UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Kenneth E Leonard UB Profile
Psychiatry
Director, Research Institute on Addictions and Professor of Psychiatry
Specialty/Research Focus: Addictions; Psychiatry
Research Institute on Addictions
1021 Main St
Buffalo NY 14203
716-887-2509
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Pamela Schuetze, Rina D. Eiden, Craig R. Colder, Marilyn A. Huestis, Kenneth E. Leonard
PubMedId: 28383108
Journal-article: Child Development, vol. 89, pp. e123-e137, 2017
Authors: Sara J Bartel, Simon B Sherry, Danielle S Molnar, Aislin R Mushquash, Kenneth E Leonard, Gordon L Flett, Sherry H Stewart
Keywords: Binge drinking Heavy episodic drinking Sex differences Social learning theory
Abstract: Approximately one in five adults engage in heavy episodic drinking (HED), a behavior with serious health and social consequences. Environmental, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors contribute to and perpetuate HED. Prior research supports the partner influence hypothesis where partners influence each other's HED. We examined the partner influence hypothesis longitudinally over three years in heterosexual couples in serious romantic relationships, while exploring possible sex differences in the magnitude of partner influence. One-hundred-and-seventy-nine heterosexual couples in serious relationships (38.5% married at baseline) completed a measure of HED at baseline and again three years later. Using actor-partner interdependence modelling, results showed actor effects for both men and women, with HED remaining stable for each partner from baseline to follow-up. Significant partner effects were found for both men and women, who both positively influenced their partners' HED over the three-year follow-up. The partner influence hypothesis was supported. Results indicated partner influences on HED occur over the longer term and apply to partners in varying stages of serious romantic relationships (e.g., cohabiting, engaged, married). Women were found to influence their partners' HED just as much as men influence their partners' HED. Findings suggest HED should be assessed and treated as a couples' issue rather than simply as an individual risky behavior.
PubMedId: 28131933
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 69, 2016
Authors: Sean P Mackinnon, Ivy-Lee L Kehayes, Kenneth E Leonard, Ronald Fraser, Sherry H Stewart
Abstract: Partner-specific perfectionistic concerns (PC) include concern over mistakes, self-criticism, and socially prescribed perfectionism as it pertains to one's partner. The social disconnection model proposes that PC influences well-being indirectly through interpersonal problems. Thus, we hypothesized that social negativity (expressed anger, hostility, and rejection) would mediate the relationship between dyadic PC and subjective well-being. Data from 203 romantic dyads (92.1% heterosexual) were collected using self-report surveys and a four-wave, 4-week longitudinal design. Participants were predominantly female (53.1%), young (M=22.69 years), and Caucasian (82.3%). Data were analyzed using an actor-partner interdependence model with multilevel structural equation modeling. There were significant actor effects at the between-subjects and within-subjects levels, and significant partner effects for the relationship between PC and social negativity at the within-subject level. Social negativity mediated the relationships between PC and both negative affect and life satisfaction. However, positive affect was more weakly related to PC and social negativity. The social disconnection model was supported. PC was positively associated with one's own social negativity and evoked hostile behaviors from one's partner. Hostile, rejecting behaviors reduced the well-being of the actor, but not the partner. Results suggest perfectionism may be best understood within an interpersonal context.
PubMedId: 26808053
Journal-article: Journal of personality, vol. 85, 2016
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Jared Lessard, Craig R Colder, Jennifer Livingston, Meghan Casey, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: A developmental cascade model for adolescent substance use beginning in infancy was examined in a sample of children with alcoholic and nonalcoholic parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression and antisocial behavior in a cascading process of risk via 3 major hypothesized pathways: first, via parental warmth/sensitivity from toddler to kindergarten age predicting higher parental monitoring in middle childhood through early adolescence, serving as a protective pathway for adolescent substance use; second, via child low self-regulation in the preschool years to a continuing externalizing behavior problem pathway leading to underage drinking and higher engagement with substance using peers; and third, via higher social competence from kindergarten age through middle childhood being protective against engagement with delinquent and substance using peers, and leading to lower adolescent substance use. The sample consisted of 227 intact families recruited from the community at 12 months of child age. Results were supportive for the first 2 pathways to substance use in late adolescence. Among proximal, early adolescent risks, engagement with delinquent peers and parent's acceptance of underage drinking were significant predictors of late adolescent alcohol and marijuana use. The results highlight the important protective roles of maternal warmth/sensitivity in early childhood to kindergarten age, parental monitoring in middle childhood, and of child self-regulation in the preschool period as reducing risk for externalizing behavior problems, underage drinking, and engagement with delinquent peers in early adolescence. Specific implications for the creation of developmentally fine-tuned preventive intervention are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMedId: 27584669
Journal-article: Developmental psychology, vol. 52, 2016
Authors: Jaye L Derrick, Rebecca J Houston, Brian M Quigley, Maria Testa, Audrey Kubiak, Ash Levitt, Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Impulsivity is negatively associated with relationship satisfaction, but whether relationship functioning is harmed or helped when both partners are high in impulsivity is unclear. The influence of impulsivity might be exacerbated (the Volatility Hypothesis) or reversed (the Compatibility Hypothesis). Alternatively, discrepancies in impulsivity might be particularly problematic (the Incompatibility Hypothesis). Behavioral and self-report measures of impulsivity were collected from a community sample of couples. Mixed effect polynomial regressions with response surface analysis provide evidence in favor of both the Compatibility Hypothesis and the Incompatibility Hypothesis, but not the Volatility Hypothesis. Mediation analyses suggest results for satisfaction are driven by perceptions of the partner's negative behavior and responsiveness. Implications for the study of both impulsivity and relationship functioning are discussed.
PubMedId: 26949275
Journal-article: Journal of research in personality, vol. 61, 2016
Authors: Cory A Crane, Maria Testa, Robert C Schlauch, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Self-reported marijuana use has been associated with poor relationship functioning and decreased stability over time. The present study examined the behavioral interactions of couples with concordant and discordant patterns of marijuana use during conflict, using individual self-reports and observation by independent coders. Heavy drinking community couples (N = 149) participated in a conflict resolution paradigm. Interactions were recorded and coded by nave coders. Approximately 30% of the sample reported past year marijuana use. Actor-Partner Interdependence Models and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used to evaluate the individual and interactive effects of dyadic marijuana use on maladaptive relationship functioning. A Robust Actor Partner Marijuana Use interaction was detected for a range of behavioral outcomes, assessed by both self-report and direct observation, including relationship satisfaction, anger experience, patterns of demand and withdrawal during conflict, constructive behaviors, and overall relationship quality. Specifically, couples in which both partners used or abstained from marijuana displayed more adaptive relationship functioning across indicators relative to couples in which only 1 partner identified as a marijuana user. This pattern was particularly strong for couples in which the female partner used marijuana and the male partner did not. Couples with discordant, rather than concordant, marijuana use displayed distinct conflict resolution behaviors that were consistent with the long-term negative relationship outcomes that have been observed in previous studies. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMedId: 27454369
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 30, 2016
Authors: Sharon C. Wilsnack, Kenneth J. Sher, Kim Fromme, Kenneth E. Leonard, Laura E. Nagy, Helene R. White
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 77, pp. 541-544, 2016
Authors: Sharon C Wilsnack, Kenneth J Sher, Kim Fromme, Kenneth E Leonard, Laura E Nagy, Helene R White
PubMedId: 27340953
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 77, 2016
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Brian M Quigley
Keywords: alcohol intimate partner violence
Abstract: Research over the past 30years has demonstrated that excessive alcohol use meets all of the epidemiological criteria for causality. While neither a necessary nor a sufficient cause, excessive alcohol use does contribute to the occurrence of partner violence and that contribution is approximately equal to other contributing causes such as gender roles, anger and marital functioning. Current theories of how excessive drinking results in partner violence provide a potentially valuable framework with respect to who should be targeted for interventions with respect to alcohol-related partner violence and what those interventions should address.
PubMedId: 27305859
Journal-article: Drug and alcohol review, vol. 36, 2015
Authors: Ash Levitt, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Research and theory suggest that romantic couple members are motivated to drink to cope with interpersonal distress. Additionally, this behavior and its consequences appear to be differentially associated with insecure attachment styles. However, no research has directly examined drinking to cope that is specific to relationship problems, or with relationship-specific drinking outcomes. Based on alcohol motivation and attachment theories, the current study examines relationship-specific drinking-to-cope processes over the early years of marriage. Specifically, it was hypothesized that drinking to cope with a relationship problem would mediate the associations between insecure attachment styles (i.e., anxious and avoidant) and frequencies of drinking with and apart from one's partner and marital alcohol problems in married couples. Multilevel models were tested via the actor-partner interdependence model using reports of both members of 470 couples over the first nine years of marriage. As expected, relationship-specific drinking-to-cope motives mediated the effects of actor anxious attachment on drinking apart from one's partner and on marital alcohol problems, but, unexpectedly, not on drinking with the partner. No mediated effects were found for attachment avoidance. Results suggest that anxious (but not avoidant) individuals are motivated to use alcohol to cope specifically with relationship problems in certain contexts, which may exacerbate relationship difficulties associated with attachment anxiety. Implications for theory and future research on relationship-motivated drinking are discussed.
PubMedId: 25799439
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 29, 2015
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 26107097
Journal-article: Nature, vol. 522, 2015
Authors: Maria Testa, Kathleen A Parks, Joseph H Hoffman, Cory A Crane, Kenneth E Leonard, Kathleen Shyhalla
PubMedId: 26098025
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 76, 2015
Authors: Jared Lessard, James Henrie, Jennifer A Livingston, Kenneth E Leonard, Craig R Colder, Rina D Eiden
Abstract: Few studies have examined predictors of ever having used electronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes) among older adolescents. This study examined correlates of ever having used e-cigarettes among adolescent children of alcoholic fathers. Participants were 136 adolescents (50.7% male, 89.4% European American) from an ongoing longitudinal case-control study of children of alcoholic fathers. Adolescents reported on their mother's and father's parenting during middle adolescence (MA; M age = 13.8) and completed measures of their own, as well as their peers', substance use during late adolescence (LA; M age = 17.0). Parents completed measures of their own substance use at the MA assessment. More than one third (36.9%) of the participants reported ever using e-cigarettes. Parental monitoring during MA (odds ratio [OR] = 0.85, p < .05), lifetime use of cigarettes (OR = 3.88, p < .01), alcohol use (OR = 7.72, p < .05), marijuana use (OR = 4.07, p < .01), and peer substance use (OR = 1.34, p < .05) during LA were each uniquely associated with ever having used e-cigarettes. Ever having used e-cigarettes also was associated with more frequent current cigarette use ( = .38, p < .05), alcohol use ( = .30, p < .01), and marijuana use ( = .31, p < .05). Results suggest that ever having used e-cigarettes in LA is a risk marker for substance use. Interventions to promote parental monitoring may be effective in curbing use of e-cigarettes and other substances in LA.
