow macaroni and cheese. Children who sensitized showed slower habituation and consumed more food and more energy than those who did not sensitize, but did not differ in recovery of responding to the chicken nuggets or spiral macaroni and cheese. Results show small variations in food characteristics lead to recovery of responding and increased intake after children have habituated.
PubMedId: 19765625
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 54, 2009
Authors: James N Roemmich, Tressa M White, Rocco Paluch, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Studying siblings discordant for adiposity allows for identifying risk factors for obesity by testing whether there is low familiality or resemblance of energy balance behaviors and then whether sibling differences in these behaviors are associated with differences in their adiposity. Nineteen sibling pairs discordant for overweight were assessed for physical activity, laboratory-based food consumption (single food, variety of foods), and parental control of child feeding behaviors. There was virtually no familiality for physical activity and energy intake during a single food meal. Sibling differences in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and energy intake independently predicted differences in their adiposity. There was high familiality for increased energy intake (responsivity) when presented with a meal composed of a variety of foods, and sibling differences in responsivity did not predict sibling differences in adiposity. Parent concern and monitoring of child eating had only slight familiality and were associated with sibling differences in adiposity. In conclusion, sibling differences in MVPA and energy intake and parent concern and monitoring of child eating may promote differences in adiposity. Increased responsivity to dietary variety by overweight siblings does not appear to promoting sibling discordance in overweight as normal weight and overweight siblings responded similarly to dietary variety.
PubMedId: 20633585
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 55, 2009
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, Christina M Legierski, April M Giacomelli, Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 18469229
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 87, pp. 1121-1127, 2008
Authors: Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, James N Roemmich, Julie C Bowker, Natalie D Romero, Phillip J Stadler, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: To test whether the presence of a peer or a friend increases the motivation to be physically active in overweight and non-overweight youth in a laboratory setting. Youth motivation to be physically active as a function of the social context was measured using a computerized relative reinforcing value task to earn points exchangeable for physical and/or sedentary activities. The presence of a friend (p<.001) increased youth's; motivation to be physically active. The presence of a peer increased overweight youth's; motivation to be physically active, whereas this was not the case for lean youth (p=.47). Participants biked a greater distance in the presence of a friend than when alone (p<.001). Overweight youth biked a greater distance in the presence of a peer than when alone, while this was not the case for lean youth (p=.23). Friendships may increase youth's motivation to engage in physical activity and promote greater physical activity in non-overweight and overweight youth.
PubMedId: 18617572
Journal-article: Journal of pediatric psychology, vol. 34, 2008
Authors: F Patterson, R A Schnoll, E P Wileyto, A Pinto, L H Epstein, P G Shields, L W Hawk, R F Tyndale, N Benowitz, C Lerman
PubMedId: 18388868
Journal-article: Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, vol. 84, 2008
Authors: James N Roemmich, Emily Y Liu, Alan D Rogol, Leonard H Epstein, Teresa Quattrin
Abstract: The influence of weight loss on insulin resistance was determined in severely overweight (BMI Z-score: 7.3 +/- 0.9 z-units) hyperinsulinemic (mean fasting serum insulin concentration: 33.0 +/- 6.7 muIU/mL) youth. Eight overweight youth and obese parents were studied at baseline and then at 6 and 12 months after behavioral weight loss therapy. Non-treated lean youth (n = 8) served as controls for normal interval growth. The groups were matched for sex, race, age (10.2 versus 10.1 years), and pubertal maturation, and evaluated for weight, height, blood pressure, and the homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Overweight youth had reductions (p
PubMedId: 18370681
Journal-article: Metabolic syndrome and related disorders, vol. 2, 2008
Authors: Daniel F Heitjan, Mengye Guo, Riju Ray, E Paul Wileyto, Leonard H Epstein, Caryn Lerman
Abstract: Pharmacogenetic clinical trials seek to identify genetic modifiers of treatment effects. When a trial has collected data on many potential genetic markers, a first step in analysis is to screen for evidence of pharmacogenetic effects by testing for treatment-by-marker interactions in a statistical model for the outcome of interest. This approach is potentially problematic because (i) individual significance tests can be overly sensitive, particularly when sample sizes are large; and (ii) standard significance tests fail to distinguish between markers that are likely, on biological grounds, to have an effect, and those that are not. One way to address these concerns is to perform Bayesian hypothesis tests [Berger (1985) Statistical decision theory and Bayesian analysis. New York: Springer; Kass and Raftery (1995) J Am Stat Assoc 90:773-795], which are typically more conservative than standard uncorrected frequentist tests, less conservative than multiplicity-corrected tests, and make explicit use of relevant biological information through specification of the prior distribution. In this article we use a Bayesian testing approach to screen a panel of genetic markers recorded in a randomized clinical trial of bupropion versus placebo for smoking cessation. From a panel of 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located on 11 candidate genes, we identify four SNPs (one each on CHRNA5 and CHRNA2 and two on CHAT) that appear to have pharmacogenetic relevance. Of these, the SNP on CHRNA5 is most robust to specification of the prior. An unadjusted frequentist test identifies seven SNPs, including these four, none of which remains significant upon correction for multiplicity. In a panel of 43 randomly selected control SNPs, none is significant by either the Bayesian or the corrected frequentist test.
PubMedId: 18165968
Journal-article: American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, vol. 147B, 2008
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich, Jodie L Robinson, Rocco A Paluch, Dana D Winiewicz, Janene H Fuerch, Thomas N Robinson
Abstract: To assess the effects of reducing television viewing and computer use on children's body mass index (BMI) as a risk factor for the development of overweight in young children. Randomized controlled clinical trial. University children's hospital. Seventy children aged 4 to 7 years whose BMI was at or above the 75th BMI percentile for age and sex. Children were randomized to an intervention to reduce their television viewing and computer use by 50% vs a monitoring control group that did not reduce television viewing or computer use. Age- and sex-standardized BMI (zBMI), television viewing, energy intake, and physical activity were monitored every 6 months during 2 years. Children randomized to the intervention group showed greater reductions in targeted sedentary behavior (P < .001), zBMI (P < .05), and energy intake (P < .05) compared with the monitoring control group. Socioeconomic status moderated zBMI change (P = .01), with the experimental intervention working better among families of low socioeconomic status. Changes in targeted sedentary behavior mediated changes in zBMI (P < .05). The change in television viewing was related to the change in energy intake (P < .001) but not to the change in physical activity (P =.37). Reducing television viewing and computer use may have an important role in preventing obesity and in lowering BMI in young children, and these changes may be related more to changes in energy intake than to changes in physical activity.
PubMedId: 18316661
Journal-article: Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine, vol. 162, 2008
Authors: Erik A Beers, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein, Peter J Horvath
Abstract: Sitting on a therapy ball or standing may be a passive means of increasing energy expenditure throughout the workday. The purpose of this study was to determine the energy expenditure and liking of performing clerical work in various postures. Subjects included 24 men and women employed in sedentary clerical occupations. Energy expenditure was measured while word processing in three standardized postures; sitting in an office chair, sitting on a therapy ball, and standing. Adults ranked their comfort, fatigue, and liking of each posture and were asked to perform their choice of 20 min of additional clerical work in one of the postures. Energy expenditure was 4.1 kcal/h greater (p or= 0.48). Subjects also liked sitting on a therapy ball as much as sitting in an office chair and liked sitting on a therapy ball more than standing (p
PubMedId: 18351381
Journal-article: European journal of applied physiology, vol. 103, 2008
Authors: Janet Audrain-McGovern, Daniel Rodriguez, Leonard H Epstein, Kelli Rodgers, Jocelyn Cuevas, E Paul Wileyto
Abstract: The present study investigated demographic and psychosocial correlates of smoking status and predictors of smoking cessation among young adults, ages 18-30 years old. Young adults (n=294) completed a self-report survey regarding their health habits and smokers were offered the opportunity to enroll in a smoking cessation program. Substitute reinforcers were greater among ex-smokers compared to nontreatment-seeking smokers, treatment-seeking smokers who did participate in a smoking cessation program and treatment-seeking smokers who did not subsequently participate in a smoking cessation program. Greater complementary reinforcers and delay discounting rates differentiated nontreatment-seeking smokers from ex-smokers and treatment-seeking smokers who subsequently attended a smoking cessation program. Nontreatment seekers were less likely to have higher depression symptoms than ex-smokers. Treatment seekers who did not attend a smoking cessation program tended to live in a household with another smoker, to not be college educated, and to be non-white. Young adult smokers who increased their substitute reinforcers across treatment were almost two times more likely to be quit at treatment end. These results highlight variables that may be important to consider in recruitment strategies and treatment components for smoking cessation interventions for young adult smokers.
PubMedId: 19619948
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 34, 2008
Authors: Jacob E Barkley, Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich
Abstract: During play children engage in short bouts of intense activity, much like interval training. This natural preference for interval-type activity may have important implications for prescribing the most motivating type of physical activity, but the motivation of children to be physically active in interval or continuous fashion has not yet been examined. In the present study, ventilatory threshold (VT) and VO2 peak were determined in boys (n=16) and girls (n=16) age 10+/-1.3 years. Children sampled interval and continuous constant-load physical activity protocols on a cycle ergometer at 20% VT on another day. The physical activity protocols were matched for energy expenditure. Children then completed an operant button pressing task using a progressive fixed ratio schedule to assess the relative reinforcing value (RRV) of interval versus continuous physical activity. The number of button presses performed to gain access in interval or continuous physical activity and output maximum (O(max)) were the primary outcome variables. Children performed more button presses (P<0.005) and had a greater O(max) (P<0.005) when working to gain access to interval compared to continuous physical activity at intensities >VT and VT and
PubMedId: 19375437
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 98, 2008
Authors: Janet Audrain-McGovern, Daniel Rodriguez, Leonard H Epstein, Jocelyn Cuevas, Kelli Rodgers, E Paul Wileyto
Abstract: Although higher delay discounting rates have been linked to cigarette smoking, little is known about the stability of delay discounting, whether delay discounting promotes smoking acquisition, whether smoking contributes to impulsive choices, or if different relationships exist in distinct subgroups. This study sought to fill these gaps within a prospective longitudinal cohort study (N=947) spanning mid-adolescence to young adulthood (age 15-21 years old). Smoking and delay discounting were measured across time. Covariates included peer and household smoking, academic performance, depression, novelty seeking, inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms, and alcohol and marijuana use. The associated processes latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) with paths from the delay discounting level factor (baseline measure) and the trend factor (slope) to the smoking trend factor (slope) fit the data well, chi(2)((19,n=947)) =15.37, p=.70, CFI=1.00, RMSEA=0, WRMR=.36. The results revealed that delay discounting did not change significantly across time. Baseline delay discounting had a significant positive effect on smoking trend (beta=.08, z=2.16, p=.03). A standard deviation (SD=1.41) increase in baseline delay discounting resulted in an 11% increase (OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.03, 1.23) in the odds of smoking uptake. The alternative path LCGM revealed that smoking did not significantly impact delay discounting (p's>.05). Growth mixture modeling identified three smoking trajectories: nonsmokers, early/fast smoking adopters, and slow smoking progressors. Delay discounting was higher in the smoking versus nonsmoking trajectories, but did not discriminate between the smoking trajectories, despite different acquisition patterns. Delay discounting may provide a variable by which to screen for smoking vulnerability and help identify subgroups to target for more intensive smoking prevention efforts that include novel behavioral components directed toward aspects of impulsivity.
PubMedId: 19443136
Journal-article: Drug and alcohol dependence, vol. 103, 2008
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Rocco A Paluch, Meghan D Beecher, James N Roemmich
Abstract: The objective was to compare targeting increased eating of healthy foods vs. reducing intake of high energy-dense foods within the context of a family-based behavioral weight control program. Forty-one 8-12 year-old children >85th BMI percentile were randomly assigned to a 24-month family-based behavioral treatment that targeted increasing fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy vs. reducing intake of high energy-dense foods. Children in the increase healthy food group showed greater reduction in zBMI compared to children in the reduce high energy-dense food group at 12- (-0.30 zBMI units vs. -0.15 zBMI units, P = 0.01) and 24- (-0.36 zBMI units vs -0.13 zBMI units, P = 0.04) month follow-up. Parents in the increase healthy food group showed greater reductions in concern about child weight (P = 0.007), and these changes were associated with child zBMI change (P = 0.008). Children in the reduce high energy-dense group showed larger sustained reductions in high energy-dense foods (P < 0.05). Baseline levels of high energy-dense foods (P < 0.05), parent food restraint (P = 0.01), parent concern over parent weight (P = 0.01) and parent acceptance of the child (P < 0.05) moderated child zBMI change, with greater sustained reductions in zBMI for children in the increase healthy food group for each measure. Parent zBMI change followed the same pattern as child changes, and parent and child zBMI changes were correlated (P < 0.001). Focusing on healthy food choices within an energy restricted diet may be useful in family-based weight control programs.
PubMedId: 18239639
Journal-article: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 16, 2008
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: The purpose of these studies was to test the hypothesis that dietary variety decreases the rate of habituation and increases energy intake in children. In Experiment 1, salivation in response to the same or a variety of food cues was measured followed by consumption of the study food(s). In Experiment 2, children responded in a computer task to earn points for the same or a variety of low or high energy density foods, which were then consumed. Salivation, number of responses, and energy intake were measured. Participants in the same groups habituated faster than those in the variety groups (p = .05), and in Experiment 2, the effect of variety was independent of energy density. Participants in the variety groups also consumed more energy than those in the same groups in both experiments (p = .05). Dietary variety disrupted habituation and increased energy intake in children. In addition, the response to dietary variety was independent of energy density, suggesting that increasing variety of low energy density foods may increase consumption.
PubMedId: 18248101
Journal-article: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 27, 2008
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Meghan D. Beecher, Jennifer L. Graf, James N. Roemmich
Journal-article: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 33, pp. 124-131, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jennifer L Temple, Brad J Neaderhiser, Robbert J Salis, Richard W Erbe, John J Leddy
Abstract: The authors measured food reinforcement, polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and dopamine transporter (DAT1) genes, and laboratory energy intake in 29 obese and 45 nonobese humans 18-40 years old. Food reinforcement was greater in obese than in nonobese individuals, especially in obese individuals with the TaqI A1 allele. Energy intake was greater for individuals high in food reinforcement and greatest in those high in food reinforcement with the TaqI A1 allele. No effect of the DAT1 genotype was observed. These data show that individual differences in food reinforcement may be important for obesity and that the DRD2 genotype may interact with food reinforcement to influence energy intake.