PubMedId: 25173773
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 16, 2014
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Jamie J Winters, Jill N Kearns-Bodkin, Gregory G Homish, Audrey J Kubiak
Abstract: Research examining dyadic patterns of intimate partner violence (IPV) often focuses on static conceptions based on whether either the husband or wife has exhibited any violence. This study examined the dyadic patterns of IPV empirically and traced how these groups change over time. Couples (N=634) were assessed with respect to IPV and relationship satisfaction at the time of marriage, and at their first and second anniversaries. Cluster analysis was conducted on Total Aggression, Differential Aggression, and the Aggression Ratio prior to marriage for couples with any violence. This analysis revealed 5 clusters; Very High-Husband to Wife, (High:H>W); Very High-Wife to Husband (High-W>H); Low to Moderate, Husband to Wife (Low:H>W); Low to Moderate, Wife to Husband (Low-W>H); Low to Moderate, Both Aggressive (Low:H=W). The majority (57%) of the aggressive couples were classified in the gender asymmetric groups. Most asymmetric clusters became symmetric over time, but the High:H>W cluster became more asymmetric. By the 2nd anniversary, all clusters were characterized by higher injuries experienced by wives than by husbands. These results demonstrate that a considerable amount of IPV that is typically classified as "bidirectional" is gender asymmetric and that these asymmetric patterns tend to converge into more symmetric patterns over time.
PubMedId: 25506502
Journal-article: Psychology of violence, vol. 4, 2014
Authors: Jaye L Derrick, Maria Testa, Kenneth E Leonard
Keywords: daily diary domestic violence dyadic data analysis hierarchical linear modeling intimate partner aggression intimate partner violence multilevel modeling
Abstract: Agreement within couples regarding the occurrence of aggression is surprisingly low. Survey research often collapses across partners' reports to create a pooled estimate of aggression in the relationship. This method ignores possible differences in partners' perceptions of the event, potentially weakening researchers' ability to detect consequences of aggression. The current study examines both partners' reports of verbal aggression to determine whether aggression reported by only one partner influences both partners' short-term outcomes. We used a 56-day daily diary to examine the effect of verbal aggression on short-term negative outcomes. We examined whether aggression reported by either partner is sufficient to predict consequences for both partners, or if an individual must report aggression to experience consequences. Victims' reports of receiving verbal aggression were a better predictor of next day victim consequences than perpetrators' reports. Perpetrators' reports of perpetrating verbal aggression were a better predictor of next day perpetrator consequences than victims' reports. Days when partners agreed that aggression had occurred generally predicted the worst outcomes. People's own reports of verbal aggression are the best predictor of short-term consequences. Pooling partner reports of aggression may make it more difficult to understand the consequences of intimate partner aggression.
PubMedId: 25346861
Journal-article: Psychology of violence, vol. 4, 2014
Authors: Philip H Smith, Gregory G Homish, R Lorraine Collins, Gary A Giovino, Helene R White, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Research on the association between marijuana use and intimate partner violence (IPV) has generated inconsistent findings, and has been primarily based on cross-sectional data. We examined whether husbands' and wives' marijuana use predicted both husbands' and wives' IPV perpetration over the first 9 years of marriage (Wave 1, n = 634 couples). We also examined moderation by antisocial behavior, the spouse's marijuana use, and whether IPV was reported during the year before marriage. These predictive associations were calculated using a time-lagged multivariate generalized multilevel model, simultaneously estimating predictors of husband and wife IPV. In fully adjusted models, we found that more frequent marijuana use by husbands and wives predicted less frequent IPV perpetration by husbands. Husbands' marijuana use also predicted less frequent IPV perpetration by wives. Moderation analyses demonstrated that couples in which both spouses used marijuana frequently reported the least frequent IPV perpetration. There was a significant positive association between wives' marijuana use and wives' IPV perpetration, but only among wives who had already reported IPV perpetration during the year before marriage. These findings suggest there may be an overall inverse association between marijuana use and IPV perpetration in newly married couples, although use may be associated with greater risk of perpetration among women with a history of IPV perpetration.
PubMedId: 25134048
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, 2014
Authors: Jaye L. Derrick, Kenneth E. Leonard
Book: Oxford Handbooks Online, 2014
Authors: Lorig K Kachadourian, Brian M Quigley, Kenneth E Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 75, pp. 744-752, 2014
Authors: Lorig K Kachadourian, Brian M Quigley, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 25208191
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 75, 2014
Authors: Maria Testa, Cory A. Crane, Brian M. Quigley, Ash Levitt, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 75, pp. 249-258, 2014
Authors: Maria Testa, Cory A Crane, Brian M Quigley, Ash Levitt, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 24650819
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 75, 2014
Authors: Rebecca J. Houston, Jaye L. Derrick, Kenneth E. Leonard, Maria Testa, Brian M. Quigley, Audrey Kubiak
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 39, pp. 345-349, 2014
Authors: Rebecca J Houston, Jaye L Derrick, Kenneth E Leonard, Maria Testa, Brian M Quigley, Audrey Kubiak
PubMedId: 24459697
Journal Article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 39, 2014
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Philip H Smith, Gregory G Homish
Abstract: This study examined concordant and discrepant alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use among couples to determine whether they predicted marital separation or divorce over 9 years. The study recruited 634 couples as they applied for their marriage licenses; we assessed them at that time and reassessed them with mailed questionnaires at their first, second, fourth, seventh, and ninth wedding anniversaries. Approximately 60% of the men and women were European American, and approximately 33% were African American. The frequency of drinking to intoxication and binge drinking (more than 5 drinks in an occasion) was assessed, as was the use of cigarettes and marijuana. At each assessment, each member of the couple was asked about the occurrence of marital separations and divorce. Bivariate analyses indicated that tobacco and marijuana use, whether discrepant or concordant, were associated with marital disruptions. However, discrepant heavy drinking was associated with disruptions, but concordant heavy drinking was not. Concordant and discordant marijuana use were not associated with divorce when analyses controlled for alcohol and tobacco use. Concordant and discordant tobacco use was not associated with divorce when analyses controlled for sociodemographic and personality factors. However, discrepant alcohol use was related to divorce after controlling for the other substances in 1 analysis and after controlling for the sociodemographic factors in a separate analysis. Tobacco and marijuana use were related to divorce through their associations with other variables. However, results suggest that discrepant alcohol use may lead to marital disruptions and should be addressed with couples seeking marital treatment.
PubMedId: 24128287
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, 2013
Authors: Cory A Crane, Maria Testa, Jaye L Derrick, Kenneth E Leonard
Keywords: actor-partner interdependence anger conflict heavy episodic drinking self-control
Abstract: An emerging literature suggests that temporary deficits in the ability to inhibit impulsive urges may be proximally associated with intimate partner aggression. The current study examined the experience of alcohol use and the depletion of self-control in the prediction of relationship functioning. Daily diary data collected from 118 heterosexual couples were analyzed using parallel multi-level Actor-Partner Interdependence Models to assess the effects of heavy episodic drinking and depletion of self-control across partners on outcomes of participant-reported daily arguing with and anger toward an intimate partner. Heavy episodic drinking among actors predicted greater arguing but failed to interact with either actor or partner depletion. We also found that greater arguing was reported on days of high congruent actor and partner depletion. Both actor and partner depletion, as well as their interaction, predicted greater partner-specific anger. The current results highlight the importance of independently assessing partner effects (i.e., depletion of self-control), which interact dynamically with disinhibiting actor effects, in the prediction of daily adverse relationship functioning. Results offer further support for the development of prospective individualized and couples-based interventions for partner conflict.
PubMedId: 24700558
Journal-article: Aggressive behavior, vol. 40, 2013
Authors: Ash Levitt, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Previous research has suggested that individuals in romantic relationships hold beliefs about the effects of relationship-drinking contexts (e.g., drinking with one's partner) on later relationship functioning, as well as the effects of relationship functioning on later relationship-drinking contexts, and that these reciprocal effects may be stronger among women compared with men. However, little research has directly examined relationship-specific alcohol expectancies, and no studies have tested the reciprocal associations between these expectancies and the extent of drinking in specific relationship contexts. The current study examined these reciprocal effects by testing time-lagged multilevel models using data from a community sample of 470 married couples during the first 9 years of marriage. As expected, results showed reciprocal effects between intimacy and social expectancies, respectively, and the extent of drinking-with-partner when both partners were drinking, which appeared to be adaptive mechanisms for relationships. Also as expected, some of these effects differed or were stronger for wives compared with husbands. Unexpectedly, reciprocal effects were also found between power expectancies and the extent of drinking apart from one's partner, which appeared to be maladaptive mechanisms for relationships. The current study supports and extends previous research on alcohol use in romantic relationships by showing how relationship-specific alcohol expectancies influence and are influenced from relationship-drinking contexts, and which processes might be adaptive versus maladaptive for romantic relationships. Implications for future research and theory are discussed.
PubMedId: 23276314
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 27, 2013
Authors: Jaye L Derrick, Kenneth E Leonard, Gregory G Homish
Abstract: Support for quitting is associated with smoking cessation, but few studies have examined the influence of more general social support on smoking outcomes. The current research examines perceptions of the partner's willingness and ability to provide general social support (i.e., perceived partner responsiveness) as a longitudinal predictor of smoking trajectories. Data are from a sample of newlywed couples assessed at six timepoints over 9 years. The current analyses focus on both partners in 333 "ever-smoker" couples. Participants completed measures of partner responsiveness, smoking, and demographics through the mail at each timepoint. Both husbands and wives who initially reported greater partner responsiveness showed a decrease over the following 9 years in the likelihood of being a smoker and in cigarette quantity. This decrease was not apparent for husbands and wives who initially reported lower partner responsiveness. These effects were mediated by several time-varying characteristics. Previous research has shown that support for quitting is an important predictor of smoking cessation. The current research demonstrates that more general perceived social support, unrelated to smoking behavior, also predicts decreases in smoking over time in both men and women. In fact, reports of partner responsiveness at baseline predicted smoking over 9 years, demonstrating the potency of this particular relationship perception for smoking outcomes.