PubMedId: 17907820
Journal-article: Behavioral neuroscience, vol. 121, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, John J Leddy, Jennifer L Temple, Myles S Faith
Abstract: Eating represents a choice among many alternative behaviors. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of how food reinforcement and behavioral choice theory are related to eating and to show how this theoretical approach may help organize research on eating from molecular genetics through treatment and prevention of obesity. Special emphasis is placed on how food reinforcement and behavioral choice theory are relevant to understanding excess energy intake and obesity and how they provide a framework for examining factors that may influence eating and are outside of those that may regulate energy homeostasis. Methods to measure food reinforcement are reviewed, along with factors that influence the reinforcing value of eating. Contributions of neuroscience and genetics to the study of food reinforcement are illustrated by using the example of dopamine. Implications of food reinforcement for obesity and positive energy balance are explored, with suggestions for novel approaches to obesity treatment based on the synthesis of behavioral and pharmacological approaches to food reinforcement.
PubMedId: 17723034
Journal-article: Psychological bulletin, vol. 133, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich, Meghan D Beecher
Abstract: Family-based treatments for pediatric obesity were developed over 25 years ago. Over that time, youth have become more obese and the environment more obesiogenic, which may influence efficacy of pediatric weight control. Mixed-effects regression models were used to compare the efficacy of programs initiated 20 to 25 years ago to current programs through 24-month follow-up, as well as to reanalyze 10-year outcomes of previous research using contemporary measures and analytic strategies. z-BMI and percent overweight. Results showed significant reductions over time, with no differences in z-BMI change for older versus contemporary studies. Age was a predictor of z-BMI up to 24 months, with younger children showing larger change. Mixed-effects regression models replicated previous long-term effects of family-based interventions. Gender was a predictor of long-term z-BMI change, with girls benefiting more over time than did boys. The efficacy of the family-based behavioral approach to treating pediatric obesity replicates over a 25-year period. Challenges in evaluating treatment effects over time are discussed. Ideas for studying choice of treatments that vary in effect size and for strengthening family-based behavioral treatments are noted.
PubMedId: 17605557
Journal-article: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 26, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Kelly K Dearing, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich, David Cho
PubMedId: 17921365
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 86, pp. 914-922, 2007
Authors: James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein, Samina Raja, Li Yin
Abstract: To increase participation in physical activity, it is important to understand the factors associated with a child's choice to be physically active or sedentary. The neighborhood and home environments may be related to this choice. To determine whether the neighborhood environment or number of televisions in the home environment are independently associated with child physical activity and television time. The associations of the neighborhood and home environments on active and sedentary behaviors were studied in 44 boys and 44 girls who wore accelerometers and recorded their television watching behaviors. Neighborhood environment variables were measured using extensive geographic information systems analysis. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to predict physical activity after controlling for individual differences in age, socioeconomic status, percentage overweight, and time the accelerometer was worn in Step 1. Sex of the child was added in Step 2. A neighborhood design variable, street connectivity, accounted for an additional 6% (p
PubMedId: 17291168
Journal-article: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 33, 2007
Authors: Janet Audrain-McGovern, Chanita Hughes Halbert, Daniel Rodriguez, Leonard H Epstein, Kenneth P Tercyak
Abstract: This study investigated the predictors of participation in a smoking cessation trial for young adults ages 18 to 30 years old. Eligible smokers (n = 164) completed a telephone survey that measured demographic, smoking history, and psychosocial variables before the initiation of smoking cessation treatment. Young adult smokers who attended at least one smoking cessation session were compared with those who did not attend any sessions. Logistic regression analysis indicated that race and age were statistically significant multivariate predictors of participation. Caucasians were over six times (odds ratio, 6.03; 95% confidence interval, 2.41-15.05) more likely to participate in the smoking cessation program compared with non-Caucasians (61% versus 19%). For every SD increase in age (SD, 2.45), there was about a 2-fold increase in the likelihood that a young adult smoker participated in the smoking cessation program (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-2.71). Future research should investigate how to promote participation in smoking cessation programs among smokers in emerging adulthood and among non-Caucasian young adult smokers to prevent a lifelong habit associated with disproportionate morbidity and mortality.
PubMedId: 17337647
Journal-article: Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 16, 2007
Authors: Rocco A Paluch, Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich
Abstract: Our objective was to compare three BMI-based adiposity measures to assess change in pediatric weight control: LMS z-BMI, BMI sympercent, and percent overBMI. Comparison 1 presents changes of +1.0, -1.0, and -2.0 BMI units for 36 hypothetical children (7-, 11-, and 15-year-old children with BMI values from 19-39 kg/m(2)). Comparison 2 presents effect sizes over 12 months and the relationship between baseline and change for 140 8-12-year-old children with BMI values ranging from 21 to 37 kg/m(2). Comparison 1 showed smaller changes in z-BMI than BMI sympercent or percent overBMI for equal changes in BMI when initial BMI values are greater. Comparison 2 showed similar effect sizes for the three measures, since there is a reduction in both standard deviation and magnitude of LMS z-BMI values as the BMI values increase. The three measures perform differently when considering the relationship of initial value to change. Initial percent overBMI shows a negative relationship with change, as heavier children show larger changes, LMS z-BMI shows a positive relationship, as children with lower baseline values show larger changes, and BMI sympercent changes were inconsistently related to baseline BMI sympercent values. Although all three measures result in similar effect sizes when evaluating treatment over time, we conclude that LMS z-BMI is less appropriate for comparing individuals and percent overBMI is the only measure that shows heavier children have greater change.
PubMedId: 17546615
Journal-article: American journal of human biology : the official journal of the Human Biology Council, vol. 19, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Meghan D Beecher, Jennifer L Graf, James N Roemmich
Abstract: Interactive video games are a popular alternative to physical activity in youth. One advancement in computer games are interactive games that use physical activity as a game playing controller, combining exercise and entertainment, or exertainment. This study tested the reinforcing value and activity levels of interactive dance and bicycle race games in 18 overweight and 17 nonoverweight 8- to 12-year-old youth. Reinforcing value was studied using a behavioral choice paradigm that provided children the opportunity to respond on progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement for a choice of either playing the video dance or bicycle game using a handheld video game controller or one of three options: dancing or bicycling alone, dancing or bicycling while watching a video, or playing the interactive dance or bicycle game. Reinforcing value was defined in relationship to the amount of responding children engaged in for either choice. Results showed the interactive dance game was more reinforcing than dancing alone or dancing while watching the video (p = .003), but there was no difference across bicycling conditions. Nonoverweight youth were more active when given the opportunity to play the interactive dance game than overweight children (p = .05). These results suggest that children may be motivated to be active when given the opportunity to play an interactive dance game.
PubMedId: 17447864
Journal-article: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 33, 2007
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: We have shown that physiological and behavioral responses habituate to food stimuli and recover when novel stimuli are presented. In addition, physiological responses in obese adults habituate slower to repeated food stimuli than those in non-obese individuals, which is related to greater energy intake. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that instrumental responding in overweight children habituates slower to food cues than in their non-overweight peers. Children were provided the opportunity to work for access to cheeseburger for 10 2-min trials, followed by French fries for 3 2-min trials. Results showed that children who had a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 85th BMI percentile (at risk for overweight; n=17) habituated slower than those with a BMI percentile less than the 85th BMI percentile (non-overweight; n=17). Response recovery to French fries did not differ between groups. Overweight children consumed significantly more grams of food and more energy than non-overweight children. When taken together, these data show that habituation may be an important individual difference characteristic that differentiates overweight from non-overweight children. Implications of this for prevention and treatment of obesity are discussed.
PubMedId: 17459429
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 91, 2007
Authors: John J. Leddy, Kathy Hovey, Robbert Salis, Renee Brennan, Leonard H. Epstein, Jean Wactawski-Wende
Journal-article: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 39, pp. S376, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Kelly K Dearing, Jennifer L Temple, Meghan D Cavanaugh
Abstract: Pediatric obesity involves choices among healthy and less healthy alternatives, as well as choices whose consequences vary over time, such as engaging in unhealthy behaviors now at the expense of future health. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative reinforcing value of food and behavioral impulsivity under different experimental conditions in a sample of 50 families screened for participation in a pediatric obesity treatment program. Relative reinforcing value for food versus money was studied under conditions in which increased response requirements were placed on either access to food or money, and the amount of money, the alternative reinforcer, was varied. Impulsivity for small immediate versus larger delayed monetary rewards was studied under conditions in which the value of the immediate reward and the duration of the delay were varied. Results showed that response requirements affected the choice of food for both parents and children (p<0.001), and there was a significant correlation between the number of food reinforcers chosen by parents and children (r=0.57, p<0.001). The value of the immediate reward differentially influenced choice of the immediate reward for parents and children (p<0.05), with children (p<0.001) but not parents (p=0.36) more impulsive as value of the immediate reward increased. The length of the delay influenced both parent (p=0.004) and child (p<0.01) choice of the immediate reward. Parent and child impulsivity were not correlated (r=0.15, p=0.29). This study suggests that food reinforcement may be more similar between parents and children than behavioral impulsivity, though additional research using other measures of relative reinforcing value and impulsivity is warranted.
PubMedId: 18549991
Journal-article: Eating behaviors, vol. 9, 2007
Authors: Natalie D Romero, Leonard H Epstein, Sarah-Jeanne Salvy
Abstract: Previous studies indicate that the presence of peers influences children's food consumption. It is assumed that one factor producing this effect in children is child modeling of food intake. The present study assesses the effect of a video model on the food intake of overweight (n=22) and nonoverweight (n=22) preadolescent girls. A 2 (weight status)x2 (small vs large serving size) factorial design was used to test the hypothesis that youth model others' food intake. Serving sizes were manipulated by showing a video model selecting and consuming either a small or a large serving of cookies. Results indicate a main effect of serving size condition, F(1,40)=5.1, P<0.05 (d=0.65; 95% confidence interval: 0.35 to 0.65), and a main effect of weight status, F(1,40)=4.9, P<0.05 (d=0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.35 to 0.65). Participants exposed to the large serving-size condition consumed more cookies than participants exposed to the small serving-size condition and overweight participants consumed considerably more cookies than nonoverweight participants. The interaction of weight status by serving-size condition did not reach statistical significance (P=0.2). These results suggest that peer-modeling influences overweight and nonoverweight preadolescent girls' snack consumption.
PubMedId: 19103334
Journal-article: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, 2007
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Within-session decreases in instrumental responding to obtain food, consistent with habituation, have been reliably demonstrated in adults and children. This study tested the hypothesis that within-session decreases in instrumental responding for food are due to habituation rather than satiation. Thirty-eight 8-12-year-old children performed a computer-based operant task to earn points toward access to potato chips for 20 min, and for chocolate candies for the final 6 min of the session. Portion size of the food reinforcer (75 kcal vs 225 kcal) and food consumption (consumption/no consumption). There was no difference in the rate of response decrease between the two portion size conditions. Both the consumption and non-consumption groups showed response decelerations during the first 20 min, with responses in the consumption group decreasing at a faster rate. When the novel food was presented, participants in all conditions recovered responding. Although satiation may contribute to reductions in motivated responding for food when food is consumed, habituation provides a more complete explanation for the results observed in this study.
PubMedId: 17961817
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 50, 2007
Authors: James N Roemmich, Jacob E Barkley, Christina L Lobarinas, Jamee H Foster, Tressa M White, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: This study determined whether liking and relative reinforcing value (RRV) of physical activity were associated with time youth spend in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Boys (n=21) and girls (n=15) age 8 to 12 years were measured for height, weight, aerobic fitness, liking and RRV of physical activity, and minutes in MVPA using accelerometers. Independence of liking and RRV of physical activity was established by a low correlation (r=0.08, p=0.64). Using MVPA as the dependent variable and hierarchical regression to control for individual differences in age, aerobic fitness, and time the accelerometer was worn in step 1 (R(2) of 0.60 for step 1), addition of liking and RRV of physical activity in step 2 produced an incremental increase in R(2) of 0.12 (p<0.01). When using median splits of the RRV and liking data to form subject groups, children with both a high liking and RRV of physical activity participated in greater (p< or = 0.02) MVPA (1340+/-70 min/week) than children with high RRV-low liking (1040+/-95 min/week), low RRV-high liking (978+/-88 min/week), or low RRV-low liking (1007+/-68 min/week) of physical activity. Thus, liking and RRV of physical activity are independently associated with MVPA. The combination of a high reinforcing value and liking of physical activity is associated with 33% greater participation in MVPA.
PubMedId: 18289620
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 93, 2007
Authors: Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Elizabeth Kieffer, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Although most eating occurs in a social context, the impact of peer influence on child food consumption and selection of healthy and unhealthy snacks has not been the object of systematic experimental study. The present experiment assessed the effects of peer interaction on energy intake and food choices in 18 overweight and 21 non-overweight youth. Participants had access to high and low-calorie food items and were provided with several games as alternatives to eating. On one occasion, participants were tested alone and on another occasion they were tested in dyads with an unfamiliar peer. Consistent with previous results, we found that overweight children ate substantially more when alone than when in the presence of a peer and also more when alone than the lean children in the same condition. Non-overweight youths' food intake was unaffected by the social context. Findings also indicated that the best predictor of whether participants consumed healthy snack foods was if the other youth in the dyad also consumed healthy snack foods. These findings suggest that the presence of peers can influence overweight children's energy intake and also influence healthier food selection in both overweight and non-overweight children.