PubMedId: 23420901
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 15, 2013
Authors: Julie A Schumacher, Scott F Coffey, Kenneth E Leonard, Judith R O'Jile, Noah C Landy
Abstract: This study builds on research identifying deficits in behavioral self-regulation as risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV). It also builds on alcohol administration research identifying these deficits as moderators of the association between acute alcohol consumption and aggression in laboratory paradigms. Participants analyzed were 97 men seeking residential treatment for alcohol dependence who were involved in a current or recent heterosexual relationship of at least 1 year. Participants completed a self-report measure of impulsivity, neuropsychological tests of executive function, and computerized delay discounting and behavioral inhibition tasks. With the exception of the self-report measure of impulsivity, performance on measures of behavioral self-regulation was not associated with the occurrence or frequency of past year IPV in this sample. Similarly, self-reported impulsivity moderated the association between daily drinking and IPV in multivariate models controlling for daily drug use, but deficits in performance on other measures did not. Performance on a tower task moderated the association between daily drinking and the occurrence of IPV, but contrary to hypotheses, better task performance was associated with greater likelihood of IPV on drinking days. These results suggest that self-perceived impulsivity is a better predictor of IPV in alcohol treatment seeking men than deficits in performance on behavioral measures of delay discounting, behavioral inhibition, and executive function.
PubMedId: 23379612
Journal-article: Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology, vol. 21, 2013
Authors: Brian M. Quigley, Kenneth E. Leonard
Book-chapter: Principles of Addiction, pp. 617-625, 2013
Authors: Ash Levitt, Kenneth E. Leonard
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2013
Authors: Philip H. Smith, Gregory G. Homish, Kenneth E. Leonard, R. Lorraine Collins
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2013
Authors: Philip H Smith, Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, R Lorraine Collins
Keywords: Aggression Cannabis Marijuana NESARC THC Withdrawal
Abstract: Previous laboratory-based research suggests that withdrawal from marijuana may cause increased aggression. It is unclear whether this finding extends beyond the laboratory setting to the general population of marijuana users. The purpose of this study was to test a cross-sectional association between marijuana withdrawal symptoms and aggression among a representative sample of U.S. adult marijuana users, and to test whether this association was moderated by previous history of aggression. Data were analyzed from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Wave Two data (2004-2005) were used for all variables except for history of aggression, which was assessed during the Wave One interview (2001-2002). Two outcomes were examined: self-report general aggression and relationship aggression. Odds ratios for aggression based on withdrawal symptoms and the interaction between withdrawal symptoms and history of aggression were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for covariates and accounting for the complex survey design. Among marijuana users with a history of aggression, marijuana withdrawal was associated with approximately 60% higher odds of past year relationship aggression (p<0.05). There was no association between withdrawal symptoms and relationship aggression among those without a history of aggression, and no association with general aggression regardless of history of aggression. The findings from this study support the notion that laboratory-based increases in aggression due to marijuana withdrawal extend to the general population of marijuana users who have a previous history of aggression.
PubMedId: 23380439
Journal-article: Drug and alcohol dependence, vol. 132, 2012
Authors: Cathy Lau-Barraco, Abby L Braitman, Kenneth E Leonard, Miguel Padilla
Abstract: The process by which peers or the social network influence individual alcohol use, particularly among adults, remains a necessary area of research. The purpose of the present study was to examine the longitudinal influence of "drinking buddies" on alcohol outcomes (i.e., alcohol use, heavy drinking, and alcohol-related problems) as mediated by alcohol expectancies of social facilitation. Participants were 1347 (men = 660, women = 687) newly married individuals recruited from the community. They were assessed at the time of marriage and through the fourth wedding anniversary. Longitudinal mediation across time was evaluated using latent growth modeling. Overall, the prospective association between the number of drinking buddies in the social network and all three alcohol outcomes was mediated by alcohol expectancies. In testing group invariance across gender, findings suggest that social-facilitation expectancies may be more relevant to men than women in predicting typical alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Given that the social network may impact alcohol use at least in part through social expectancies, tailoring alcohol interventions to modify these specific beliefs may be particularly beneficial. In addition, strategies that target drinkers' social networks or their drinking buddies specifically may be useful.
PubMedId: 22732054
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 26, 2012
Authors: Philip H Smith, Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Jack R Cornelius
Abstract: Marital dissolution is associated with increased risk of problematic drinking. However, marriage to a problem drinker also increases this risk, and ending this type of relationship may actually decrease risk of problematic drinking. This study tested whether women ending their marriage to a problem drinker exhibited improvements in drinking. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a two-wave nationally representative survey of the US adult population. In-person interviews conducted in US households. Females married or living as if married at wave 1 at least 18 years of age. Socio-demographics, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, alcohol use disorders, problem drinking, partner problem drinking and relationship dissolution. Ending marriage to a non-problem drinker predicted increased frequency of drinking [risk ratio (RR)=1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.43, 1.67], heavier drinking (RR=1.30; 95% CI=1.71, 1.45), more problematic drinking (RR=2.45; 95% CI=2.17, 2.77) and a greater likelihood of use disorder diagnosis [odds ratio (OR)=2.2; 95% CI=1.67, 2.91]. Ending a relationship with a problem drinker predicted less frequent drinking (RR=0.94; 95% CI=0.90, 0.98), less heavy drinking (RR=0.84; 95% CI=0.78, 0.90) and fewer alcohol-related problems (RR=0.77; 95% CI=0.62, 0.95). Ending a marriage with a husband who drinks problematically may decrease risk of alcohol-related problems among women, substantiating the need for alcohol treatments to address a problem drinking partner.
PubMedId: 22321045
Journal-article: Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 107, 2012
Authors: Maria Testa, Audrey Kubiak, Brian M. Quigley, Rebecca J. Houston, Jaye L. Derrick, Ash Levitt, Gregory G. Homish, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 73, pp. 268-276, 2012
Authors: Maria Testa, Audrey Kubiak, Brian M Quigley, Rebecca J Houston, Jaye L Derrick, Ash Levitt, Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 22333334
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 73, 2012
Authors: Lorig K Kachadourian, Gregory G Homish, Brian M Quigley, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: The direct and interactive effects of alcohol expectancies for aggression, dispositional hostility, and heavy alcohol consumption on alcohol-related physical aggression were examined across the first four years of marriage in a sample of 634 newlywed couples. For husbands, alcohol aggression expectancies predicted increases in alcohol-related aggression; across husbands and wives, however, aggression expectancies were not found to interact with hostility or alcohol consumption to predict physical aggression. Consistent with previous research, hostility and alcohol consumption interacted with each other to predict alcohol-related aggression. Specifically, for both husbands and wives high in dispositional hostility, heavy alcohol consumption was positively associated with the occurrence of alcohol-related aggression; for those low in dispositional hostility, however, there was no association between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related aggression. Findings are contrasted with previous longitudinal research on alcohol aggression expectancies and physical aggression in married couples. The article discusses the extent to which findings may vary depending on whether expectancies are assessed in relation to alcohol's effect on one's own behavior versus alcohol's effect on others' behavior.
PubMedId: 22004128
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 26, 2011
Authors: Philip H Smith, Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Jack R Cornelius
Abstract: The association between substance use and intimate partner violence (IPV) is robust. It is less clear how the use of specific substances relates to relationship violence. This study examined IPV perpetration and victimization related to the following specific substance use disorders: alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, and opioid. The poly substance use of alcohol and cocaine, as well as alcohol and marijuana, were also examined. Data were analyzed from wave two of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004-2005). Associations between substance use disorders and IPV were tested using logistic regression models while controlling for important covariates and accounting for the complex survey design. Alcohol use disorders and cocaine use disorders were most strongly associated with IPV perpetration, while cannabis use disorders and opioid use disorders were most strongly associated with IPV victimization. A diagnosis of both an alcohol use disorder and cannabis use disorder decreased the likelihood of IPV perpetration compared to each individual substance use disorder. A diagnosis of both an alcohol use disorder and cocaine use disorder increased likelihood of reporting IPV perpetration compared with alcohol use disorders alone but decreased likelihood of perpetration compared with a cocaine use disorder diagnosis alone. Overall, substance use disorders were consistently related to intimate partner violence after controlling for important covariates. These results provide further evidence for the important link between substance use disorders and IPV and add to our knowledge of which specific substances may be related to relationship violence.
PubMedId: 21823768
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 26, 2011
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard, Lynn T Kozlowski
Abstract: Cigarette smoking during pregnancy is a significant public health issue that has profound effects on maternal and fetal health. Although many women stop smoking upon pregnancy recognition, a large number continue. Given the higher burden of smoking among low-income women, the focus of this study is to examine the impact of pre-conception social-environmental influences on smoking cessation during the first trimester of pregnancy. Pregnant women who presented for prenatal were asked to complete a screening form at their first prenatal appointment. Women who agreed to participate were scheduled for a total of four interviews; a prenatal interview at the end of each trimester and a postnatal interview at 2 months of infant age. The sample for the current report consisted of pregnant women (first trimester) with a partner (N=316). After controlling for pre-conception heaviness of smoking, a number of social-environmental factors were associated with smoking during the first trimester. Women were more likely to smoke during the first trimester if their partner was a smoker; however, the presence of other household smokers was not associated with increased risk for smoking. Additionally, women with a greater proportion of friends (but not relatives) who smoked and more frequent exposure to environmental tobacco were more likely to smoke. This work found differential impacts of the social network on smoking suggesting that understanding relationship type, not simply number of smokers, may be important for smoking cessation efforts. Understanding differences in social network influences on smoking can help to inform interventions.
PubMedId: 21945011
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 37, 2011
Authors: Steven L Dubovsky, Kenneth Leonard, Kim Griswold, Elsa Daurignac, Burlleen Hewitt, Chester Fox, Deborah Seymour, Amelia N Dubovsky, Frank DeGruy
Abstract: To examine the prevalence and treatment of typical and subsyndromal bipolar disorder (BD) in depressed primary care patients. Patients with a diagnosis of a mood disorder being treated with antidepressants in 2 academic family practice clinics underwent a structured diagnostic interview (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory) for manic and hypomanic symptoms. Of 58 patients evaluated, 19% met full criteria for bipolar I disorder and 8.6% for bipolar II disorder; 31% had subsyndromal BD (ie, persistent elation or irritability accompanied by additional symptoms of hypomania but not enough symptoms to meet full criteria for bipolar I or II disorder). Only 5 patients with BD were receiving mood stabilizers, which had not been instituted in any patient by the primary care physician. The high prevalence of patients meeting full criteria for BD and the low rate of identification of BD in primary care patients are consistent with estimates using self-administered questionnaires, but the interview revealed a substantial additional population that could be considered to have subsyndromal BD. Because subsyndromal forms of BD are associated with significant impairment and comorbidity as well as progression to frank BD, recognition of both full and subthreshold BD in primary care practice should be improved.