PubMedId: 18329597
Journal-article: Eating behaviors, vol. 9, 2007
Authors: Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Julie Wojslawowicz Bowker, James N Roemmich, Natalie Romero, Elizabeth Kieffer, Rocco Paluch, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: The primary objective was to examine the associations between social context (the presence of peers, friends, and family members) and physical activity intensity for overweight and lean girls and boys. Participants for this study included 10 boys (M = 13.4 years; SD = .8) and 10 girls (M = 13.8 years; SD =. 8). Twelve participants were between the 15th and the 85th BMI percentile (eight girls, four boys) and eight youth were at or above the 85th BMI percentile (six boys, two girls). Participants reported on their activity intensity and whether the activity was solitary or with others for seven consecutive days. Children were more likely to report more intense physical activity when in the company of peers or close friends. Overweight children reported greater physical activity when in the presence of peers than did lean children; however, overweight children also reported more time spent alone. Taken together, findings highlight the importance of considering peer relationships in studies of physical activity and childhood "obesity".
PubMedId: 17525088
Journal-article: Journal of pediatric psychology, vol. 33, 2007
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, Kristine M Kent, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 17284729
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 85, pp. 355-361, 2007
Authors: James N Roemmich, Jasmine R Smith, Leonard H Epstein, Maya Lambiase
Abstract: The relationship between stress reactivity and total or central adiposity in children has not been widely studied. Data from two studies were combined to determine the relationship between reactivity to interpersonal stress and the adiposity of children. Stress reactivity to an interpersonal stressor (speech) was measured in 36 boys (9.8 +/- 1.3 years of age) and 27 girls (9.3 +/- 1.3 years of age). Total adiposity (percentage body fat) was estimated from skinfolds and central adiposity from the abdominal girth. Multiple regression was used to establish the associations of change in perceived stress and heart rate reactivity with adiposity. Age, sex, ethnicity, and baseline perceived stress and heart rate served as covariates for total adiposity. Fat mass was included as an additional covariate for the prediction of log abdominal girth (central adiposity). Based on adjusted beta-weights, change in perceived stress (beta = 1.13, p
PubMedId: 17890499
Journal-article: Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 15, 2007
Authors: Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Jennifer S Coelho, Elizabeth Kieffer, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: This study investigates the effects of peer influence on the food intake of overweight and normal-weight children. A mixed factorial design was employed, with children's weight status (overweight vs. normal-weight) as a between-subjects factor, and social context (alone vs. group) as a within-subjects factor. A total of 32 children (n=17 overweight and n=15 normal-weight) between the ages of 6-10 years participated in this study. Findings from the random regression model indicated that overweight children ate more when with others than when alone, while in contrast normal-weight ate more with others than they did when alone. Therefore, social context differentially impacts the eating behavior of overweight and normal-weight children. This study underscores differences in responses to the social environment between overweight and non-overweight youths, and suggests that social involvement may be an important tool in treatment and prevention programs for overweight and obesity.
PubMedId: 17628616
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 92, 2007
Authors: Jodie L Robinson, Janene H Fuerch, Dana D Winiewicz, Sarah J Salvy, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Recruitment of participants for clinical trials requires considerable effort and cost. There is no research on the cost effectiveness of recruitment methods for an obesity prevention trial of young children. This study determined the cost effectiveness of recruiting 70 families with a child aged 4 to 7 (5.9+/-1.3) years in Western New York from February 2003 to November 2004, for a 2-year randomized obesity prevention trial to reduce television watching in the home. Of the 70 randomized families, 65.7% (n=46) were obtained through direct mailings, 24.3% (n=17) were acquired through newspaper advertisements, 7.1% (n=5) from other sources (e.g., word of mouth), and 2.9% (n=2) through posters and brochures. Costs of each recruitment method were computed by adding the cost of materials, staff time, and media expenses. Cost effectiveness (money spent per randomized participant) was US $0 for other sources, US $227.76 for direct mailing, US $546.95 for newspaper ads, and US $3,020.84 for posters and brochures. Of the methods with associated costs, direct mailing was the most cost effective in recruiting families with young children, which supports the growing literature of the effectiveness of direct mailing.
PubMedId: 17475318
Journal-article: Preventive medicine, vol. 44, 2006
Authors: Brian H Wrotniak, Leonard H Epstein, Joan M Dorn, Katherine E Jones, Valerie A Kondilis
Abstract: Youth with better motor abilities may find it easier to be physically active and may be more likely to engage in physical activity compared with peers with poorer motor competence. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between motor proficiency and physical activity in 8- to 10-year-old children. Self-efficacy toward physical activity was also assessed. Sixty-five children (34 girls and 31 boys) were studied. Children's physical activity was assessed by the Manufacturing Technologies Incorporated/Computer Science and Applications Incorporated model 7164 accelerometer, and their motor proficiency was determined by the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency. The Children's Self-Perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilection for Physical Activity scale measured children's self-perceptions of adequacy in performing and desire to participate in physical activities. Children's motor proficiency was positively associated with activity counts and percentage of time in moderate and moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity and inversely related to percentage of time in sedentary activity. Children in the greatest quartile of motor proficiency were the most physically active compared with children with lower levels of motor proficiency who had similar levels of physical activity. Children with greater standardized BMI were less physically active, more sedentary, and had poorer motor proficiency compared with children with a lower standardized BMI. Children's Self-Perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilection for Physical Activity scores were positively associated with Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency standard score for boys. Children's motor proficiency explained an additional 8.7% of the variance in physical activity in multiple linear regression after controlling for factors that may influence physical activity. Motor proficiency is positively associated with physical activity and inversely associated with sedentary activity in children, but there may be a threshold of motor proficiency above which children may be the most physically active. Children's motor proficiency may be an appropriate target for increasing physical activity in youth.
PubMedId: 17142498
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 118, 2006
Authors: James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein, Samina Raja, Li Yin, Jodie Robinson, Dana Winiewicz
Abstract: To determine associations of the neighborhood and home television environments with young children's physical activity. 32 boys and 27 girls age 4 to 7 years wore accelerometers for 3 weekdays and 1 weekend day. The number of televisions in the home and television watching of the child were monitored using TV Allowance units for 3 weeks. A geographic information system was used to measure neighborhood environment variables. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to predict physical activity, initially controlling for sex, age, socioeconomic status, adiposity, and child television watching in step 1. In step 2, the number of televisions did not significantly increase the amount of variability accounted for in the prediction of physical activity. In step 3, housing density and the interaction of housing density by sex accounted for an incremental 12% (p < 0.05) of the variability and in step 4 percentage park plus recreation area accounted for a further 10% (p < 0.05) of the variability. Greater housing density predicted increased physical activity of boys, but not girls. Neighborhoods with increased proximity between homes and a greater proportion of park area are associated with greater physical activity in young children.
PubMedId: 16928396
Journal-article: Preventive medicine, vol. 43, 2006
Authors: Jodie L Robinson, Dana D Winiewicz, Janene H Fuerch, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Many young children have televisions in their bedrooms, which may influence the relationship between parental estimate and objective measures of child television usage/week. Parental estimates of child television time of eighty 4-7 year old children (6.0 +/- 1.2 years) at the 75th BMI percentile or greater (90.8 +/- 6.8 BMI percentile) were compared to an objective measure of television time obtained from TV Allowance devices attached to every television in the home over a three week period. Results showed that parents overestimate their child's television time compared to an objective measure when no television is present in the bedroom by 4 hours/week (25.4 +/- 11.5 vs. 21.4 +/- 9.1) in comparison to underestimating television time by over 3 hours/week (26.5 +/- 17.2 vs. 29.8 +/- 14.4) when the child has a television in their bedroom (p = 0.02). Children with a television in their bedroom spend more objectively measured hours in television time than children without a television in their bedroom (29.8 +/- 14.2 versus 21.4 +/- 9.1, p = 0.003). Research on child television watching should take into account television watching in bedrooms, since it may not be adequately assessed by parental estimates.
PubMedId: 17129381
Journal-article: The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 3, 2006
Authors: M S Faith, E Rose, P E Matz, A Pietrobelli, L H Epstein
Abstract: To illustrate the use and potential efficiency of the co-twin control design for testing behavioral economic theories of child nutrition. Co-twin control design, in which participating twins ate an ad libitum lunch on two laboratory visits. At visit 1, child food choices were not reinforced. On visit 2, twins were randomized to conditions such that one twin was reinforced for each fruit and vegetable serving consumed during lunch ('contingent') while his co-twin was reinforced irrespective of food intake ('non-contingent'). Six male twins, 5 years old, from three monozygotic twin pairs. Ad libitum intake of total energy (kcals), fat (kcals), and fruits and vegetables (servings) from the protocol test meals on the two visits. Compared to twins receiving non-contingent reinforcement, twins receiving contingent reinforcement increased fruit and vegetable intake by 2.0 servings, reduced fat intake 106.3 kcals, and reduced total energy intake by 112.7 kcals. The relative efficiency of the co-twin control design compared to a conventional between-groups design of unrelated children was most powerful for detecting 'substitution effects' (i.e., reduced total energy and fat intake) more so than for detecting increased fruit and vegetable intake. Genetically informative studies, including the co-twin control design, can provide conceptually elegant and efficient strategies for testing environmental theories of child nutrition and obesity.
PubMedId: 16801929
Journal-article: International journal of obesity (2005), vol. 30, 2006
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Samina Raja, Samuel S Gold, Rocco A Paluch, Youngju Pak, James N Roemmich
Abstract: This study was designed to determine whether the characteristics of the neighborhood environment are related to the substitution of physical activity for sedentary behavior among youth. Fifty-eight 8- to 15-year-old youth were studied in a within-subjects crossover design with three phases: baseline, increased sedentary behavior, and decreased sedentary behavior. The relations between changes in physical activity and design, diversity, and density attributes of the neighborhood environment were determined using random coefficient models. Compared with girls, boys showed greater increases in physical activity when sedentary behaviors were reduced and greater decreases in physical activity when sedentary behaviors were increased. Greater access to parks was associated with greater physical activity when sedentary behaviors were reduced.
PubMedId: 16913945
Journal-article: Psychological science, vol. 17, 2006
Authors: J L Temple, B H Wrotniak, R A Paluch, J N Roemmich, L H Epstein
Abstract: To determine if the sex of the participating parent/child pair is a contributing factor in initial weight loss and maintenance within a family-based obesity treatment program. A 2-year family-based obesity treatment program targeting one overweight parent and one overweight child. One overweight parent (body mass index (BMI) > or = 25) and child (> or = 85th BMI percentile) from 164 families. Parameters of body weight, including height, weight, BMI, z-BMI, percent overweight (BOV) at baseline and at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up time points. Children within the opposite-sex dyads had greater weight loss (P < 0.01) at 6- and 12-month time points compared with children in the same-sex dyads. Parents within opposite-sex dyads had significantly greater weight loss at 24 months (P < 0.05) compared with those in the same-sex dyads. When individual dyads were examined, the change in child z-BMI after 6 months was greater for the mother-son dyad as compared to the mother-daughter and father-son (P < 0.05). For parent z-BMI, the mother-daughter dyad consistently exhibited the poorest results. At 6- and 12-month time points, parents in the mother-daughter dyad lost significantly less weight than parents in all other dyads (P < 0.05), and at 24 months, parents in the mother-daughter dyad lost less weight than parents in the opposite-sex dyads (P < 0.05). These data reveal that child-parent sex interactions can strongly influence the outcome of obesity treatment when both parent and child are the target for weight loss. The reasons that underlie this effect remain to be determined.
PubMedId: 16491111
Journal-article: International journal of obesity (2005), vol. 30, 2006
Authors: James N Roemmich, Jacob E Barkley, Leonard H Epstein, Christina L Lobarinas, Tressa M White, Jamee H Foster
Abstract: This study was conducted to test the validity of the Pictorial Children's Effort Rating Table (PCERT) and OMNI walk/run scales. Children (26 boys age 11.2 yr +/- 1.6 and 25 girls age 11.1 yr +/- 1.4) performed a five-stage incremental exertion treadmill test. The undifferentiated perceived exertion from the PCERT and OMNI scales was assessed for construct validity using Pearson correlations with VO(2) and heart rate as criteria and concurrent validity by correlating PCERT and OMNI scores. Increases in PCERT and OMNI scale scores were correlated with increases in VO(2) (r = 0.90 and 0.92) and heart rate (r = 0.89 and 0.92). No difference was found in slope of the PCERT and OMNI scores when regressed against heart rate or VO(2) and the slopes were invariant across sexes. To test concurrent validity of the PCERT and OMNI scales, subject scores at each stage were converted to a percentage of the maximal scale. No effect of sex was noted on perceived exertion (P = 0.32), and the percentage of the maximal PCERT and OMNI scales was almost identical at each stage (P = 0.73). Validity of both the PCERT and OMNI scales was established for submaximal exercise. PCERT and OMNI scores are not interchangeable because they have different scales, but at a given exercise intensity youth assign similar percentages of the maximal scores.
PubMedId: 16672857
Journal-article: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 38, 2006
Authors: Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Natalie Romero, Rocco Paluch, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Although most eating occurs in a social context, the effects of peer influence on child eating have not been the object of systematic experimental study. The present study assesses the effects of peer influence on lean and overweight pre-adolescent girls' snack intake as a function of the co-eaters' weight status. The weight status of the participants was varied by studying weight discordant dyads (i.e., one lean and one overweight participant) and weight concordant dyads (i.e., both members of the dyads were either lean or overweight). Results from the random regression model indicate that overweight girls eating with an overweight peer consumed more kilocalories than overweight participants eating with a normal-weight peer. Normal-weight participants eating with overweight peers ate similar amounts as those eating with lean eating companions. The regression model improved when the partners' food intake was entered in the model, indicating that the peers' intake was a significant predictor of participants' snack consumption. This study underscores differences in responses to the social environment between overweight and non-overweight youths.
PubMedId: 17363109
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 49, 2006
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, Kristine M Kent, April M Giacomelli, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Salivary responses habituate to repeated presentations of food cues, and these responses recover when new food stimuli are presented. Research suggests that within-session changes in motivated responding for food may also habituate, and motivated responding may, therefore, recover when new foods are presented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate similarities in the pattern of salivation and motivated responding for a cheeseburger stimulus in children, followed by either a novel stimulus (French fries) or another cheeseburger trial. The order of the task (salivation or motivation) was counterbalanced over days. Salivation and motivated responding for cheeseburger were reliably reduced over seven trials, and responses recovered after presentation of French fries on trial 8. Random regression models showed a significant relationship between the rate of change in motivated responding and salivation. These results provide additional support for similarities in processes that regulate salivation and motivated responding for food and strengthen support for the hypothesis that changes in motivated responding can be understood by habituation theory.
PubMedId: 16624446
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 46, 2005
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Kelly K Dearing, Elizabeth A Handley, James N Roemmich, Rocco A Paluch
Abstract: To our knowledge, there are no data on parental influences on child purchasing behavior of healthy or unhealthy foods. Mothers and children in ten families were given 5.00 US dollars to purchase portions of preferred fruits/vegetables and high energy-dense snack foods for each of ten trials of price manipulations. For five of the trials the price of the fruit/vegetable increased in price from 0.50 US dollars to 2.50 US dollars (in 0.50 US dollar increments), while the price of the energy-dense snack food remained constant at 1.00 US dollar. For the remaining five trials, the commodity that previously rose in price remained constant at 1.00 US dollars and the other commodity varied from 0.50 US dollars to 2.50 US dollars. Same-price elasticity was shown for both the child and parent purchases, and parent purchases were significantly related to child purchases of both healthy (regression estimate = 0.46, p < 0.001) and unhealthy (regression estimate = 0.12, p = 0.036) foods. Children's purchases of unhealthy snack food items were positively related to family socioeconomic status, and negatively related to child age. These results indicate that parental food choice and purchasing behaviors may play a role in the development of children's purchasing of both healthy and unhealthy foods.
PubMedId: 16682097
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 47, 2005
Authors: Brian H Wrotniak, Leonard H Epstein, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich
Abstract: Better adherence to treatment strategies in family-based behavioral weight control programs may lead to greater weight reduction and improved weight maintenance in youth. This study assessed the influence of child and parent self-reported adherence to behavioral strategies on changes in 2-year child and parent percentage overweight. Participants included 8- to 12-year-old children in >or= 85th BMI percentile and their parents from 110 families taking part in two family-based randomized controlled weight control studies. This study examined whether self-reported adherence to behavioral strategies measured at 24 months increased prediction of child and parent percentage overweight change through 24-month follow-up after accounting for other factors that may influence weight change. Child adherence to weighing and to preplanning for celebrations where high-fat foods are served and parent adherence to praising the child and modeling healthy eating habits predicted 24-month child percentage overweight change (p<0.001). Child adherence to recording food and calories and parent adherence to modeling healthy eating habits predicted 24-month parent percentage overweight change (p<0.001). In hierarchical regression models, child weighing and preplanning and parent modeling were significant (p<0.01) incremental predictors (r2 of 24.8%) of 24-month child percentage overweight. Child recording and parent modeling were significant (p<0.01) incremental predictors (r2 of 14%) of parent 24-month percentage overweight change. Child and parent adherence to specific components of family-based behavioral weight control treatment are independent predictors of long-term child and parent percentage overweight change.
PubMedId: 15976152
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 13, 2005
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich, Rocco A Paluch, Hollie A Raynor
Abstract: Youth may choose to be sedentary rather than physically active. The purpose of this study was to use behavioral economics methods to investigate how experimental changes in the amount of sedentary behaviors influenced physical activity. Fifty-eight 8- to 16-year-old youth were studied in a within-subject crossover design with three 3-week phases: baseline, increasing, and decreasing targeted sedentary behaviors by 25% to 50%. At baseline, boys were more active than girls (518.9 vs. 401.2 accelerometer counts/min, p = .02), and obese youth more sedentary than nonobese youth (240.5 vs. 174.4 min/day, p = .003). During the increase sedentary behavior phase, targeted sedentary behaviors increased by 52.1%, with girls increasing sedentary behaviors more than boys (114.7 vs. 79.8 min/day, p = .04). Physical activity decreased (-48.3 counts/min, p < .01) when sedentary behaviors increased, with obese youth decreasing total and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) more than nonobese youth (-110.4 vs. 8.9 counts/min, p < .001; -3.3 vs. -.03 % MVPA, p = .013). During the decrease sedentary behavior phase, targeted sedentary behaviors decreased by 55.6% from baseline as nonobese youth increased physical activity, whereas obese youth decreased physical activity (55.8 vs. -48.0 counts/min, p = .042; 1.1 vs. -2.1% MVPA, p = .021). Youth who substituted physical activity when sedentary behaviors were increased had greater standardized body mass index (z-body mass index = 1.4 vs. 0.4, p = .018), whereas youth who substituted physical activity when sedentary behaviors were decreased were less active at baseline (396.1 vs. 513.7 counts/min, p = .035). Behavioral economics provides a methodology to understand changes in physical activity when sedentary behaviors are modified and to identify factors associated with substitution of physically active for sedentary behaviors.
PubMedId: 15946114
Journal-article: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 29, 2005
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Elizabeth A Handley, Kelly K Dearing, David D Cho, James N Roemmich, Rocco A Paluch, Samina Raja, Youngju Pak, Bonnie Spring
Abstract: One way to increase choice of healthy over unhealthy behaviors is to increase the cost of less healthy alternatives or reduce the cost of healthier alternatives. The influence of price on purchases of healthy and unhealthy foods was evaluated in two laboratory experiments. In Experiment 1, thirty-two 10- to 12-year-old youth were given $5.00 and allowed to purchase multiple portions of a healthy food (fruit or vegetable) and a less healthy food (higher-fat snack). The price of one type of food varied from $0.50 to $2.50, while the price of the other type was held at $1.00. Increasing the price of a type of food reduced purchases of that type of food, but did not lead to substitution with the alternative type of food. In Experiment 2, twenty 10- to 14-year-old youth were given $1.00, $3.00, and $5.00 to purchase healthy and unhealthy foods. The price of each food was raised and lowered by 25% and 50%. Raising the price of healthy or unhealthy foods resulted in decreased purchases of those foods, and income available interacted with price to predict the pattern of substitution of alternative foods. These results show the potential for controlled laboratory studies of price and food purchases, and show that the substitution of healthier for unhealthy food is related to available money.
PubMedId: 16371148
Journal-article: Psychological science, vol. 17, 2005
Authors: Caryn Lerman, Christopher Jepson, E Paul Wileyto, Leonard H Epstein, Margaret Rukstalis, Freda Patterson, Vyga Kaufmann, Stephanie Restine, Larry Hawk, Ray Niaura, Wade Berrettini
Abstract: Although bupropion and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) are efficacious tobacco dependence treatments, there is substantial interindividual variability in therapeutic response and most smokers relapse. Pharmacogenetics research may improve treatment outcomes by identifying genetic variants predictive of therapeutic response. We investigated the roles of two functional genetic variants in the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene in response to pharmacotherapy for tobacco dependence among participants in two randomized clinical trials with a 6-month follow-up period: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of bupropion (n=414) and an open label trial of transdermal nicotine vs nicotine nasal spray (n=368). At the end of the treatment phase, a statistically significant (p=0.01) interaction between the DRD2 - 141C Ins/Del genotype and treatment indicated a more favorable response to bupropion among smokers homozygous for the Ins C allele compared to those carrying a Del C allele. By contrast, smokers carrying the Del C allele had statistically significantly (p=0.006) higher quit rates on NRT compared to those homozygous for the Ins C allele, independent of NRT type. The C957T variant was also associated (p=0.03) with abstinence following NRT. These results suggest that bupropion may be the preferred pharmacologic treatment for smokers homozygous for the DRD2 - 141 Ins C allele, while NRT may be more beneficial for those who carry the Del C allele. Study findings require confirmation in additional larger samples before they are applied in practice.
PubMedId: 16123753
Journal-article: Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 31, 2005
Authors: Richard I Stein, Leonard H Epstein, Hollie A Raynor, Colleen K Kilanowski, Rocco A Paluch
Abstract: Parenting style was examined as a predictor of weight loss maintenance in behavioral family-based pediatric obesity treatment. Fifty obese children who participated in a behavioral family-based pediatric obesity treatment were studied. Hierarchical regression tested the incremental effect of baseline parenting and parenting during treatment on children's percentage overweight change over 12 months, beyond demographics and adherence to targeted behaviors. Children's percentage overweight significantly decreased at 6 (-16.3) and 12 (-11.1) months. Adherence to program goals significantly increased variance accounted for in the regression model by 10.8%, whereas adding baseline father acceptance and change in father acceptance accounted for another 20.5%. The overall model accounted for 40.6% of the variance in pediatric weight control. ANOVA showed significantly greater percentage overweight decrease from baseline for youth with fathers who increased their acceptance vs. those who decreased acceptance at 6 (-19.8 vs. -14.6) and 12 (-17.4 vs. -8.1) months. Youth who perceive an increase in father acceptance after treatment had better changes in percentage overweight over 12 months than youth with lower ratings of father acceptance. Future directions include examining how other parenting dimensions impact pediatric obesity treatment outcome and how parental acceptance can be enhanced to improve child weight control.
PubMedId: 16286522
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 13, 2005
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich, Richard I Stein, Rocco A Paluch, Colleen K Kilanowski
Abstract: One of the basic principles of behavioral economics interventions is identification of alternative behaviors to compete with the reinforcing value of a highly rewarding commodity. Two experiments that attempt to increase alternatives to eating in obese youth are presented. A randomized, controlled trial was used in Study 1 to compare a comprehensive family-based behavioral treatment program or an experimental treatment that incorporated reinforcing children for engaging in alternative behaviors to eating for 41 overweight 8- to 12-year-old children. Study 2 used a within-subject design with baseline, enriched environment and a second baseline phase to determine the influence of providing activities that compete with eating for 13 overweight 8- to 12-year-old children. Measurements included body mass index (BMI) change, alternatives to eating, eating, and physical activity. In Study 1 both treatments were associated with significant (p < .05) and maintained reductions in z-BMI over the 24 months of observation. The experimental group showed a significantly (p < .05) greater increase in alternatives to eating, and both groups showed significant (p < .05) increases in physical activity. In Study 2 alternative behaviors to eating were increased by almost 1 hr/day (p < .001) but were not associated with significant changes in energy intake or physical activity. These results suggest that using the methods studied, increasing behaviors that could compete with eating did not influence relative weight in a clinical outcome study or energy intake in a controlled field study.
PubMedId: 16336071
Journal-article: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 30, 2005
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich, Frances G Saad, Elizabeth A Handley
Abstract: The choice to be physically active or sedentary depends in part on the value of the alternatives that are available. The shift from sedentary to active alternatives may be a function of the value of the sedentary alternatives. To evaluate the influence of the value of the sedentary alternatives on the choice to be physically active or sedentary, 30 nonobese 8-12-year-old youth were randomized in groups that provided a choice between 4 active alternatives or 4 sedentary alternatives (Group 1), their least valued sedentary activity (Group 2), or their most valued sedentary activity (Group 3), on computerized and questionnaire versions of a behavioral choice task. The computer task required participants to work for access to the alternatives. The work required to obtain access to the active alternatives remained constant for all choices, while the work required to gain access to the sedentary alternatives progressively increased. Compared to Groups 1 and 3, participants in Group 2 chose to be sedentary less often as they had to make a choice between being physically active or sedentary on the computerized (p < .005) and the questionnaire version (p < .05) of the behavioral choice task, which correlated r = .54, p < .01. These results suggest interventions designed to increase physical activity by reducing access to sedentary behaviors may need to consider the value of the targeted sedentary behavior and the extent to which the sedentary behaviors compete with physical activity.
PubMedId: 15657024
Journal-article: International journal of behavioral medicine, vol. 11, 2005
Authors: Gary S. Goldfield, Leonard H. Epstein, Martin Davidson, Frances Saad
Journal-article: Eating Behaviors, vol. 6, pp. 283-292, 2005
Authors: John Leddy, Colleen Nugent, James N. Roemmich, Robbert Salis, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 37, pp. S167, 2005
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, James N Roemmich, Rocco A Paluch, Hollie A Raynor
PubMedId: 15699222
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 81, pp. 361-366, 2005
Authors: John Leddy, Colleen Nugent, James N. Roemmich, Robbert Salis, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 37, pp. S167, 2005
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Suzanne M Wright, Rocco A Paluch, John J Leddy, Larry W Hawk, Jodie L Jaroni, Frances G Saad, Susan Crystal-Mansour, Peter G Shields, Caryn Lerman
PubMedId: 15213032
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 80, pp. 82-88, 2004
Authors: James N Roemmich, Cathy M Gurgol, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 15064595
Clinical Trial: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 36, 2004
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, John J Leddy
Abstract: The reinforcing value of food, measured by how hard someone is willing to work to obtain food, is influenced by food palatability, food deprivation and food variety, and may be a more powerful determinant of food intake than hedonics or liking. The reinforcing value of food is mediated in part by dopaminergic activity. Genotypes that influence dopamine transport and the density of dopamine D2 receptors interact with food reinforcement to influence eating behavior, and D2 receptor genotypes may influence food reinforcement and weight gain after smoking cessation. Inhibition of dopamine transport increases brain dopamine concentrations, which may influence weight gain after smoking cessation and can reduce energy intake in obese adults.
PubMedId: 16257474
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 46, 2004
Authors: Larry W Hawk, Joseph S Baschnagel, Rebecca L Ashare, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Food craving and reactivity to food cues are related to food intake. Research has shown that both startle magnitude and prepulse inhibition of startle may be useful indices of cue reactivity and drug craving. The goal of this study was to assess the utility of these paradigms for the study of food craving in food-deprived participants. Twenty-nine non-smoking, food-deprived undergraduate participants were exposed to a counterbalanced series of food, cigarette, and neutral cues. During each 4.5-min cue, nine startle probes (102-dB white noise) were presented, and a prepulse (20-ms noise 8 dB above background) preceded 2/3 of the probes by 60 or 120 ms. Subjects were divided into those high and low in food-craving on the basis of subjective craving to food cues. Responses to food cues were compared to smoking cues to control for attention and arousal. Both probe-alone startle magnitude and percent prepulse inhibition were significantly reduced during the food cue compared to the smoking cue among high food cravers, but not low food cravers. These processes seemed to be independent, as cue-induced changes in prepulse inhibition were uncorrelated with cue effects on probe-alone startle magnitude. Both probe-alone startle magnitude and prepulse inhibition are sensitive to cue-induced craving for food, but appear to assess separate processes. Startle methodologies may prove useful in understanding basic processes that regulate food intake.