PubMedId: 21904095
Journal-article: Postgraduate medicine, vol. 123, 2011
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Danielle S Molnar, Kenneth E Leonard, Craig R Colder, Gregory G Homish, Nicole Maiorana, Pamela Schuetze, Gerard J Connors
Abstract: This study examined sources of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) during pregnancy and misclassification of women as having no SHS exposure if partner smoking was used as the only measure of SHS exposure. We also examined changes in SHS exposure across the three trimesters of pregnancy. The sample consisted of 245 pregnant women who were in a serious relationship with a partner and 106 for examination of change over time. Women's smoking status was determined by a combination of self-reports and oral fluid assays. Women's reports of partner smoking, smoking by other social network members, and frequency of exposure to SHS were obtained. The most common source of SHS exposure during pregnancy was the partner (n = 245). However, reliance on the partner smoking measure alone would have misclassified a substantial number of women as having no SHS exposure during pregnancy. The importance of exposure from the general social network was also evident in the finding that among nonsmoking women with nonsmoking partners, 50% reported some level of SHS exposure in the preceding week. Contrary to expectations, there were no changes in SHS exposure across the three trimesters of pregnancy (n = 106). Results highlight the need for treatment plans to target sources of exposure from other members of women's social networks in addition to partners. It may be unrealistic to expect women's cessation efforts to be successful in the face of consistent and continued SHS exposure through pregnancy.
PubMedId: 21460384
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 13, 2011
Authors: Julie A Schumacher, Scott F Coffey, Paul R Stasiewicz, Christopher M Murphy, Kenneth E Leonard, William Fals-Stewart
Abstract: The current studies were a manual development study and a small pilot study of a 90-minute motivational enhancement style intervention to address IPV in alcohol treatment-seeking men. Analyses of feedback provided during manual development suggest participants: (a) liked the intervention, (b) reported behavior change intentions, and (c) found the feedback compelling. Findings from the pilot study suggest the intervention may be superior to referral only in increasing short-term help-seeking and lead to marginally significant enhancements in motivation and self-reported intimacy. Help-seeking and motivation findings were associated with medium-large to large effect sizes. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, both groups showed improvements in self-reported alcohol outcomes, anger, and verbal and physical aggression. These findings support further research on this intervention.
PubMedId: 21547014
Journal-article: Journal of aggression, maltreatment & trauma, vol. 20, 2011
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Kenneth E. Leonard, Craig R. Colder, Gregory G. Homish, Pamela Schuetze, Teresa R. Gray, Marilyn A. Huestis
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 72, pp. 926-932, 2011
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard, Craig R Colder, Gregory G Homish, Pamela Schuetze, Teresa R Gray, Marilyn A Huestis
PubMedId: 22051206
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 72, 2011
Authors: Maria Testa, Joseph H Hoffman, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Cross-sectional and longitudinal predictors of mutual and nonmutual intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration were identified in a sample of female college freshmen (N = 499). Using female reports, couples were classified as to whether the relationship included no IPV, female-only IPV, or mutual IPV (male-only IPV was too rare to analyze). Mutual IPV was more common than asymmetrical IPV, and women in mutually violent relationships perpetrated more frequent acts of physical aggression than those in female-only violent relationships. In cross-sectional analyses of IPV in the first semester of college, only partner antisocial behavior and psychological aggression distinguished female-only IPV from no IPV; witnessing mother-to-father aggression, higher psychological aggression, more frequent partner marijuana use, partner antisocial behavior, and, surprisingly, higher relationship satisfaction, discriminated mutual IPV from no IPV. Contrary to hypothesis, first semester (T1) IPV did not predict having a new partner in the second semester (T2); however, women who reported more frequent heavy episodic drinking and lower relationship satisfaction at T1 were more likely to be in a different relationship at T2. Prospective prediction of T2 IPV category failed to support the hypothesis that female-only IPV would escalate to mutual IPV. The majority of couples with female-only IPV reported no IPV at T2. After accounting for T1 IPV, the only significant predictor of T2 IPV category was T1 psychological aggression, suggesting that this may be an appropriate target for IPV prevention efforts among college dating couples.
PubMedId: 21462201
Journal-article: Aggressive behavior, vol. 37, 2010
Authors: Teresa R Gray, Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard, Gerard J Connors, Shannon Shisler, Marilyn A Huestis
Abstract: Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit drug among pregnant women, but data describing the effects of prenatal cannabis exposure and concurrent nicotine and cannabis exposures on neonatal growth are inconsistent. Testing of meconium, the first neonatal feces, offers objective evidence of prenatal cannabis exposure, but the relative ability of meconium testing and maternal self-report to identify affected neonates remains unclear. Eighty-six pregnant women provided detailed self-reports of daily cannabis and tobacco consumption throughout pregnancy. Cannabinoids and tobacco biomarkers were identified in oral fluid samples collected each trimester and quantified in meconium at birth. Cannabis-using women were significantly more likely to also consume tobacco, and smoked similar numbers of cigarettes as non-cannabis-using tobacco smokers. As pregnancy progressed, fewer women smoked cannabis and those who continued to use cannabis reported smoking a smaller number of cannabis joints, but positive maternal oral fluid tests cast doubt on the veracity of some maternal self-reports. More neonates were identified as cannabis exposed by maternal self-report than meconium analysis, because many women quit cannabis use after the first or second trimester; meconium was more likely to be positive if cannabis use continued into the third trimester. Cannabis exposure was associated with decreased birth weight, reduced length, and smaller head circumference, even after data were controlled for tobacco coexposure. Prenatal cannabis exposure was associated with fetal growth reduction. Meconium testing primarily identifies prenatal cannabis exposure occurring in the third trimester of gestation.
PubMedId: 20628142
Journal-article: Clinical chemistry, vol. 56, 2010
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Jack R Cornelius
Abstract: The objective of the current report was to examine individual, partner and relationship factors (e.g. relationship satisfaction) associated with the non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) in a community sample of married adults. The current report used two waves of data from an ongoing study of couples who were recruited at the time they applied for their marriage license and are now in the 10th year of follow-up. Logistic regression models examined the relation between individual, partner and relationship factors and NMUPD. This report is based on 273 couples. Measurements Participants completed questionnaires that assessed prescription drug use, alcohol use, other substance use, depression, marital satisfaction and socio-demographic factors. Among wives, there was evidence that a partner's prescription drug use and relationship factors were associated with increased risk for NMUPD. There was some evidence suggesting that it was the increased access or availability, and not the partner's use per se, that was related to the NMUPD. These results persisted after controlling for other illicit drug use, heavy drinking, depressive symptomatology and socio-demographic factors. Among men, neither partner use nor relationship factors were associated with NMUPD after considering the impact of individual-level risk factors. Prevention and intervention efforts directed at reducing the risk for NMUPD should consider the influence of partner and relationship factors in addition to individual-level risk factors.
PubMedId: 20528812
Journal-article: Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 105, 2010
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Jamie M Ostrov, Craig R Colder, Kenneth E Leonard, Ellen P Edwards, Toni Orrange-Torchia
Abstract: This study examined the association between parents' alcoholism and peer bullying and victimization in middle childhood in 162 community-recruited families (80 girls and 82 boys) with and without alcohol problems. Toddler-mother attachment was assessed at 18 months of child age, and child reports of peer bullying and victimization were obtained in 4th grade. There was a direct association between fathers' alcohol symptoms and bullying of peers, as well as indirect association via toddler-mother attachment security. Multiple group models indicated that the direct association between parents' alcohol symptoms and bullying was significant for boys but not girls. The association between maternal alcohol symptoms and bullying was significant for secure but not insecure boys or secure/insecure girls. The association between fathers' alcohol symptoms and bullying was significant for insecure boys but not secure boys or secure/insecure girls.
PubMedId: 20419575
Journal-article: Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology : the official journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53, vol. 39, 2010
Authors: Teresa R Gray, Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard, Gerard Connors, Shannon Shisler, Marilyn A Huestis
Abstract: Many women continue tobacco use during pregnancy despite known adverse consequences on neonatal growth and development. Testing meconium, the first neonatal feces, for tobacco biomarkers offers objective evidence of prenatal tobacco exposure. However, relationships between the amount, frequency, and timing of cigarette smoking during gestation and tobacco biomarker meconium concentrations and neonatal outcomes are unclear. Eighty-seven pregnant women provided detailed self-reports of daily tobacco consumption throughout pregnancy. Nicotine, cotinine, and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine were quantified in neonatal meconium by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Among nonsmokers, all meconium specimens were negative, whereas nearly all meconium specimens were positive if the mother self-reported tobacco use into the third trimester. Tobacco biomarker concentrations were significantly albeit weakly correlated with mean cigarettes per day in the third trimester. Reduced birth weight, gestational age, or head circumference were observed if meconium contained one or more tobacco biomarkers, but deficits did not correlate with biomarker concentrations. While previously thought to reflect second and third trimester drug exposure, meconium appears to reliably identify only third trimester drug use. While a 10 ng/g nicotine, cotinine, or trans-3'-hydroxycotinine cutoff in meconium was previously proposed to differentiate tobacco-exposed from nonexposed or passively exposed neonates, improved maternal self-reporting techniques in this cohort suggest that a lower cutoff, equivalent to the analytic limits of quantification, is more appropriate.
PubMedId: 20427459
Journal-article: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 12, 2010
Authors: Jaye L. Derrick, Kenneth E. Leonard, Brian M. Quigley, Rebecca J. Houston, Maria Testa, Audrey Kubiak
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 71, pp. 761-768, 2010
Authors: Jaye L Derrick, Kenneth E Leonard, Brian M Quigley, Rebecca J Houston, Maria Testa, Audrey Kubiak
PubMedId: 20731983
Comparative Study: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 71, 2010
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Ellen P Edwards, Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Analyzing data that arises from correlated observations such as husband-wife pairs, siblings, or repeated assessments of the same individuals over time requires more specialized analytic tools. Additionally, outcomes that are not normally distributed such as count data, (e.g., number of symptoms or number of problems endorsed) also require specialized analytic tools. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are a very flexible tool for dealing with correlated data (such as data derived from related individuals such as families). The objective of this report was to compare traditional ordinary least squares regression (OLS) to a GEE approach for analyzing family data. Using data from an ongoing five-wave longitudinal study of newlywed couples, we examined a subset of 173 families with children between the ages of 4 and 11 at two data collection points. The relation between parental risk factors (e.g., heavy drinking, aggression, marital quality) and child internalizing symptoms was examined within the context of two regression-based models: traditional OLS regression and a GEE approach. Overall, the GEE approach allowed a more complete use of the available data, provided more robust findings, and produced more reliable parameter estimates. GEE models are a flexible regression-based approach for dealing with related data that arises from correlated data such as family data. Further, given the availability of the models in common statistical programs, family researchers should consider these models for their work.