PubMedId: 15527931
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 43, 2004
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Frances G Saad, April M Giacomelli, James N Roemmich
Abstract: Responding to food cues may be disrupted by allocating attention to other tasks. We report two experiments examining the effects of allocation of attention on salivary habituation to olfactory plus visual food cues in 8-12-year-old children. In Experiment 1, 42 children were presented with a series of 8 hamburger food stimulus presentations. During each intertrial interval, participants completed a controlled (hard), or automatic (easy) visual memory task, or no task (control). In Experiment 2, 22 children were presented with 10 presentations of a pizza food stimulus and either listened to an audiobook or no audiobook control. Results of Experiment 1 showed group differences in rate of change in salivation (p=0.014). Children in the controlled task did not habituate to repeated food cues, while children in the automatic (p<0.005) or no task (p<0.001) groups decreased responding over time. In Experiment 2, groups differed in the rate of change in salivation (p=0.004). Children in the no audiobook group habituated (p<0.001), while children in the audiobook group did not habituate. Changes in the rate of habituation when attending to non-food stimuli while eating may be a mechanism for increasing energy intake.
PubMedId: 15708783
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 84, 2004
Authors: Jodie L Jaroni, Suzanne M Wright, Caryn Lerman, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Smokers are less educated and are more likely to discount future rewards than nonsmokers. We assessed the relationship between delay discounting and education level in 77 smokers entering smoking cessation treatment. There was an effect of education on computer task and the questionnaire measures of discounting, with participants having no college discounting delayed rewards significantly (P < .01) more than those attending college. Subjects discounted small rewards more than large rewards for both tasks (P < .001). Results show that education level is inversely associated with discounting in smokers.
PubMedId: 15236819
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 29, 2004
Authors: Janet Audrain-McGovern, Daniel Rodriguez, Kenneth P Tercyak, Leonard H Epstein, Paula Goldman, E Paul Wileyto
Abstract: Adolescents' choice to smoke may depend on substitute reinforcers for smoking, complementary activities to smoking, and individual differences in reinforcer value. The influence of these variables on smoking was determined among 983 adolescents. Substitutes were school involvement, academic performance, physical activity, and sports team participation: complements were peer smoking and substance use; delay discounting assessed individual differences in reinforcer value. Latent growth modeling indicated that substitute reinforcers reduced the odds of smoking progression almost two-fold, complementary reinforcers increased the odds by 1.14. and delay discounting indirectly influenced the odds of smoking progression through complementary reinforcers. Adolescents who smoke may have fewer reinforcers that protect against smoking and more reinforcers that promote smoking. Discounting of future rewards affects smoking through reinforcer type.
PubMedId: 15008687
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 18, 2004
Authors: Bradley N Collins, E Paul Wileyto, Freda Patterson, Margaret Rukstalis, Janet Audrain-McGovern, Vyga Kaufmann, Angela Pinto, Larry Hawk, Raymond Niaura, Leonard H Epstein, Caryn Lerman
Abstract: Among smokers, women may be at greater risk than men for developing smoking-related diseases, perhaps because they have greater difficulty quitting smoking, as suggested by numerous studies. In the present study, we hypothesized that bupropion would reduce this gender disparity among 314 women and 241 men enrolled in a placebo-controlled, randomized trial using behavioral counseling plus 10 weeks of bupropion (300 mg). Prolonged abstinence and biochemically verified point prevalence outcomes were measured at end of treatment (8 weeks after the quit date) and at 6-month follow-up. A logistic regression model of 6-month prolonged abstinence and a Cox regression (survival analysis) model revealed a significant gender by smoking rate by drug interaction and a main effect for marital status. This three-way interaction suggests that bupropion particularly benefited men who smoked more than one pack of cigarettes per day at baseline and, conversely, women who smoked a pack or less. The point prevalence logistic regression model showed no evidence that either gender or smoking rate modified the effect of treatment. These results suggest that bupropion treatment may reduce the gender disparity in prolonged abstinence rates among lighter smokers.
PubMedId: 14982685
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 6, 2004
Authors: E Paul Wileyto, Janet Audrain-McGovern, Leonard H Epstein, Caryn Lerman
PubMedId: 15190698
Journal Article: Behavior research methods, instruments, & computers : a journal of the Psychonomic Society, Inc, vol. 36, 2004
Authors: John J Leddy, Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Jaroni, James N Roemmich, Rocco A Paluch, Gary S Goldfield, Caryn Lerman
Abstract: Rapid synaptic dopamine transport or reduced brain dopamine receptor signaling may influence energy intake. Methylphenidate, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, increases brain synaptic dopamine and produces anorexia, suggesting that it may reduce energy intake. We investigated the effects of two doses of short-acting methylphenidate on energy intake over one meal in obese adult males. Nine obese males (>85th BMI percentile) ingested a placebo or a moderate dose (0.5 mg/kg) or a high dose (1.0 mg/kg) of methylphenidate in a within-subject double-blind acute laboratory study. One hour after ingestion, pizza consumption was measured in a naturalistic laboratory setting. Participants reduced energy intake by 23% for the moderate dose vs. the placebo (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference for the high dose vs. the moderate dose (p > 0.05). Participants consumed 34% fewer kilocalories after ingesting the lowest effective dose of methylphenidate compared with placebo (725.7 +/- 404.5 vs.1095 +/- 271.1 kcal, p < 0.01). Seven of nine subjects responded to the moderate dose. The increase in perceived drug effect above placebo was correlated with the reduction in energy intake for both the moderate (r = -0.85, p = 0.004) and the high (r = -0.75 p = 0.021) doses. Hunger scores were not different across drug doses or placebo before drug administration. Methylphenidate reduced energy intake of a highly palatable food over one meal by one-third in obese adult males. Dopamine transport inhibition may be an effective component of a comprehensive treatment for obesity.
PubMedId: 14981214
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 12, 2004
Authors: E. Paul Wileyto, Janet Audrain-Mcgovern, Leonard H. Epstein, Caryn Lerman
Journal-article: Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, vol. 36, pp. 41-51, 2004
Authors: Brian H Wrotniak, Leonard H Epstein, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich
Abstract: Family-based behavioral weight control treatment involves the parent in the modification of child and parent eating and activity change. To assess if parent standardized body mass index (z-BMI) change predicts child z-BMI change. Secondary data analysis based on parent and child z-BMI changes from 3 family-based, randomized, controlled weight control studies. Hierarchical regression models tested whether parent z-BMI change increased prediction of child z-BMI change through treatment and 24-month follow-up beyond other factors that influence child weight change, such as child age, sex, socioeconomic status, and baseline child and parent z-BMI. Differences in child z-BMI change as a function of quartiles of parental z-BMI change were tested using an analysis of covariance. Pediatric obesity research clinic. Obese 8- to 12-year-old children and their parents from 142 families who participated in family-based weight control programs. Child and parent z-BMI changes over time. Parent z-BMI change significantly predicted child z-BMI change for the 0- to 6-month (P<.001) and 0- to 24-month (P <.009) time points. In hierarchical regression models, parent z-BMI change was a significant incremental predictor of child z-BMI change at 6 and 24 months, with the additional r(2) ranging from 11.6% at 6 months (P <.001) to 3.8% at 24 months (P =.02). Parents in the highest quartile of z-BMI change had children with significantly greater z-BMI change than that of children with parents in the other quartiles (P =.01). Parent z-BMI change is an independent predictor of obese child z-BMI change in family-based behavioral treatment, and youth benefit the most from parents who lose the most weight in family-based behavioral treatments.
PubMedId: 15066873
Journal-article: Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine, vol. 158, 2004
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Frances G Saad, Elizabeth A Handley, James N Roemmich, Larry W Hawk, Frances K McSweeney
PubMedId: 14637327
Clinical Trial: Appetite, vol. 41, 2003
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jerry B Richards, Frances G Saad, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich, Caryn Lerman
PubMedId: 12755457
Comparative Study: Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology, vol. 11, 2003
Authors: Hollie A Raynor, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 12631501
Clinical Trial: Appetite, vol. 40, 2003
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Robin Truesdale, Angela Wojcik, Rocco A Paluch, Hollie A Raynor
PubMedId: 12576119
Clinical Trial: Physiology & behavior, vol. 78, 2003
Authors: Caryn Lerman, Peter G Shields, E Paul Wileyto, Janet Audrain, Larry H Hawk, Angela Pinto, Susan Kucharski, Shiva Krishnan, Ray Niaura, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: This study examined the role of dopaminergic genes in prospective smoking cessation and response to bupropion treatment in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Smokers of European ancestry (N=418) provided blood samples for genetic analysis and received either bupropion or placebo (10 weeks) plus counseling. Assessments included the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) genotype, dopamine transporter (SLC6A3) genotype, demographic factors, and nicotine dependence. Smoking status was verified at the end of treatment (EOT) and at 6-month follow-up. The results provided evidence for a significant DRD2 * SLC6A3 interaction effect on prolonged smoking abstinence and time to relapse at EOT, independent of treatment condition. Such effects were no longer significant at 6-month follow-up, however. These results provide the first evidence from a prospective clinical trial that genes that alter dopamine function may influence smoking cessation and relapse during the treatment phase.
PubMedId: 14570538
Journal-article: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 22, 2003
Authors: Caryn Lerman, Wade Berrettini, Angela Pinto, Freda Patterson, Susan Crystal-Mansour, E Paul Wileyto, Stephanie L Restine, Debra G B Leonard, Peter G Shields, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Despite the high prevalence and public health significance of weight gain following smoking cessation, little is known about the underlying bio-behavioral mechanisms or effective therapies. We evaluated the effects of bupropion on food reward following smoking abstinence and the moderating influence of genotype. Seventy-one smokers of European ancestry were genotyped for the dopamine D2 receptor ( DRD2) Taq1 polymorphism and randomized to treatment with bupropion (300 mg) or placebo for smoking cessation. Subjects participated in two behavioral laboratory sessions during which the rewarding value of food was assessed using a behavioral economics measure: session 1 occurred prior to medication and before cessation of smoking; session 2 occurred following 3 weeks of medication and 1 week of sustained abstinence. Carriers of the DRD2 A1 minor allele exhibited significant increases in the rewarding value of food following abstinence from smoking, and these effects were attenuated by bupropion treatment ( P=0.03 for medication by genotype interaction). Further, higher levels of food reward at session 2 (post-quit) predicted a significant increase in weight by 6-month follow-up in the placebo group, but not in the bupropion-treated group ( P=0.006 for medication by food reward interaction). These results provide new evidence that the increase in body weight that occurs following smoking cessation is related to increases in food reward, and that food reward is partly determined by genetic factors. Bupropion's efficacy in attenuating abstinence-induced weight gain may be attributable, in part, to decreasing food reward.
PubMedId: 15138759
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 174, 2003
Authors: Hollie A Raynor, Leonard H Epstein
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 40, pp. 15-24, 2003
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Frances G Saad, Elizabeth A Handley, James N Roemmich, Larry W Hawk, Frances K McSweeney
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 41, pp. 283-289, 2003
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Robin Truesdale, Angela Wojcik, Rocco A Paluch, Hollie A Raynor
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 78, pp. 221-227, 2003
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Jerry B. Richards, Frances G. Saad, Rocco A. Paluch, James N. Roemmich, Caryn Lerman
Journal-article: Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 11, pp. 131-138, 2003
Authors: James N Roemmich, Catherine M Gurgol, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: To determine whether interpersonal stress reduces youths' motivation to exercise in a laboratory setting. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured in boys and girls across a control day, after reading children's magazines, and on a stress day, after giving a videotaped speech. For one analysis, children were divided into low (n = 12) and high (n = 13) heart-rate reactivity groups based on changes in heart rate to stress. In a second analysis, children were divided into low and high perceived level of stress based on changes in perceived stress. To determine differences in choice of exercise or sedentary behavior across the control and stress conditions, subjects chose either to exercise for progressively longer periods to earn a monetary reinforcer or to engage in a high-rated sedentary behavior. The choice to exercise was influenced by stress reactivity differently in the stress and control conditions. Low heart-rate reactive children participated in similar (p > 0.50) amounts of exercise on the stress and control days, but high heart-rate reactive children participated in less (p < 0.01) exercise (22.0 +/- 2.5 vs. 26.3 +/- 2.2 minutes) on the stress than control days. When grouped by change in perceived stress, there were no group differences, but subjects exercised longer (p < 0.01) on the control day than the stress day. Interpersonal stress decreased exercise in children susceptible to interpersonal stress. Stress-induced alterations in health behaviors may lead to weight gain in children.
PubMedId: 12972678
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 11, 2003
Authors: Caryn Lerman, Peter G Shields, E Paul Wileyto, Janet Audrain, Angela Pinto, Larry Hawk, Shiva Krishnan, Ray Niaura, Leonard Epstein
PubMedId: 12439223
Clinical Trial: Pharmacogenetics, vol. 12, 2002
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Jaroni, Rocco A Paluch, John J Leddy, Holly E Vahue, Larry Hawk, E Paul Wileyto, Peter G Shields, Caryn Lerman
Abstract: To assess the association between a polymorphism related to dopamine function, dopamine transport (SLC6A3), and obesity in smokers. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between this genetic polymorphism and obesity (body mass index > or = 30 kg/m(2)) from a sample of 510 smokers who smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day and who were participating in a study designed to examine genetic and nongenetic predictors of response to a pharmacological treatment. The likelihood of obesity in African Americans (N = 90) with the 10/10 SLC6A3 genotype was 5.16 times that of African Americans with 9/9 or 9/10 SLC6A3 genotypes (odds ratio = 5.16, confidence interval = 1.60 to 16.65). There was no association of the SLC6A3 genotype with obesity for non-Hispanic whites (N = 420). These results suggest that variants of the dopamine transporter gene may be related to obesity in African-American smokers. Possible mechanisms responsible for the association between dopamine transport and obesity in African-American smokers are discussed.
PubMedId: 12490667
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 10, 2002
Authors: Hollie A Raynor, Colleen K Kilanowski, Irina Esterlis, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 12008989
Clinical Trial: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 102, 2002
Authors: Gary S Goldfield, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 12027037
Journal Article: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 21, 2002
Authors: Caryn Lerman, David Roth, Vyga Kaufmann, Janet Audrain, Larry Hawk, Aiyi Liu, Ray Niaura, Leonard Epstein
PubMedId: 12095672
Clinical Trial: Drug and alcohol dependence, vol. 67, 2002
Authors: Gary S. Goldfield, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 21, pp. 299-303, 2002
Authors: L H Epstein, M D Myers, H A Raynor, B E Saelens
PubMedId: 12224662
Comparative Study: Pediatrics, vol. 101, 2002
Authors: Gary S. Goldfield, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 21, pp. 299-303, 2002
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Rocco A Paluch, Angela Consalvi, Kristy Riordan, Tammy Scholl
Abstract: Sedentary behaviors have been correlated with obesity. We investigated whether changes in sedentary behaviors relate to changes in energy intake and/or physical activity. Experimental within-subject crossover design in which children participated in three 3-week phases: baseline and increased and decreased targeted sedentary behaviors. Thirteen 8- to 12-year-old, nonobese children. Sedentary behaviors were measured through the use of daily activity logs, physical activity measured with accelerometers, and energy intake measured by means of repeated 24-hour recalls collected during each phase. Energy intake, energy expenditure, and energy balance per day were calculated. Children showed significant (P <.001) increases of 50% and decreases of 53% in targeted sedentary behaviors from baseline during the increase and decrease phases, respectively. There was a significant (P =.05) increase in energy balance per day (+350.7 kcal) when sedentary behaviors were increased, as the result of an increase in energy intake per day (+250.9 kcal) and a decrease in energy expenditure (-99.8 kcal). No significant changes in energy balance were observed when sedentary behaviors were decreased. Increasing sedentary behaviors had a greater influence on physical activity and energy intake than reducing sedentary behavior in nonobese youth. In some children, changes in sedentary behaviors may be important to modify energy balance and prevent obesity.
PubMedId: 11953732
Journal-article: The Journal of pediatrics, vol. 140, 2002
Authors: James N Roemmich, Suzanne M Wright, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: To determine whether dietary restraint modifies stress-induced eating in youth. Snacking was measured in boys (9.5 +/- 0.3 years) and girls (9.0 +/- 0.3 years), with and without dietary restraint, across a control day after reading children's magazines and/or coloring, and on a stress day after giving a videotaped speech, with order of conditions counterbalanced. Children were divided into four groups based on dietary restraint and changes in perceived stress: low-restraint/low-reactive (n = 9), low-restraint/high-reactive (n = 13), high-restraint/low-reactive (n = 10), and high-restraint/high-reactive (n = 8). Body composition was estimated by skinfolds. Energy intake of snack foods was influenced differently by dietary restraint and stress reactivity in the stress and control conditions (p < 0.01). After being stressed, low-restraint/low-reactive children ate fewer snacks and high-restraint/high-reactive children ate more snacks compared with the control condition. After covarying for percentage of body fat, the interactions remained (p < 0.01). Girls ate less than boys (p < 0.001), but sex did not influence eating in control and stress conditions. Dietary restraint occurs in children and may influence the effect of stress on eating. Interpersonal stress decreases snacking in low dietary restrained youth but increases snacking in high dietary restrained children, perhaps because of stress-induced disinhibition.
PubMedId: 12429875
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 10, 2002
Authors: Michelle Myers Ernst, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Habituation to repeated food stimuli has been demonstrated in various response systems across animals and humans. Patterns of responding to obtain food demonstrate many empirical characteristics of habituation, and the purpose of the present study was to determine whether motivated responding for food in humans follows an habituation pattern. Thirty-five nonobese men were randomized to groups in which they responded to gain access to repeated presentations of the same food or presentations of a variety of isocaloric food. Subjective ratings of food liking and hunger were assessed. Consistent with habituation theory, participants working for one type of food demonstrated a more rapid decrease in responding for food and in ratings of liking of the repeatedly presented food than participants working for varied foods. All participants showed similar reductions of hunger and resumed responding for a novel food stimulus. This study documents that motivated responding for food in human shares characteristics of an habituation process.
PubMedId: 12071689
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 38, 2002
Authors: Caryn Lerman, Peter G Shields, E Paul Wileyto, Janet Audrain, Angela Pinto, Larry Hawk, Shiva Krishnan, Ray Niaura, Leonard Epstein
Journal-article: Pharmacogenetics, vol. 12, pp. 627-634, 2002
Authors: Caryn Lerman, David Roth, Vyga Kaufmann, Janet Audrain, Larry Hawk, Aiyi Liu, Ray Niaura, Leonard Epstein
Journal-article: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 67, pp. 219-223, 2002
Authors: J N Roemmich, P A Clark, M Lusk, A Friel, A Weltman, L H Epstein, A D Rogol
Abstract: To investigate the independent influence of alterations in fat mass, body fat distribution and hormone release on pubertal increases in fasting serum insulin concentrations and on insulin resistance assessed by the homeostasis model (HOMA). Cross-sectional investigation of pre- (n=11, n=8), mid- (n=10, n=11), and late-pubertal (n=10, n=11) boys and girls with normal body weight and growth velocity. Body composition (by a four-compartment model), abdominal fat distribution and mid-thigh interfascicular plus intermuscle (extramyocellular) fat (by magnetic resonance imaging), total body subcutaneous fat (by skinfolds), mean nocturnal growth hormone (GH) release and 06:00 h samples of serum insulin, sex steroids, leptin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Pubertal insulin resistance was suggested by greater (P<0.001) fasting serum insulin concentrations in the late-pubertal than pre- and mid-pubertal groups while serum glucose concentrations were unchanged and greater (P<0.001) HOMA values in late-pubertal than pre- and mid-pubertal youth. From univariate correlation fat mass was most related to HOMA (r=0.59, P<0.001). Two hierarchical regression models were developed to predict HOMA. In one approach, subject differences in sex, pubertal maturation, height and weight were held constant by adding these variables as a block in the first step of the model (r(2)=0.36). Sequential addition of fat mass (FM) increased r(2) (r(2)((inc)remental)=0.08, r(2)=0.44, P<0.05) as did the subsequent addition of a block of fat distribution variables (extramyocellular fat, abdominal visceral fat, and sum of skinfolds; r(2)(inc)=0.11, r(2)=0.55, P<0.05). Sequential addition of a block of hormone variables (serum IGF-I and log((10)) leptin concentrations; r(2)(inc)=0.04, P>0.05) did not reliably improve r(2) beyond the physical characteristic and adiposity variables. In a second model, differences in sex and pubertal maturation were again held constant (r(2)=0.25), but body size differences were accounted for using percentage fat data. Sequential addition of percentage body fat (r(2)((inc)remental)=0.11, r(2)=0.36, P<0.05), then a block of fat distribution variables (percentage extramyocellular fat, percentage abdominal visceral fat, and percentage abdominal subcutaneous fat; r(2)(inc)=0.08, r(2)=0.44, P=0.058), and then a block of serum IGF-I and log((10)) leptin concentrations (r(2)(inc)=0.07, r(2)=0.51, P<0.05) increased r(2). Mean nocturnal GH release was not related to HOMA (r=-0.04, P=0.75) and therefore was not included in the hierarchical regression models. Increases in insulin resistance at puberty were most related to FM. Accumulation of fat in the abdominal visceral, subcutaneous and muscular compartments may increase insulin resistance at puberty beyond that due to total body fat. Serum concentrations of leptin and IGF-I may further modulate HOMA beyond the effects of adiposity and fat distribution. However, the results are limited by the cross-sectional design and the use of HOMA rather than a criterion measure of insulin resistance.
PubMedId: 12032756
Journal-article: International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 26, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, J N Roemmich
PubMedId: 11474956
Journal Article: Exercise and sport sciences reviews, vol. 29, 2001
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, James N. Roemmich
Journal-article: Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, vol. 29, pp. 103-108, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, J N Roemmich, H A Raynor
PubMedId: 11494647
Journal Article: Pediatric clinics of North America, vol. 48, 2001
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, James N. Roemmich, Hollie A. Raynor
Journal-article: Pediatric Clinics of North America, vol. 48, pp. 981-993, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, R A Paluch, L E Kalakanis, G S Goldfield, F J Cerny, J N Roemmich
PubMedId: 11533362
Comparative Study: Pediatrics, vol. 108, 2001
Authors: L. H. Epstein, R. A. Paluch, L. E. Kalakanis, G. S. Goldfield, F. J. Cerny, J. N. Roemmich
Journal-article: PEDIATRICS, vol. 108, pp. e44-e44, 2001
Authors: Hollie A. Raynor, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Psychological Bulletin, vol. 127, pp. 325-341, 2001
Authors: H A Raynor, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 11393299
Journal Article: Psychological bulletin, vol. 127, 2001
Authors: M. S. Faith, N. Berman, M. Heo, A. Pietrobelli, D. Gallagher, L. H. Epstein, M. T. Eiden, D. B. Allison
Journal-article: PEDIATRICS, vol. 107, pp. 1043-1048, 2001
Authors: M S Faith, N Berman, M Heo, A Pietrobelli, D Gallagher, L H Epstein, M T Eiden, D B Allison
PubMedId: 11331684
Clinical Trial: Pediatrics, vol. 107, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, C C Gordy, H A Raynor, M Beddome, C K Kilanowski, R Paluch
Abstract: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of a parent-focused behavioral intervention on parent and child eating changes and on percentage of overweight changes in families that contain at least one obese parent and a non-obese child. Families with obese parents and non-obese children were randomized to groups in which parents were provided a comprehensive behavioral weight-control program and were encouraged to increase fruit and vegetable intake or decrease intake of high-fat/high-sugar foods. Child materials targeted the same dietary changes as their parents without caloric restriction. Changes over 1 year showed that treatment influenced targeted parent and child fruit and vegetable intake and high-fat/high-sugar intake, with the Increase Fruit and Vegetable group also decreasing their consumption of high-fat/high-sugar foods. Parents in the increased fruit and vegetable group showed significantly greater decreases in percentage of overweight than parents in the decreased high-fat/high-sugar group. These results suggest that focusing on increasing intake of healthy foods may be a useful approach for nutritional change in obese parents and their children.
PubMedId: 11323442
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 9, 2001
Authors: K J. Coleman, L H. Epstein
Journal-article: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 33, pp. S231, 2001
Authors: Hollie A. Raynor, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Psychological Bulletin, vol. 127, pp. 325-341, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, R A Paluch, B E Saelens, M M Ernst, D E Wilfley
Abstract: To evaluate the effects of behavioral, family-based treatment on disordered eating and child behavior problems for obese 8- to 12-year-old children. We examined disordered eating in children and parents using the Kids' Eating Disorder Survey (KEDS) and the Binge Eating Scale, respectively; and psychologic problems in children and their parents using the Child Behavior Checklist and Symptom Checklist-90, respectively, in 47 families who participated in a family-based obesity treatment program. Obese children showed significant decreases (-12.5 +/- 13.5) in percent overweight, internalizing problems (-7.0 +/- 7.3), and total behavior problems (-4.8 +/- 6.6) and increases in behavioral competence (3.7 +/- 5.0) over 2 years of measurement; and their parents showed significant decreases in weight (-5.0 +/- 8.3 kg) and reductions in parental distress (-2.3 +/- 7.6) and in disturbed eating and weight-related cognition (-3.2 +/- 5.3). No significant changes were observed in total KEDS (-0.2 +/- 1.9), weight dissatisfaction (-0.3 +/- 1.7), or purging/restricting (0.2 +/- 0.6) scores. Decreases in total KEDS were related to decreases in total behavior problems and externalizing behavior problems. These results document improvements in child behavior problems and competence and no change in symptoms of disordered eating in a standardized behavioral weight control program.
PubMedId: 11445795
Journal-article: The Journal of pediatrics, vol. 139, 2001
Authors: C Lerman, J Audrain, K Tercyak, L W Hawk, A Bush, S Crystal-Mansour, C Rose, R Niaura, L H Epstein
Abstract: Previous research has suggested an increased liability to smoking among individuals with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This link is thought to be attributable, in part, to nicotine's beneficial effects on attention and performance. In the present study, we examined the association of ADHD symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity with smoking behavior in a sample of 226 male and female smokers ages 18 and older who were enrolled in a smoking-cessation program. Prior to treatment, they completed measures of ADHD symptoms and standardized measures of smoking patterns. Hierarchical linear regression models were used to characterize the smoking patterns associated with ADHD inattention and hyperactivity symptoms, controlling for potential confounder variables. Smoking for stimulation purposes and the urge to smoke to minimize withdrawal symptoms were the primary patterns associated with ADHD inattention symptoms, while hyperactivity symptoms were not associated with smoking patterns. Consistent with a self-medication hypothesis, these results suggest that smokers with frequent symptoms of inattention may use nicotine as a stimulant drug to help manage these symptoms. Future studies of the role of inattention symptoms in response to smoking treatment are warranted.
PubMedId: 11694203
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 3, 2001
Authors: L E Kalakanis, G S Goldfield, R A Paluch, L H Epstein
Abstract: The purposes of this study were to measure the level and pattern of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA = > 4.5 METs) and examine predictors of activity in obese children. Fifty-one 8-12-year-old children seeking obesity treatment wore accelerometers for 3 or 4 days. Children averaged 12.2 bouts of MVPA per day that lasted an average of 4.2 min, while parents engaged in 3.9 bouts of MVPA that lasted 4.2 min. Hierarchical regression models showed parent activity improved the prediction of obese children's activity levels and the number of bouts of MVPA but not the duration of MVPA. These results suggest that programs to increase physical activity in obese children should structure the activity in short bouts and attempt to increase parental physical activity.
PubMedId: 11561385
Journal-article: Research quarterly for exercise and sport, vol. 72, 2001
Authors: G S Goldfield, L H Epstein, C K Kilanowski, R A Paluch, B Kogut-Bossler
Abstract: Family-based, behavioral treatment has been shown to be an effective intervention for the management of pediatric obesity. The goal of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of two protocols for the delivery of family-based behavioral treatment. Thirty-one families with obese children were randomized to groups in which families were provided mixed treatment incorporating both group and individualized treatment vs group treatment only. Cost-effectiveness of treatment was defined as the magnitude of reduction in standardized BMI and percentage overweight per dollar spent for recruitment and treatment. Anthropometric data were assessed at baseline, 6 months and 12 months post-randomization. Results for the 24 families with complete data showed the group intervention was significantly more cost-effective than the mixed treatment. This was due to the similarity between the two groups in Z-BMI or percentage overweight change for children and their parents, while the mixed treatment was significantly more expensive to deliver than the group treatment. These findings suggest that a family-based, behavioral intervention employing group treatment alone is a more cost-effective approach to treating pediatric obesity than a mixed group plus individual format.