PubMedId: 20163918
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 35, 2009
Authors: Brent Finger, Lorig K Kachadourian, Danielle S Molnar, Rina D Eiden, Ellen P Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study utilized a longitudinal design to examine relations between paternal alcoholism, paternal psychopathology, marital aggression and fathers' harsh parenting behavior in a sample of children with alcoholic (n = 89) and non-alcoholic (n = 94) fathers. Structural Equation Modeling revealed that paternal alcoholism, depression, and antisocial behavior at 12 months of child age each predicted higher levels of marital aggression at 36 months. Moreover, after controlling for prior parenting, marital aggression was predictive of harsher parenting at kindergarten. Alcoholism and psychopathology were not directly predictive of harsh parenting with marital aggression included in the model, thus indicating that marital aggression is mediating the relation between paternal risk factors and parenting outcome. Results of this study suggest that one pathway linking fathers' alcohol diagnosis to harsh parenting is via marital aggression.
PubMedId: 20153586
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 35, 2009
Authors: Kim S Griswold, Gregory G Homish, Patricia A Pastore, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Persons with serious mental illnesses suffer excess medical morbidity compared to the general population. This RCT aimed to determine whether navigators are effective in helping patients connect to primary care after psychiatric crisis. Adults presenting for emergency care were randomly assigned to a navigator versus usual care. Navigators facilitated access to primary care. Outcomes were connection rates to medical care and the impact of health insurance, hospitalization and mental health care on primary care attendance. After 1 year, the intervention group was statistically more likely to access care, versus controls (62.4 vs. 37.6%, P < .001). Navigators were effective in helping patients connect to primary care after a psychiatric crisis. Improved access to primary care is important given the complex chronic health problems of this vulnerable cohort.
PubMedId: 20204511
Journal-article: Community mental health journal, vol. 46, 2009
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Lynn T Kozlowski, Jack R Cornelius
Abstract: The objective of this work was to examine the relation between patterns of substance use among newly married couples and marital satisfaction over time. In particular, this work examined if differences between husbands' and wives' heavy alcohol use and cigarette smoking, rather than simply use per se, predicted decreases in marital satisfaction over the first 7 years of marriage. Married couples (n = 634 couples) were assessed on a variety of substance use and relationship variables at the time of marriage and again at the first, second, fourth and seventh years of marriage. After controlling for key socio-demographic variables, discrepancies in husband and wife cigarette smoking and heavy alcohol use were related to significant reductions in marital satisfaction. Importantly, couples who were discrepant on both substances experienced the greatest declines in marital satisfaction over time. Patterns of substance use among newly married couples are important predictors of changes in marital functioning over time. It was not simply the heavy alcohol use or cigarette smoking that predicted dissatisfaction but, rather, differences between husbands' and wives' substance use that impacted the relationship.
PubMedId: 19563563
Journal-article: Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 104, 2009
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Craig Colder, Ellen P Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study tested a conceptual model predicting children's social competence in a sample of children with alcoholic and non-alcoholic parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression, and antisocial behavior at 12-18 months of child age in predicting parental warmth/sensitivity at 2 years of child age. Parental warmth/sensitivity at 2 years was hypothesized to predict children's self-regulation and externalizing behavior problems at 3 years. Parenting, self-regulation, and behavior problems were expected to predict social competence in kindergarten. Structural equations modeling was supportive of this model. Fathers' alcohol diagnosis was associated with lower warmth/sensitivity. Lower maternal warmth/sensitivity at 2 years was predictive of lower child self-regulation at 3 years. Parenting, self-regulation, and externalizing behavior problems were predictive of social competence in kindergarten, although associations varied by reporter (parents or teacher). There was a direct association between fathers' alcohol diagnosis and father reports of social competence, and between fathers' depression and teacher reports of social competence. The study elucidates developmental processes in predicting social competence and the role of fathers' alcoholism and associated risk factors in this process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMedId: 19290688
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 23, 2009
Authors: Ellen P Edwards, Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study examined short-term attachment stability and sought to identify predictors of stability and change within a sample characterized by fathers' alcoholism. Results suggest moderate stability of attachment classifications (60% for mothers, 53% for fathers) from 12 to 18 months. Higher paternal and maternal alcohol symptoms, maternal depression, and maternal antisocial behavior were found in families with stable insecure mother-infant attachment compared to those who were stable secure. Mother-infant stable insecurity was associated with higher levels of maternal negative affect expression during play. Father-infant stable insecurity was associated with lower levels of paternal positive affect expression and decreased sensitivity during play. Stable insecure children also had higher levels of negative affect during parent-infant interactions and higher negative emotionality during other episodes compared to stable secure children. Results indicate that infants who were insecure at both time points had the highest constellation of family risk characteristics.
PubMedId: 19436769
Journal-article: Infant mental health journal, vol. 25, 2009
Authors: Ellen Peterson Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard, Rina DAS Eiden
Abstract: This study examined the association between paternal alcoholism and 12-month infant temperament and 18-month behavior problems. The role of associated parental psychopathology and maternal drinking in exacerbating risk for maladaptive behavioral outcomes was also examined. Participants were 213 families (102 control families, 94 paternal alcoholic families, and 17 families with alcoholic fathers and heavy drinking mothers) who were assessed when their child was 12 months old and reassessed again when their child was 18 months old. Infants of alcoholics displayed marginally more stubborn/persistent temperaments at 12 months of age, but significantly more internalizing problems at 18 months. Analyses suggested that internalizing problems in the infants of alcoholics could be attributed to the paternal depression concomitant with paternal alcoholism. In addition, an interaction was observed, indicating that paternal alcohol problems predicted 18-month externalizing problems among families with low maternal depression, but not among families with high maternal depression. Children of depressed mothers exhibited uniformly higher externalizing scores, but were not further impacted by paternal alcohol problems. However, children of nondepressed mothers were adversely affected by fathers' drinking as reflected by higher externalizing behavior scores. The results highlight the necessity of addressing the overall contextual risks that occur with paternal alcoholism in studies of the development of children in alcoholic families.
PubMedId: 19436770
Journal-article: Infant mental health journal, vol. 22, 2009
Authors: Rina D. Eiden, Danielle S. Molnar, Craig Colder, Ellen P. Edwards, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 70, pp. 741-750, 2009
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Danielle S Molnar, Craig Colder, Ellen P Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 19737499
Comparative Study: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 70, 2009
Authors: Lorig K Kachadourian, Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Given the documented association between paternal alcoholism and negative parenting behaviors, the purpose of this study was to examine longitudinally whether marital satisfaction mediates this relationship. Participants consisted of 197 families (102 without an alcoholic father, 95 with an alcoholic father) who were assessed at three time points: when children were 12, 24, and 36 months old. Results indicated that paternal alcoholism at 12 months was associated with decreased marital satisfaction at 24 months for both mothers and fathers. Marital satisfaction at 24 months in turn was associated with decreases in parental warmth and sensitivity at 36 months. Furthermore, marital satisfaction mediated the association between paternal alcoholism and parental warmth and sensitivity for both mothers and fathers. The implications of these findings for interventions for alcoholic families are discussed.
PubMedId: 19541430
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 34, 2008
Authors: Katherine M Dollar, Gregory G Homish, Lynn T Kozlowski, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: We investigated the longitudinal influence of spousal and individual heavy drinking and heavy smoking on smoking cessation among married couples. Couples' (N = 634) past-year smoking, alcohol problems, and heavy drinking were assessed. We used an event history analysis and found that spousal and one's own heavy smoking and one's own heavy drinking decreased the likelihood of smoking cessation. Heavy drinking and spousal behavior should be considered when developing public health interventions and policies for smoking cessation.
PubMedId: 19059846
Journal-article: American journal of public health, vol. 99, 2008
Authors: Ellen P Edwards, Gregory G Homish, Rina D Eiden, Kerry K Grohman, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study sought to examine predictors of parenting trajectories in a sample of heavy drinking and abstaining/light drinking parents. Mixture modeling was used to estimate trajectories of parental discipline styles over time. Two dimensions of parenting were examined: laxness and overreactivity. Changes in these dimensions were examined for each parent. Trajectories for mothers and fathers were very similar and were generally stable from 18 months to 5-6 years child age. Fathers' binge drinking was associated with high levels of both paternal and maternal overreactivity. Mothers with depressed affect had the highest levels of overreactivity, whereas fathers reporting depressed affect were more likely to have moderate levels of laxness. Mothers with high levels of marital satisfaction were more likely to have partners in the stable low overreactivity group. Findings begin to elucidate the nature of early family processes that may contribute to maladaptive child outcomes in heavy drinking families.
PubMedId: 18818023
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 34, 2008
Authors: Julie A Schumacher, Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Brian M Quigley, Jill N Kearns-Bodkin
Abstract: Alcohol problems are one of the most well-established risk factors for physical intimate partner violence. Nonetheless, most individuals who drink heavily do so without ever aggressing against a partner. Laboratory research identifies hostility as an important moderator of the association between alcohol and general aggression, and correlational research suggests that stress and coping may also be important moderators of the alcohol-aggression link. Building on this research, the authors examined hostility, coping, and daily hassles as moderators of the associations between excessive drinking and intimate partner violence across the first 4 years of marriage in a sample of 634 newly married couples. Excessive drinking was a significant cross-sectional correlate, but it did not emerge as a unique longitudinal predictor of intimate partner violence perpetration in this sample. However, alcohol was longitudinally predictive of husband violence among hostile men with high levels of avoidance coping. Findings generally supported the moderation model, particularly for men. These findings implicate hostility, coping, and daily hassles, as well as alcohol, as potentially important targets for partner violence prevention strategies for young married couples.
PubMedId: 19102610
Journal-article: Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 22, 2008
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: To examine if one partner's premarital health behavior was longitudinally associated with his or her partner's health behaviors. Newlyweds were assessed at marriage and at 3 follow-ups with respect to frequency of general health behaviors: exercise, physical examinations, and healthy and unhealthy eating. One partner's health behavior prior to marriage was associated with the other partner's health behavior over time. This was true for positive and negative behaviors for both men and women. Understanding how partners influence each other's health behaviors is important for health promotion and intervention efforts. Targeting the couple for health promotion activities could benefit the couple more than simply targeting individuals.