PubMedId: 11781766
Journal-article: International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 25, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, R A Paluch, H A Raynor
Abstract: The primary goal was to evaluate sex differences in child weight control programs that targeted increasing physical activity (increase) or the combination of reducing sedentary behavior and increasing physical activity (combined). A second goal was to evaluate the benefits of family-based interventions on nontargeted siblings. Sixty-seven families with obese children and 89 siblings were randomized to interventions that targeted increasing physical activity (increase) or the combination of reducing sedentary behavior and increasing physical activity (combined). Targeted participants and nontargeted siblings were followed for 1 year. At 12 months, boys showed significantly better percentages of overweight changes (-15.8%) for the combined treatment than girls (-1.0%), with no significant differences for the increase intervention for boys (-9.3%) or girls (-7.6%). Boys adhered to treatment better than girls (p < 0.01). Adherence and predilection for physical activity were significant predictors of targeted child weight loss at 1 year in multiple regression analysis. Predictors of sibling weight loss included age, number of siblings, targeted child percentage of overweight change, and the interaction of group assignment by same sex of treated sibling. Gender may influence response to programs that attempt to decrease sedentary behavior, and generalization of treatment effects to siblings may depend on the intervention and characteristics of the siblings.
PubMedId: 11743058
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 9, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, Y W Wu, R A Paluch, F J Cerny, J P Dorn
Abstract: Clinical research has shown an increased prevalence of obesity in children with asthma. This study was designed to assess the relationship between asthma and pediatric body mass index (BMI) in a national database and to examine factors that may modify this relationship. The cross-sectional relationship between asthma and pediatric BMI and obesity (BMI > or = 85th percentile) was studied. Variables that may influence the relationship between asthma and pediatric BMI, such as race/ethnicity and television watching were included in the model for the total sample. A smaller sample of 3,009 white and African American youth were studied in regression models including maternal BMI. A nationally representative cross-sectional sample of 5154 children and adolescents of 6 to 16 years of age from the Third National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey. In the full sample, asthma and television watching were related to BMI, accounting for 3% of the variance in BMI. When maternal BMI was included in the non-Hispanic sample, television watching, maternal BMI, and the interaction of maternal BMI and asthma were related to youth BMI, accounting for 15% of the variance. The standardized BMI z-score for those youth without asthma and no maternal obesity was 0.06, which increased to 0.33 if the youth had asthma, to 0.70 if the youth did not have asthma but the mother was obese, and to 1.71 if the youth had asthma and the mother was obese. Asthma, television watching, and maternal BMI were independent predictors of youth obesity. BMI and prevalence of obesity is higher in youth with asthma. Pediatric BMI, but not obesity, is also related to the interaction of asthma and maternal BMI in white and African American youth. Comorbidity of asthma and obesity may complicate treatment of either condition, and prevention of obesity should be encouraged for asthmatic children.
PubMedId: 11156433
Journal-article: Obesity research, vol. 8, 2001
Authors: L H Epstein, R A Paluch, C C Gordy, J Dorn
PubMedId: 10710017
Clinical Trial: Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine, vol. 154, 2000
Authors: L H Epstein, C K Kilanowski, A R Consalvi, R A Paluch
PubMedId: 10619533
Journal Article: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 18, 2000
Authors: G S Goldfield, L E Kalakanis, M M Ernst, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 10918536
Clinical Trial: International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 24, 2000
Authors: B E Saelens, M M Ernst, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 10744853
Journal Article: The International journal of eating disorders, vol. 27, 2000
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Rocco A. Paluch, Constance C. Gordy, Joan Dorn
Journal-article: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 154, pp. 220, 2000
Authors: Brian E. Saelens, Michelle M. Ernst, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 27, pp. 459-463, 2000
Authors: Hollie A Raynor, Leonard H Epstein
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 70, pp. 465-470, 2000
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Rocco A. Paluch, Constance C. Gordy, Brian E. Saelens, Michelle M. Ernst
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 68, pp. 717-721, 2000
Authors: H A Raynor, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 11110999
Clinical Trial: Physiology & behavior, vol. 70, 2000
Authors: L H Epstein, R A Paluch, C C Gordy, B E Saelens, M M Ernst
PubMedId: 10965646
Clinical Trial: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 68, 2000
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Rocco A. Paluch, Constance C. Gordy, Brian E. Saelens, Michelle M. Ernst
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 68, pp. 717-721, 2000
Authors: GS Goldfield, LE Kalakanis, MM Ernst, LH Epstein
Journal-article: International Journal of Obesity, vol. 24, pp. 888-892, 2000
Authors: L H Epstein, G S Goldfield
PubMedId: 10593527
Journal Article: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 31, 1999
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Colleen K. Kilanowski, Angela R. Consalvi, Rocco A. Paluch
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 18, pp. 599-603, 1999
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Colleen K. Kilanowski, Angela R. Consalvi, Rocco A. Paluch
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 18, pp. 599-603, 1999
Authors: J P Dorn, F J Cerny, L H Epstein, J Naughton, J E Vena, W Winkelstein, E Schisterman, M Trevisan
PubMedId: 10475536
Journal Article: Annals of epidemiology, vol. 9, 1999
Authors: Joan P Dorn, Frank J Cerny, Leonard H Epstein, John Naughton, John E Vena, Warren Winkelstein, Enrique Schisterman, Maurizio Trevisan
Journal-article: Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 9, pp. 366-373, 1999
Authors: Colleen K. Kilanowski, Angela R. Consalvi, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Pediatric Exercise Science, vol. 11, pp. 63-68, 1999
Authors: K J Coleman, H R Raynor, D M Mueller, F J Cerny, J M Dorn, L H Epstein
Abstract: This study was designed to test different ways of meeting the new ACSM/CDC recommendations for physical activity stating that all Americans at least 2 years of age should obtain 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity on most days of the week. Thirty-two sedentary 18- to 55-year-old adults were randomly assigned to three groups of brisk walking/6 days per week: 30 continuous minutes, three 10-minute bouts, and 30 minutes in any combination of bouts as long as each bout was at least 5 minutes. Aerobic fitness, blood pressure, body composition, and physical activity were assessed at baseline, at end of program (16 weeks), and at follow-up (32 weeks). All groups significantly (P
PubMedId: 10329342
Journal-article: Preventive medicine, vol. 28, 1999
Authors: S E McCallum, A R Caggiula, L H Epstein, S Saylor, T Ploskina, A F Sved
PubMedId: 10027516
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 141, 1999
Authors: Sarah E. McCallum, A. R. Caggiula, Leonard H. Epstein, Saundra Saylor, Thomas Ploskina, Alan F. Sved
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 141, pp. 332-338, 1999
Authors: K J Coleman, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 9532623
Journal-article: Research quarterly for exercise and sport, vol. 69, 1998
Authors: D A Raynor, K J Coleman, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 9532630
Journal-article: Research quarterly for exercise and sport, vol. 69, 1998
Authors: J Gennuso, L H Epstein, R A Paluch, F Cerny
PubMedId: 9856429
Journal Article: Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine, vol. 152, 1998
Authors: M D Myers, H A Raynor, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 9743030
Journal Article: Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine, vol. 152, 1998
Authors: Jennifer Gennuso, Leonard H. Epstein, Rocco A. Paluch, Frank Cerny
Journal-article: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 152, 1998
Authors: Michelle D. Myers, Hollie A. Raynor, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 152, 1998
Authors: A R Caggiula, E C Donny, L H Epstein, A F Sved, S Knopf, C Rose, C G McAllister, S M Antelman, K A Perkins
PubMedId: 9621395
Journal Article: Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 23, 1998
Authors: Anthony R. Caggiula, Eric C. Donny, Leonard H. Epstein, Alan F. Sved, Steve Knopf, Christine Rose, Cathy G. McAllister, Seymour M. Antelman, Kenneth A. Perkins
Journal-article: Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 23, pp. 143-159, 1998
Authors: L H Epstein, R A Paluch
Abstract: We have shown in a series of studies that the human salivary response habituates to repeated presentation of gustatory cues. Parallel animal research has shown that mouthing and food acceptance also habituate. Facial expressions represent a complex response pattern in animals and humans that may provide an objective measurement of motivation to eat. The current study assessed whether facial muscles (orbicularis oris region, risorius region, and zygomaticus region) that regulate mouthing habituate to repeated presentations of a small amount (3 kcal) of a pleasant tasting food stimulus. Participants were randomly assigned to groups that received ten presentations of the same or changing taste stimuli. Following these trials all subjects were presented a novel dishabituating stimulus followed by the habituating stimulus. Integrated facial electromyography EMG responses over each region were measured for a 50 second period following the taste stimulus. Results showed differential habituation rates across the two groups, with participants in the repeated taste group showing decreases in contrast to the changing taste group who did not decrease. The participants in the repeated taste group showed dishabituation of these responses. These results systematically replicate basic animal research, and extend the number of responses related to eating in humans that habituate to repeated food presentations.
PubMedId: 9344429
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 29, 1997
Authors: M D Myers, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 9226356
Clinical Trial: Physiology & behavior, vol. 62, 1997
Authors: L H Epstein, B E Saelens, M D Myers, D Vito
PubMedId: 9269880
Clinical Trial: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 16, 1997
Authors: L H Epstein, R Paluch, J D Smith, M Sayette
PubMedId: 9009809
Journal Article: Psychophysiology, vol. 34, 1997
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Brian E. Saelens, Michelle D. Myers, Dominica Vito
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 16, pp. 107-113, 1997
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Brian E. Saelens, Michelle D. Myers, Dominica Vito
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 16, pp. 107-113, 1997
Authors: Karen J. Coleman, Rocco A. Paluch, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, vol. 29, pp. 286-290, 1997
Authors: K J Coleman, B E Saelens, M D Wiedrich-Smith, J D Finn, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 9372493
Journal Article: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 29, 1997
Authors: Michelle D Myers, Leonard H Epstein
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 62, pp. 155-161, 1997
Authors: L H Epstein, M D Myers, K Anderson
PubMedId: 8787939
Journal Article: Obesity research, vol. 4, 1996
Authors: L H Epstein, K J Coleman, M D Myers
PubMedId: 8778547
Journal Article: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 28, 1996
Authors: L H Epstein, R Paluch, K J Coleman
PubMedId: 8849634
Comparative Study: Psychosomatic medicine, vol. 58, 1996
Authors: L H Epstein, R A Paluch, K J Coleman, D Vito, K Anderson
PubMedId: 8883004
Journal Article: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 28, 1996
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Rocco Paluch, Karen J. Coleman
Journal-article: Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 58, pp. 160-164, 1996
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Michelle D. Myers, Katarina Anderson
Journal-article: Obesity Research, vol. 4, pp. 65-74, 1996
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Carolyn Fonte, Shari L. Mitchell, James E. Grobe
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 57, pp. 675-680, 1995
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, C Fonte, S L Mitchell, J E Grobe
PubMedId: 7777602
Clinical Trial: Physiology & behavior, vol. 57, 1995
Authors: A. R. Caggiula, L. H. Epstein, S. M. Antelman, S. Knopf, K. A. Perkins, S. Saylor, E. Donny, R. Stiller
Book-chapter: Effects of Nicotine on Biological Systems II, pp. 101-107, 1995
Authors: A R Caggiula, L H Epstein, K A Perkins, S Saylor
PubMedId: 8748400
Comparative Study: Psychopharmacology, vol. 122, 1995
Authors: A. R. Caggiula, K. A. Perkins, S. Saylor, L. H. Epstein
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 122, pp. 301-306, 1995
Authors: K A Perkins, S L Mitchell, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 7568442
Clinical Trial: Physiology & behavior, vol. 58, 1995
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Shari L. Mitchell, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 58, pp. 373-378, 1995
Authors: S. L. Cruz, J. E. Villarreal, R. Chahine, T. Kubo, R. Fukumori, K. Taguchi, Y. Hagiwara, F. J.-P. Miao, P. G. Green, W. J??nig, N. L. Benowitz, J. D. Levine, L.-Y. Lee, J.-L. Hong, A. McLaren, C. G. Li, M. J. Rand, R. T. Dowell, A. A. Houdi, J. N. Diana, D. Wong, C. W. Ogle, S. Knopf, A. R. Caggiula, C. G. McAllister, L. H. Epstein, S. M. Antelman, K. A. Perkins, S. Saylor, R. Stiller, A. Buske-Kirschbaum, L. Grota, C. Kirschbaum, T. Bienen, J. Moynihan, R. Ader, D. H. Hellhammer, D. L. Felten, E. N. Grunberg, J. B. Acri, E. J. Pooke
Book-chapter: Experientia Supplementum, pp. 48-53, 1994
Authors: A. R. Caggiula, L. H. Epstein, K. A. Perkins, S. Savlor, A. A. Houdi, M. Welch, V. K. Zbuzek, T. Glasser, W. Wu, E. J. Popke, N. E. Grunberg, Domenico Meloni, Tim Koves John Robinson, Steven I. Dworkin, C. E. Birrell, D. J. K. Balfour, O. Blomqvist, D. Johnson, J. A. Engel, B. S??derpalm, C. Ghelardini, N. Galeotti, P. Malmberg-Aiello, A. Giotti, A. Bartolini, Mohammed Shoaib, Eric Thorndike, Steven R. Goldberg, Charles W. Schindler
Book-chapter: Experientia Supplementum, pp. 57-60, 1994
Authors: M. J. Marks, S. R. Grady, S. F. Robinson, A. E. Bullock, A. C. Collins, P. M. Lippiello, M. Bencherif, R. J. Prince, S. Wonnacott, K. J. Kellar, M. I. D??vila-Garc??a, Y. Xiao, R. A. Houghtling, R. D. Mellon, S. S. Qasba, C. M. Flores, A. R. Cagglula, L. H. Epstein, S. M. Antelman, S. Knopf, K. A. Perkins, S. Saylor, E. Donny, R. Stiller
Book-chapter: Experientia Supplementum, pp. 6-7, 1994
Authors: K A Perkins, J E Sexton, L H Epstein, A DiMarco, C Fonte, R L Stiller, A Scierka, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 8074059
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 60, pp. 312-319, 1994
Authors: Cathy G. McAllister, Anthony R. Caggiula, Steven Knopf, Leonard H. Epstein, Anna L. Miller, Seymour M. Antelman, Kenneth A. Perkins
Journal-article: Journal of Neuroimmunology, vol. 50, pp. 43-49, 1994
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, James Grobe, Carolyn Fonte
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 47, pp. 107-112, 1994
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, J Grobe, C Fonte