PubMedId: 18442354
Journal-article: American journal of health behavior, vol. 32, 2008
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Gregory G Homish
Abstract: This study investigated the factors predictive of heavy drinking and drinking problems over the early years of marriage, focusing on premarital drinking and the relatively stable individual risk and protective factors that were present prior to marriage and on social-interpersonal factors that may change or emerge over marriage. Newlywed couples were assessed at the time of marriage and at the 1st, 2nd, and 4th anniversaries with respect to frequency of heavy drinking and the extent of drinking problems and a variety of factors that have been found to be predictive of adult alcohol problems. The results indicated that antisocial characteristics, family history of alcoholism, negative affect, and alcohol expectancies were related to heavy drinking and alcohol problems at the time of marriage. Changes after marriage were predicted by the drinking of one's partner and of one's peers and by alcohol expectancies for social/physical pleasure for both men and women. In addition, the quality of the marriage was longitudinally protective from the experience of alcohol problems for both men and women, although it was not related to changes in heavy drinking.
PubMedId: 18298228
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 22, 2008
Authors: Jill N. Kearns-Bodkin, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 69, pp. 941-950, 2008
Authors: Jill N Kearns-Bodkin, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 18925353
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 69, 2008
Authors: Gregory G. Homish, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 69, pp. 906-914, 2008
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 18925349
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 69, 2008
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Jack R Cornelius
Abstract: With the acquisition of adult social roles such as marriage, more deviant or socially disapproved behaviors such as drug use often decrease. The objective of this work was to examine patterns of illicit drug use in a community sample of adults during the transition and early years of marriage. Additionally, this work examined if couples who were discrepant in their drug use (i.e., one individual reported past year drug use and the partner reported no use) experience sharper declines in marital satisfaction compared to other couples. Multilevel regression models explored these issues over the first four years of marriage (N=634 couples). Although rates of illicit drug use decline over the first four years of marriage, a significant number of husbands and wives continued to use illicit drugs (21% and 16%, respectively). At the transition to marriage, both husbands and wives who had discrepant drug use behaviors experienced lower levels of marital satisfaction compared to other couples. Over the first four years of marriage, couples in each group experienced significant declines in marital satisfaction.
PubMedId: 17945436
Journal-article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 33, 2007
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Ellen P Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test a conceptual model predicting children's externalizing behavior problems in kindergarten in a sample of children with alcoholic (n = 130) and nonalcoholic (n = 97) parents. The model examined the role of parents' alcohol diagnoses, depression, and antisocial behavior at 12-18 months of child age in predicting parental warmth/sensitivity at 2 years of child age. Parental warmth/sensitivity at 2 years was hypothesized to predict children's self-regulation at 3 years (effortful control and internalization of rules), which in turn was expected to predict externalizing behavior problems in kindergarten. Structural equation modeling was largely supportive of this conceptual model. Fathers' alcohol diagnosis at 12-18 months was associated with lower maternal and paternal warmth/sensitivity at 2 years. Lower maternal warmth/sensitivity was longitudinally predictive of lower child self-regulation at 3 years, which in turn was longitudinally predictive of higher externalizing behavior problems in kindergarten, after controlling for prior behavior problems. There was a direct association between parents' depression and children's externalizing behavior problems. Results indicate that one pathway to higher externalizing behavior problems among children of alcoholics may be via parenting and self-regulation in the toddler to preschool years.
PubMedId: 17723044
Journal-article: Developmental psychology, vol. 43, 2007
Authors: R Lorraine Collins, Brian Quigley, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Although women drink in bars and experience aggression in bar settings, much of the research has focused on men's experiences of aggression in bars. We used data from questionnaires and face-to-face interviews to examine the contributors to the occurrence and severity of women's experience of specific incidents of aggression in bars. Young women (n=92) provided event-based descriptions of their most recent experience of physical aggression in a bar during the past 24 months. Most aggression in bars was precipitated by rowdy behavior and involved female opponents who were strangers. The severity and overall aggressiveness of the respondent's behaviors were positively associated with initiating the incident and having a female opponent. The severity and overall aggressiveness of the opponent's behaviors were negatively associated with initiating the incident and positively associated with having a female opponent. This study adds to the paucity of research on women's aggression in bars and expands our understanding of women's roles as perpetrator and victim of such aggression.
PubMedId: 17593557
Journal-article: Aggressive behavior, vol. 33, 2007
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: The objective was to determine whether discrepancies between husbands' and wives' past-year heavy drinking predicted decreased marital satisfaction over time. Participants (N = 634) were recruited at the time they applied for their marriage licenses. Couples completed questionnaires about their alcohol use and marital satisfaction at the time of marriage and again at their 1st and 2nd anniversaries. Generalized estimating equation models were used to evaluate the association between discrepancies in husbands' and wives' heavy drinking in the year prior to marriage and marital satisfaction at the 1st wedding anniversary and the association between discrepancies in heavy alcohol use in the 1st year of marriage and marital satisfaction at the 2nd wedding anniversary. In these prospective time-lagged analyses, discrepancies in husbands' and wives' heavy drinking predicted decreased marital satisfaction over time while controlling for heavy drinking. Over time, these couples may be at greater risk for decreased marital functioning that may lead to relationship dissolution.
PubMedId: 17295562
Journal-article: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 75, 2007
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Rina D Eiden
Abstract: Alcohol use is often part of the fabric of marriage and family life, and although it is associated with certain positive effects, excessive drinking and alcohol disorders can exert a negative effect on the marital development and on the development of children in the context of the family. This review considers evidence that alcohol influences and is influenced by marital/family processes, including transitions into marriage and parenthood, marital satisfaction, marital violence, parenting, and child development. The review discusses the importance of antisocial behavior and the need to examine women's drinking, and the joint impact of men's and women's drinking on marital/family processes. The review highlights the lack of studies in certain key areas, including the link between discordant drinking and violence and marital satisfaction, the role of alcohol in child neglect, and the potential role of marital conflict as a mediator or moderator of the relationship between alcohol and child functioning.
PubMedId: 17716057
Journal-article: Annual review of clinical psychology, vol. 3, 2007
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine if a spouse's expectations about a married person's drinking patterns affected his/her partner's alcohol use and alcohol use-related problems. Alcohol use and problems were assessed in a U.S. urban sample of 634 couples at the time they applied for their marriage license (1996-1999) and at their first and second anniversaries. Husbands' expectations about married women's alcohol use, as well as wives' expectations about married men's alcohol use, were assessed at each wave using a three-item scale. Linear regression models were used to identify the longitudinal association between a person's expectations of married individuals' drinking patterns and his/her spouse's alcohol use the following year. Evidence was found to support the relation between one spouse's expectations and his/her partner's alcohol use. However, wives' expectations appeared more influential compared to husbands and this influence is not present at the start of marriage, but rather develops slightly later. The study's limitations are noted.
PubMedId: 17886140
Journal-article: Substance use & misuse, vol. 42, 2007
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Jack R Cornelius
Abstract: With the transition into marriage, marijuana and other substance use tends to decline; however, this is not true for all individuals. The objective of this work was to examine the impact of premarital individual and partner psychological health and substance use behaviors on the likelihood of using marijuana over the first four years of marriage. Couples' (N=634) marijuana use, other substance use, and psychological variables were assessed at the time they applied for their marriage license and then again at the first, second and fourth anniversaries. Generalized estimating equation models were used to estimate the risk for using marijuana over the first four years of marriage after controlling for the natural decrease in risk associated with time and other relevant sociodemographic variables. Smoking prior to marriage and heavy alcohol use was associated with an increased risk for using marijuana over the first four years of marriage for both husbands and wives. After considering the impact of time and individual risk factors, a spouse's use of marijuana prior to marriage was a strong predictor of increased risk for marijuana use during the first four years of marriage.
PubMedId: 17600639
Journal-article: Drug and alcohol dependence, vol. 91, 2006
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Ellen P Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study examined the association between fathers' alcoholism and children's internalization of rules of conduct at 2 to 3 years of age. The sample consisted of 220 families (102 without alcoholism, 118 with alcoholism). Results indicated that there was no direct association between fathers' alcoholism and children's internalization measured with a behavioral paradigm at age 3 years. However, the indirect association between fathers' alcoholism and children's behavioral internalization was significant through fathers' sensitivity during play interactions at age 2 years. Children of fathers with alcoholism were rated by their mothers as having lower internalized conduct over the 2- to 3-year period. This direct association was not mediated by parental sensitivity.
PubMedId: 16938068
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 20, 2006
Authors: Maria Testa, Mark T Fillmore, Jeanette Norris, Antonia Abbey, John J Curtin, Kenneth E Leonard, Kristin A Mariano, Margaret C Thomas, Kim J Nomensen, William H George, Carol Vanzile-Tamsen, Jennifer A Livingston, Christopher Saenz, Philip O Buck, Tina Zawacki, Michele R Parkhill, Angela J Jacques, Lenwood W Hayman
Abstract: This article summarizes a symposium organized and cochaired by Maria Testa and presented at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, in Santa Barbara, California. The symposium explored issues relevant to understanding the function of placebo conditions and to interpreting placebo effects. Cochair Mark Fillmore began with an overview of the use of placebo conditions in alcohol research, focusing on methodological issues. Jeanette Norris and her colleagues conducted a review of studies examining placebo conditions among women. They conclude that expectancy effects are limited to a few domains. Maria Testa and Antonia Abbey presented papers suggesting that placebo manipulations may result in unanticipated compensatory effects in actual or hypothetical social situations. That is, placebo participants may compensate for anticipated cognitive impairment through vigilant attention to situational cues. John Curtin's research suggests that the compensatory strategies of placebo participants appear to involve a sensitization of evaluative control, resulting in improved performance. Kenneth Leonard provided concluding remarks on the meaning of placebo effects and the value of placebo conditions in research.
PubMedId: 16441283
Journal-article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 30, 2006
Authors: Robert A Zucker, Maria M Wong, Duncan B Clark, Kenneth E Leonard, John E Schulenberg, Jack R Cornelius, Hiram E Fitzgerald, Gregory G Homish, Alicia Merline, Joel T Nigg, Patrick M O'Malley, Leon I Puttler
Abstract: This paper summarizes the proceedings of a symposium presented at the 2005 Research Society on Alcoholism meeting in Santa Barbara, California, that spans the interval from toddlerhood to early middle adulthood and addresses questions about how far ahead developmentally we can anticipate alcohol problems and related substance use disorder and how such work informs our understanding of the causes and course of alcohol problems and alcohol use disorder. The context of these questions both historically and developmentally is set by Robert Zucker in an introductory section. Next, Maria Wong and colleagues describe the developmental trajectories of behavioral and affective control from preschool to early adolescence in a high risk for alcoholism longitudinal study and demonstrate their ability to predict alcohol and drug outcomes in adolescence. Duncan Clark and Jack Cornelius follow with a report on the predictive utility of parental disruptive behavior disorders in predicting onset of alcohol problems in their adolescent offspring in late adolescence. Next, Kenneth Leonard and Gregory Homish report on adult development study findings relating baseline individual, spouse, and peer network drinking indicators at marriage onset that distinguish different patterns of stability and change in alcohol problems over the first 2 years of marriage. In the final paper, John Schulenberg and colleagues, utilizing national panel data from the Monitoring the Future Study, which cover the 18- to 35-year age span, show how trajectories of alcohol use in early adulthood predict differential alcohol abuse and dependence outcomes at age 35. Finally, Robert Zucker examines the degree to which the core symposium questions are answered and comments on next step research and clinical practice changes that are called for by these findings.