PubMedId: 8115411
Journal Article: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 47, 1994
Authors: C G McAllister, A R Caggiula, S Knopf, L H Epstein, A L Miller, S M Antelman, K A Perkins
PubMedId: 8300857
Journal Article: Journal of neuroimmunology, vol. 50, 1994
Authors: Anthony R. Caggiula, Leonard H. Epstein, Seymour M. Antelman, Saundra Saylor, Steven Knopf, Kenneth A. Perkins, Richard Stiller
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 111, pp. 499-507, 1993
Authors: K A Perkins, J E Grobe, L H Epstein, A Caggiula, R L Stiller, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 8327544
Journal Article: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 45, 1993
Authors: A R Caggiula, L H Epstein, S M Antelman, S Saylor, S Knopf, K A Perkins, R Stiller
PubMedId: 7870994
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 111, 1993
Authors: L H Epstein, S L Mitchell, A R Caggiula
PubMedId: 8451328
Journal Article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 53, 1993
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Shari L. Mitchell, Anthony R. Caggiula
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 53, pp. 593-597, 1993
Authors: L H Epstein, A R Caggiula, J S Rodefer, L Wisniewski, S L Mitchell
PubMedId: 8506789
Journal Article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 18, 1993
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Anthony R. Caggiula, Joshua S. Rodefer, Lucene Wisneiwski, Shari L. Mitchell
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 18, pp. 179-185, 1993
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, James E. Grobe, Leonard H. Epstein, Anthony Caggiula, Richard L. Stiller, Rolf G. Jacob
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 45, pp. 375-381, 1993
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, James Grobe, Carolyn Fonte, Amy Dimarco
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 46, pp. 509, 1993
Authors: L H Epstein, A R Caggiula, K A Perkins, S L Mitchell, J S Rodefer
PubMedId: 1409934
Journal Article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 52, 1992
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Joan E. Sexton, Rena Solberg-Kassel, Richard L. Stiller, Rolf G. Jacob
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 106, pp. 53-59, 1992
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, James E. Grobe, Leonard H. Epstein, Anthony R. Caggiula, Richard L. Stiller
Journal-article: Journal of Substance Abuse, vol. 4, pp. 131-141, 1992
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, J E Sexton, R Solberg-Kassel, R L Stiller, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 1738793
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 106, 1992
Authors: L H Epstein, J S Rodefer, L Wisniewski, A R Caggiula
PubMedId: 1615055
Journal Article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 51, 1992
Authors: Anthony R. Caggiula, Cathy G. McAllister, Leonard H. Epstein, Seymour M. Antelman, Steven Knopf, Saundra Saylor, Kenneth A. Perkins
Journal-article: Drug Development Research, vol. 26, pp. 473-479, 1992
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Joshua S. Rodefer, Lucene Wisniewski, Anthony R. Caggiula
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 51, pp. 945-950, 1992
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, James E. Grobe, J. Richard Jennings, Leonard H. Epstein, Celeste Elash
Journal-article: Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, vol. 24, pp. 60-66, 1992
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Anthony R. Caggiula, Kenneth A. Perkins, Shari L. Mitchell, Joshua S. Rodefer
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 52, pp. 641-646, 1992
Authors: L Wisniewski, L H Epstein, A R Caggiula
PubMedId: 1529009
Journal Article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 52, 1992
Authors: K A Perkins, J E Grobe, L H Epstein, A R Caggiula, R L Stiller
PubMedId: 1504638
Clinical Trial: Journal of substance abuse, vol. 4, 1992
Authors: Lucene Wisniewski, Leonard H. Epstein, Anthony R. Caggiula
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 52, pp. 21-26, 1992
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Joan E. Sexton, Richard L. Stiller, Rolf G. Jacob
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 40, pp. 203-208, 1991
Authors: L H Epstein, C M Bulik, K A Perkins, A R Caggiula, J Rodefer
PubMedId: 1871188
Comparative Study: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 38, 1991
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, J E Sexton, R L Stiller, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 1805223
Journal Article: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 40, 1991
Authors: A R Caggiula, L H Epstein, S M Antelman, S S Saylor, K A Perkins, S Knopf, R Stiller
PubMedId: 1780345
Journal Article: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 40, 1991
Authors: Bonita L. Marks, Kenneth A. Perkins, Kenneth F. Metz, Leonard H. Epstein, Robert J. Robertson, Frederic L. Goss, Joan E. Sexton
Journal-article: International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 10, pp. 441-449, 1991
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Anthony R. Caggiula, Kenneth A. Perkins, Sandra J. McKenzie, Jeffrey A. Smith
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 39, pp. 15-19, 1991
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R L Stiller, M H Fernstrom, J E Sexton, R G Jacob, R Solberg
PubMedId: 2006236
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 103, 1991
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Cynthia M. Bulik, Kenneth A. Perkins, Anthony R. Caggiula, Joshua Rodefer
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 38, pp. 715-721, 1991
Authors: K A Perkins, J E Sexton, R D Solberg-Kassel, L H Epstein
PubMedId: 1766345
Journal Article: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 23, 1991
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, J. Richard Jennings
Journal-article: Journal of Substance Abuse, vol. 3, pp. 29-38, 1991
Authors: L H Epstein, A R Caggiula, K A Perkins, S J McKenzie, J A Smith
PubMedId: 1924497
Journal Article: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 39, 1991
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R I Stiller, J E Sexton, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 1876120
Journal Article: NIDA research monograph, vol. 105, 1991
Authors: L H Epstein, C M Bulik, K A Perkins, A R Caggiula
PubMedId: 1876070
Journal Article: NIDA research monograph, vol. 105, 1991
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, J R Jennings
PubMedId: 1821273
Journal Article: Journal of substance abuse, vol. 3, 1991
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Richard L. Stiller, Madelyn H. Fernstrom, Joan E. Sexton, Rolf G. Jacob, Rena Solberg
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 103, pp. 103-109, 1991
Authors: Anthony R. Caggiula, Leonard H. Epstein, Seymour M. Antelman, Saundra S. Saylor, Kenneth A. Perkins, Steven Knopf, Richard Stiller
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 40, pp. 53-59, 1991
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Susanne Pastor
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 58, pp. 121-125, 1990
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Richard L. Stiller, Joan E. Sexton, Bonita L. Marks, Rolf G. Jacob
Journal-article: Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, vol. 17, pp. 327-334, 1990
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R L Stiller, J E Sexton, B L Marks, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 2354552
Journal Article: Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology, vol. 17, 1990
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Richard L. Stiller, Joan E. Sexton, Thomas D. Debski, Rolf G. Jacob
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 37, pp. 11-15, 1990
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R L Stiller, J E Sexton, T D Debski, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 2263651
Journal Article: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 37, 1990
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R L Stiller, J E Sexton, M H Fernstrom, R G Jacob, R Solberg
PubMedId: 2375287
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 52, pp. 228-233, 1990
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, J E Sexton, S Pastor
PubMedId: 2136116
Journal Article: Journal of substance abuse, vol. 2, 1990
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Joan E. Sexton, Susanne Pastor
Journal-article: Journal of Substance Abuse, vol. 2, pp. 287-297, 1990
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, S Pastor
PubMedId: 2319045
Journal Article: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 58, 1990
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R L Stiller, M H Fernstrom, J E Sexton, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 2339157
Journal Article: Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, vol. 35, 1990
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Richard L. Stiller, Madelyn H. Fernstrom, Joan E. Sexton, Rolf G. Jacob
Journal-article: Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, vol. 35, pp. 671-676, 1990
Authors: L. H. Epstein, K. A. Perkins, J. R. Jennings, S. Pastor
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 100, pp. 366-371, 1990
Authors: L H Epstein, K A Perkins, J R Jennings, S Pastor
PubMedId: 2315434
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 100, 1990
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Susanne Pastor
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 58, pp. 121-125, 1990
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Richard L. Stiller, Bonita L. Marks, Rolf G. Jacob
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 97, pp. 529-534, 1989
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Neil E. Grunberg, Edward Lichtenstein, Richard I. Evans
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 8, pp. 705-721, 1989
Authors: Anthony R. Caggiula, Leonard H. Epstein, Richard Stiller
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 99, pp. 389-392, 1989
Authors: L H Epstein, A R Caggiula, R Stiller
PubMedId: 2498933
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 97, 1989
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, B L Marks, R L Stiller, R G Jacob
Abstract: The metabolic effects of nicotine have been implicated in the relation between smoking and lower body weight. This study examined whether the nicotine-induced increase in the metabolic rate observed at rest is also present during physical activity. We compared the energy expenditure of 10 male smokers receiving nicotine (15 micrograms per kilogram of body weight) with that of 10 male smokers receiving placebo on two occasions, each including a period of rest and a period of exercise on a modified bicycle ergometer at workloads designed to simulate and standardize light daily activity. All had abstained from cigarette smoking the night before the study. The excess energy expenditure attributable to nicotine was more than twice as great during exercise (difference between groups, 0.51 kJ per kilogram per hour, or 12.1 percent of the metabolic rate at rest; P less than 0.001) than during rest (0.23 kJ per kilogram per hour, or 5.3 percent of the metabolic rate at rest; P less than 0.05). In contrast, the expenditure was not affected by placebo during exercise or rest in the smokers or in a comparison group of 10 non-smokers, indicating that smoking status has no long-term metabolic effect in the absence of short-term nicotine intake. We conclude that the relatively small metabolic effect of nicotine when the subject is at rest is enhanced during light exercise. Our data also suggest that the weight gain that often follows smoking cessation may be influenced not only by nicotine intake but also by the level of physical activity a smoker typically engages in while smoking.
PubMedId: 2927460
Journal-article: The New England journal of medicine, vol. 320, 1989
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Anthony R. Caggiula, Richard Stiller
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 97, pp. 235-237, 1989
Authors: L H Epstein, R R Wing, P Cluss, M H Fernstrom, B Penner, K A Perkins, S Nudelman, B Marks, A Valoski
PubMedId: 2916453
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 49, pp. 331-336, 1989
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Neil E. Grunberg, Edward Lichtenstein, Richard I. Evans
Journal-article: Health Psychology, vol. 8, pp. 705-721, 1989
Authors: L H Epstein, N E Grunberg, E Lichtenstein, R I Evans
PubMedId: 2700344
Journal Article: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 8, 1989
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R L Stiller, B L Marks, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 2498949
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 97, 1989
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, R L Stiller, B L Marks, R G Jacob
PubMedId: 2773833
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 50, pp. 545-550, 1989
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Alice Valoski, Rena R. Wing, Kenneth A. Perkins, Madelyn Fernstrom, Bonita Marks, James McCurley
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 12, pp. 105-118, 1989
Authors: L H Epstein, A Valoski, R R Wing, K A Perkins, M Fernstrom, B Marks, J McCurley
PubMedId: 2764552
Journal Article: Appetite, vol. 12, 1989
Authors: A R Caggiula, L H Epstein, R Stiller
PubMedId: 2594905
Journal Article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 99, 1989
Authors: L H Epstein, K A Perkins
PubMedId: 3294259
Journal Article: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 56, 1988
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Kenneth A. Perkins
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 56, pp. 342-349, 1988
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Kenneth A. Perkins
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 56, pp. 342-349, 1988
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Sheila Nudelman, Rena R. Wing
Journal-article: Behavior Therapy, vol. 18, pp. 147-152, 1987
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Janet Wagner, Sheila Nudelman, Bonita L. Marks
Journal-article: Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, vol. 9, pp. 423-428, 1987
Authors: K A Perkins, L H Epstein, J R Jennings, R Stiller
PubMedId: 3097726
Clinical Trial: Psychopharmacology, vol. 90, 1986
Authors: KennethA. Perkins, LeonardH. Epstein, J.Richard Jennings, Richard Stiller
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 90, 1986
Authors: Kenneth A. Perkins, Leonard H. Epstein, Richard Stiller, J. Richard Jennings, Curt Christiansen, Terry McCarthy
Journal-article: Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, vol. 18, pp. 420-426, 1986
Authors: M H Fernstrom, L H Epstein, D G Spiker, D J Kupfer
PubMedId: 3995117
Journal Article: Biological psychiatry, vol. 20, 1985
Authors: Madelyn H. Fernstrom, Leonard H. Epstein, Duane G. Spiker, David J. Kupfer
Journal-article: Biological Psychiatry, vol. 20, pp. 692-695, 1985
Authors: Deborah J. Ossip-Klein, Leonard H. Epstein, M. Kathleen Winter, Richard Stiller, Peggy Russell, Barb Dickson
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 51, pp. 234-241, 1983
Authors: D J Ossip-Klein, L H Epstein, M K Winter, R Stiller, P Russell, B Dickson
PubMedId: 6841767
Clinical Trial: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 51, 1983
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Barbara E. Dickson, Deborah J. Ossip, Richard Stiller, Peggy O. Russell, Kathy Winter
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 7, pp. 307-310, 1982
Authors: L H Epstein, B E Dickson, D J Ossip, R Stiller, P O Russell, K Winter
PubMedId: 7180627
Journal Article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 7, 1982
Authors: Warren K. Bickel, David P. Jarmolowicz, James MacKillop, Leonard H. Epstein, Katelyn Carr, E. Terry Mueller, Thomas J. Waltz
Book-chapter: APA addiction syndrome handbook, Vol. 2: Recovery, prevention, and other issues., pp. 333-363,
Presented by CUBS © 2022