PubMedId: 16441273
Journal-article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 30, 2006
Authors: ELLEN P. EDWARDS, RINA DAS EIDEN, KENNETH E. LEONARD
Journal-article: Development and Psychopathology, vol. 18, 2006
Authors: Ellen P Edwards, Rina Das Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 16830441
Journal Article: Development and psychopathology, vol. 18, 2006
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Gregory G Homish
PubMedId: 17186062
Journal Article: Journal of drug issues, vol. 35, 2006
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard, Jill N Kearns-Bodkin
Abstract: Individuals married to heavy drinking spouses often have poorer health compared to those whose spouses are not heavy drinkers. This work examined how one spouse's alcohol involvement and alcohol-related problems affect his/her spouse's depressive symptomatology over time. Couples (N=634) were assessed for past year alcohol involvement and alcohol-related problems (marital and non-marital) and depressive symptomatology when they applied for a marriage license. They were reassessed at their first and second anniversaries. Multilevel models were used to analyze the association between one spouse's alcohol involvement and alcohol problems and his/her partner's depressive symptomatology over time. Both husbands' and wives' marital alcohol problems were associated with wives' depressive symptoms. Neither spouses' alcohol consumption was associated with wives' depressive symptoms. Husbands' marriage-related alcohol problems and frequency of heavy drinking were related to husbands' depressive symptoms; however, wives' alcohol problems and alcohol use were unrelated to husbands' depression. In a community sample of married couples, we found that husbands' and wives' marital alcohol problems affect wives' depressive symptoms, but only husbands' marital alcohol problems affect husbands' depressive symptoms. Future work should consider other subgroups of alcohol-related problems in one spouse and their relation to depression in his/her partner.
PubMedId: 16337752
Journal-article: Drug and alcohol dependence, vol. 83, 2005
Authors: Steven R H Beach, Frank D Fincham, Nader Amir, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study used taxometric methods to investigate the latent structure of the construct of marital adjustment as indexed by the Marital Adjustment Test (MAT; H. J. Locke & K. M. Wallace, 1959). That is, the authors examined whether marital adjustment is best thought of as a "dimension" of adjustment only or whether there also are categorical differences between "discordant" and "nondiscordant" couples. Analyses of data provided by 447 couples married for approximately 2 years provided converging evidence for a latent category of marital discord, suggesting that marital discord can be viewed as a qualitatively distinct state experienced by approximately 20% of the couples in the current sample. Implications for marital assessment are outlined.
PubMedId: 15982105
Journal-article: Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 19, 2005
Authors: Julie A Schumacher, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Marital adjustment, verbal aggression, and physical aggression have long been associated in the marital literature, but the nature of their associations remains unclear. In this study, the authors examined these 3 constructs as risk factors for physical aggression during the first 2 years of marriage in 634 couples recruited as they applied for marriage licenses. Couples completed assessments at the time of marriage and at their 1st and 2nd anniversaries. Results of path analyses suggest that prior verbal aggression and physical aggression by both partners are important longitudinal predictors of physical aggression but do not support the role of marital adjustment as a unique predictor of subsequent physical aggression. Contrary to prior research, results also failed to support physical aggression as a unique predictor of marital adjustment.
PubMedId: 15709829
Journal-article: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 73, 2005
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Pamela Mudar
Abstract: Previous research indicates that husbands' drinking before marriage is predictive of wives' drinking after marriage. A relationship motivation model was tested in which this influence was moderated by wives' dependence, relationship satisfaction, peer group size, and the belief that alcohol positively impacts relationships. Newlyweds were assessed at the time of marriage and were reassessed at their 1st and 2nd anniversaries. Results supported a relationship motivation model. Husband-to-wife drinking influence was moderated by wives' interpersonal dependence, number of peers, and positive relationship alcohol expectancies. The direction of the spousal influence changed in the 2nd year of marriage, with wives' drinking over the 1st year predicting husbands' drinking in the 2nd. Implications with respect to marriage and the drinking partnership are discussed.
PubMedId: 15631606
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 18, 2005
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard, Rick H Hoyle, Felipa Chavez
Abstract: This study examined the transactional nature of parent-infant interactions over time among alcoholic and nonalcoholic families. The sample consisted of 222 families assessed at 12, 18, and 24 months of child age. Results indicated that infant behavior did not influence parental behavior across time, but parental behavior was longitudinally predictive of infant behavior during play interactions. Higher paternal alcohol consumption at 12 months was longitudinally predictive of negative parental behavior at 24 months. Other significant risk factors included marital conflict, fathers' depression, and fathers' education. Results highlight the nested nature of risk in alcoholic families and the direction of influence from parent to child during interactions and suggest that 1 pathway to risk among these children is through negative parent-infant interactions.
PubMedId: 15631607
Journal-article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 18, 2005
Authors: Jill N. Kearns-Bodkin, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 29, pp. 2123-2134, 2005
Authors: Jill N Kearns-Bodkin, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 16385182
Journal Article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 29, 2005
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 16240556
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 66, pp. 488-496, 2005
Authors: Kenneth R Conner, Silva Sorensen, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 16047530
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 66, pp. 401-406, 2005
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Gregory G. Homish
Journal-article: Journal of Drug Issues, vol. 35, pp. 409-430, 2005
Authors: K. S. Griswold, T. J. Servoss, K. E. Leonard, P. A. Pastore, S. J. Smith, C. Wagner, M. Stephan, M. Thrist
Journal-article: The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, vol. 18, pp. 166-172, 2005
Authors: Kim S Griswold, Timothy J Servoss, Kenneth E Leonard, Patricia A Pastore, Susan J Smith, Christine Wagner, Margaret Stephan, Mary Thrist
PubMedId: 15879563
Comparative Study: The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice, vol. 18, 2005
Authors: Gregory G. Homish, Kenneth E. Leonard, R. Lorraine Collins, Brian M. Quigley
Journal-article: Journal of Substance Use, vol. 10, pp. 355-361, 2005
Authors: Ellen P Edwards, Rina D Eiden, Craig Colder, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study examined the development of aggressive and oppositional behavior among alcoholic and nonalcoholic families using latent growth modeling. The sample consisted of 226 families assessed at 18, 24, 36, and 48 months of child age. Results indicated that children in families with nonalcoholic parents had the lowest levels of aggressive behavior at all time points compared to children with one or more alcoholic parents. Children in families with two alcoholic parents did not exhibit normative decreases in aggressive behavior from 3 to 4 years of age compared to nonalcoholic families. However, this association was no longer significant once a cumulative family risk score was added to the model. Children in families with high cumulative risk scores, reflective of high parental depression, antisocial behavior, negative affect during play, difficult child temperament, marital conflict, fathers' education, and hours spent in child care, had higher levels of aggression at 18 months than children in low risk families. These associations were moderated by child gender. Boys had higher levels of aggressive behavior at all ages than girls, regardless of group status. Cumulative risk was predictive of higher levels of initial aggressive behavior in both girls and boys. However, boys with two alcoholic parents had significantly less of a decline in aggression from 36 to 48 months compared to boys in the nonalcoholic group.
PubMedId: 16649002
Journal-article: Journal of abnormal child psychology, vol. 34, 2004
Authors: Gregory G Homish, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Among married couples, partners often have similar characteristics and behaviors. Among individuals who smoke cigarettes, it is not uncommon for them to have a partner who also smokes. In fact, having a partner who smokes can influence the spouse's initiation of smoking, or return to smoking after a previous quit attempt. Additionally, it is possible that a nonsmoking partner can influence his/her spouse to stop smoking. Participants for this research are from a community sample of couples in the United States. They were recruited at the time they applied for their marriage license and followed through to their second wedding anniversary. Logistic regression models, controlling for demographics, were utilized to determine if a partner's smoking status predicted smoking initiation or relapse over the early years of marriage. Overall, there was some support that a partner's smoking status did influence the other's smoking, although more support was found for spousal influence on relapse than cessation. There was more support for husband's influence compared to wife's influence, nonsmoking wives were more likely to resume smoking in the early years of their marriage if their partners were smokers. Wives' smoking, however, did not predict husband initiation of smoking. These findings suggest that during the transition into marriage, spouses do influence their partners' behaviors. In particular, women are more likely to resume smoking, or return to smoking if their partners smoke.
PubMedId: 15978712
Journal-article: Social science & medicine (1982), vol. 61, 2004
Authors: Jill N Kearns, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: This study examined the relationship between couples' network interdependence and marital quality in a sample of 347 couples that were recruited at the time of their first marriage. Husbands and wives completed separate, self-administered questionnaires at home. Analyses are based on data collected at the time of marriage, at the first anniversary, and at the second anniversary. Results indicated that after marriage, husbands' and wives' friend and family networks became increasingly interdependent. Moreover, the interdependence of the friend and family networks at marriage predicted wives' marital quality at the first anniversary, whereas wives' marital quality at the first anniversary predicted the interdependence of the friend network at the second anniversary. No significant longitudinal relations were observed for husbands.
PubMedId: 15222845
Journal-article: Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 18, 2004
Authors: Rina D Eiden, Ellen P Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 15222587
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 65, pp. 309-319, 2004
Authors: Maria Testa, Brian M Quigley, Kenneth E Leonard
Abstract: Episodes of husband-to-wife violence in which the husband consumed alcohol were compared with episodes of husband-to-wife violence, reported by the same individuals, in which the husband was not drinking. Among this community sample of newlyweds, wife reports, but not husband reports, indicated that violent episodes in which the husband was drinking included more acts of violence and were more likely to involve severe violence. Both wife and husband reports indicated that wives were more likely to be physically aggressive in husband drinking episodes compared to sober episodes. However, whereas wives reported that their aggressive behavior was a response to husband aggression, husbands reported that wives were more likely to initiate violence in these episodes. Violent episodes that include alcohol may be more severe and more mutually violent than sober episodes. Discrepancies between husband and wife reports may reflect differences in recall or self-serving biases.
PubMedId: 14675506
Journal-article: Journal of interpersonal violence, vol. 18, 2003
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Brian M Quigley, R.Lorraine Collins
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, pp. 1681-1700, 2003
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Brian M Quigley, R Lorraine Collins
PubMedId: 14656553
Journal Article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 28, 2003
Authors: Maria Testa, Jennifer A Livingston, Kenneth E Leonard
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 28, pp. 1649-1664, 2003
Authors: Maria Testa, Jennifer A Livingston, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 14656551
Journal Article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 28, 2003
Authors: Brian M Quigley, Kenneth E Leonard, R Lorraine Collins
PubMedId: 14743938
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 64, pp. 765-772, 2003
Authors: Maria Testa, Brian M. Quigley, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 18, pp. 735-743, 2003
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Pamela Mudar
Journal-article: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, vol. 17, pp. 115-125, 2003
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Pamela Mudar
PubMedId: 12814275
Journal Article: Psychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, vol. 17, 2003
Authors: Julie A Schumacher, William Fals-Stewart, Kenneth E Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, vol. 24, pp. 279-283, 2003
Authors: Julie A Schumacher, William Fals-Stewart, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 12810149
Journal Article: Journal of substance abuse treatment, vol. 24, 2003
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, R. Lorraine Collins, Brian M. Quigley
Journal-article: Aggressive Behavior, vol. 29, pp. 346-365, 2003
Authors: Pamela Mudar, Jill N Kearns, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 12380853
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 63, pp. 568-576, 2002
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Rina Das Eiden
Journal-article: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 67, pp. 139-147, 2002
Authors: Kenneth E Leonard, Rina Das Eiden
PubMedId: 12095663
Comparative Study: Drug and alcohol dependence, vol. 67, 2002
Authors: RINA DAS EIDEN, ELLEN PETERSON EDWARDS, KENNETH E. LEONARD
Journal-article: Development and Psychopathology, vol. 14, 2002
Authors: Rina Das Eiden, Ellen Peterson Edwards, Kenneth E Leonard
PubMedId: 12030691
Journal Article: Development and psychopathology, vol. 14, 2002
Authors: Maria Testa, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Family Violence, vol. 16, pp. 115-130, 2001
Authors: R. Lorraine Collins, Brian M. Quigley, Kenneth E. Leonard
Book-chapter: Prevention and Control of Aggression and the Impact on its Victims, pp. 275-282, 2001
Authors: Rina Das Eiden, Kenneth E. Leonard, Sean Morrisey
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 25, pp. 1621-1633, 2001
Authors: Rina Das Eiden, Kenneth E. Leonard, Sean Morrisey
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 25, pp. 1621-1633, 2001
Authors: R Das Eiden, K E Leonard, S Morrisey
PubMedId: 11707637
Journal Article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 25, 2001
Authors: M Testa, K E Leonard
PubMedId: 11688926
Journal Article: Violence and victims, vol. 16, 2001
Authors: Theodore Jacob, Kenneth E. Leonard, Jon Randolph Haber
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 25, pp. 835-843, 2001
Authors: Theodore Jacob, Kenneth E. Leonard, Jon Randolph Haber
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 25, pp. 835-843, 2001
Authors: T Jacob, K E Leonard, J Randolph Haber
PubMedId: 11410718
Journal Article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 25, 2001
Authors: Pamela Mudar, Kenneth E. Leonard, Kerry Soltysinski
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 69, pp. 130-134, 2001
Authors: Pamela Mudar, Kenneth E. Leonard, Kerry Soltysinski
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 69, pp. 130-134, 2001
Authors: P Mudar, K E Leonard, K Soltysinski
PubMedId: 11302271
Comparative Study: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 69, 2001
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Pamela J. Mudar
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 24, pp. 1666-1679, 2000
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Pamela J. Mudar
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 24, pp. 1666-1679, 2000
Authors: K E Leonard, P J Mudar
PubMedId: 11104114
Journal Article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 24, 2000
Authors: K E Leonard, J Kearns, P Mudar
PubMedId: 11022805
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 61, pp. 669-673, 2000
Authors: Brian M. Quigley, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 24, pp. 1003-1010, 2000
Authors: Brian M. Quigley, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 24, pp. 1003-1010, 2000
Authors: B M Quigley, K E Leonard
PubMedId: 10924003
Journal Article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 24, 2000
Authors: T Jacob, J R Haber, K E Leonard, R Rushe
PubMedId: 10627099
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 61, pp. 72-80, 2000
Authors: Rina Das Eiden, Kenneth E Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Substance Abuse, vol. 11, pp. 17-29, 2000
Authors: R Das Eiden, K E Leonard
PubMedId: 10756511
Journal Article: Journal of substance abuse, vol. 11, 2000
Authors: R D Eiden, F Chavez, K E Leonard
PubMedId: 10624724
Journal Article: Development and psychopathology, vol. 11, 2000
Authors: K E Leonard, B M Quigley
PubMedId: 10463811
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 60, pp. 537-545, 1999
Authors: K E Leonard, R Das Eiden
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Supplement, pp. 130-138, 1999
Authors: K E Leonard, R Das Eiden
PubMedId: 10225497
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol. Supplement, vol. 13, 1999
Authors: K E Leonard, J C Rothbard
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Supplement, pp. 139-146, 1999
Authors: K E Leonard, J C Rothbard
PubMedId: 10225498
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol. Supplement, vol. 13, 1999
Authors: RINA DAS EIDEN, FELIPA CHAVEZ, KENNETH E. LEONARD
Journal-article: Development and Psychopathology, vol. 11, pp. 745-762, 1999
Authors: Kathryn Graham, Kenneth E. Leonard, Robin Room, T. Cameron Wild, Robert O. Pihl, Christine Bois, Eric Single
Publication: Addiction, vol. 93, pp. 659-676, 1998
Authors: K Graham, K E Leonard, R Room, T C Wild, R O Pihl, C Bois, E Single
PubMedId: 9692266
Journal Article: Addiction (Abingdon, England), vol. 93, 1998
Authors: B M Quigley, K E Leonard
PubMedId: 9210277
Journal Article: Violence and victims, vol. 11, 1996
Authors: M Senchak, B W Greene, A Carroll, K Leonard
PubMedId: 8913995
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 57, pp. 638-645, 1996
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Marilyn Senchak
Journal-article: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 105, pp. 369-380, 1996
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Marilyn Senchak
Journal-article: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 105, pp. 369-380, 1996
Authors: K E Leonard, M Senchak
PubMedId: 8772007
Journal Article: Journal of abnormal psychology, vol. 105, 1996
Authors: K E Leonard, M Senchak
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Supplement, pp. 96-108, 1993
Authors: K E Leonard, M Senchak
PubMedId: 8410969
Journal Article: Journal of studies on alcohol. Supplement, vol. 11, 1993
Authors: C Miller-Tutzauer, K E Leonard, M Windle
PubMedId: 1943098
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 52, pp. 434-440, 1991
Authors: Theodore Jacob, Gloria L. Krahn, Kenneth Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 59, pp. 176-181, 1991
Authors: Theodore Jacob, Gloria L. Krahn, Kenneth Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 59, pp. 176-181, 1991
Authors: T Jacob, G L Krahn, K Leonard
PubMedId: 2002135
Journal Article: Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, vol. 59, 1991
Authors: CATHLEEN CARTER, THOMAS H. NOCHAJSKI, KENNETH E. LEONARD, HOWARD T. BLANE
Journal-article: Addiction, vol. 85, pp. 1157-1163, 1990
Authors: C Carter, T H Nochajski, K E Leonard, H T Blane
PubMedId: 2224195
Journal Article: British journal of addiction, vol. 85, 1990
Authors: S Johnson, K E Leonard, T Jacob
PubMedId: 2779244
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 50, pp. 427-431, 1989
Authors: M K Harwood, K E Leonard
PubMedId: 2724968
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 50, pp. 210-216, 1989
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 15, pp. 390-400, 1989
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Margaret K. Harwood, Howard T. Blane
Journal-article: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 12, pp. 394-399, 1988
Authors: K E Leonard, M K Harwood, H T Blane
PubMedId: 3044169
Journal Article: Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research, vol. 12, 1988
Authors: Theodore Jacob, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 97, pp. 231-237, 1988
Authors: Theodore Jacob, Kenneth E. Leonard
Journal-article: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 97, pp. 231-237, 1988
Authors: T Jacob, K E Leonard
PubMedId: 3385076
Journal Article: Journal of abnormal psychology, vol. 97, 1988
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Howard T. Blane
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 13, pp. 353-357, 1988
Authors: K E Leonard, H T Blane
PubMedId: 3239466
Journal Article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 13, 1988
Authors: T Jacob, K Leonard
PubMedId: 3762160
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 47, pp. 373-380, 1986
Authors: D Richardson, K Leonard, S Taylor, G Hammock
Abstract: The present study focused on the effects of two variables that have been proposed as determinants of male violence toward female targets in American society. One target variable, verbal attack, and one aggressor variable, masculine performance, were manipulated. Forty male research participants competed in a reaction-time task with a female confederate who had previously criticized them or remained silent when the males' performance on a physical strength task appeared to be average or considerably below the norms for male performance. The significant interaction between the two variables indicated that inhibitions against harming females were reduced when the male performed poorly on a masculine task in the presence of a female who criticized his performance. Results are discussed in terms of their relevance to control and understanding of male-to-female aggression in the natural ecology.
PubMedId: 4078763
Journal-article: The Journal of psychology, vol. 119, 1985
Authors: K E Leonard, E J Bromet, D K Parkinson, N L Day, C M Ryan
PubMedId: 4033127
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 46, pp. 279-282, 1985
Authors: Kenneth E. Leonard, Evelyn J. Bromet, David K. Parkinson, Nancy Day
Journal-article: Addictive Behaviors, vol. 9, pp. 319-322, 1984
Authors: K E Leonard, E J Bromet, D K Parkinson, N Day
PubMedId: 6496211
Journal Article: Addictive behaviors, vol. 9, 1984
Authors: K E Leonard
PubMedId: 6700223
Journal-article: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, vol. 45, pp. 75-80, 1984
Authors: G T Schmutte, K E Leonard, S P Taylor
PubMedId: 542558
Journal-article: Psychological reports, vol. 45, 1979
Authors: Jaye L. Derrick, Kenneth E. Leonard
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Kenneth Leonard, B. Quigley, M. Testa, R. Houston
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: R. L. Collins, B. M. Quigley, K. E. Leonard
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Brian M. Quigley, Kenneth E. Leonard, R. Lorraine Collins
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: J. J. Winters, J. N. KearnsBodkin, G. G. Homish, A. J. Kubiak, K. E. Leonard
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Kenneth Leonard, Julie A. Schumacher, Gregory G. Homish, Brain M. Quigley
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Maria Testa, Cory Crane, Kenneth E. Leonard
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Presented by CUBS © 2022