UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Jennifer L. Temple UB Profile
Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Community Health and Health Behavior
Associate Professor
Director, Nutrition and Health Research Laboratory
Graduate Program Director
G01 Farber Hall
Buffalo NY 14214
716-829-5593
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Amanda M. Ziegler, Amanda K. Crandall, Tegan Mansouri, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: International Journal of Obesity, vol. 44, pp. 1918-1927, 2020
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Katelyn A. Carr, Alexis O'Brien, Rocco A. Paluch, Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Eating Behaviors, vol. 38, pp. 101414, 2020
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Rocco A. Paluch, Katelyn A. Carr, Jennifer L. Temple, Warren K. Bickel, James MacKillop
Journal-article: Eating Behaviors, vol. 29, pp. 120-127, 2018
Authors: Leonard H. Epstein, Katelyn A. Carr, Jennifer L. Scheid, Eden Gebre, Alexis O'Brien, Rocco A. Paluch, Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 91, pp. 226-232, 2015
Authors: Leah M. Panek, Kelly R. Jones, Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 81, pp. 320-329, 2014
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 136, pp. 97-103, 2014
Authors: J. L. Temple, A. M. Ziegler, A. Graczyk, A. Bendlin, T. Sion, K. Vattana
Journal-article: PEDIATRICS, vol. 134, pp. e112-e119, 2014
Authors: Leah M. Panek, Christine Swoboda, Ashley Bendlin, Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 227, pp. 425-436, 2013
Authors: Christine Swoboda, Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Eating Behaviors, vol. 14, pp. 149-156, 2013
Authors: Patrick Schrader, Leah M. Panek, Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Nutrition Research, vol. 33, pp. 457-463, 2013
Authors: Leah M. Panek-Scarborough, Amber M. Dewey, Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Physiology & Behavior, vol. 105, pp. 1242-1249, 2012
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Amanda M. Ziegler, Adam Graczyk, Ashley Bendlin, Shannon O???Leary, Yasemin S. Schnittker
Journal-article: Psychopharmacology, vol. 223, pp. 37-45, 2012
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Amanda M. Ziegler
Journal-article: Journal of Caffeine Research, vol. 1, pp. 41-48, 2011
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Karena Johnson, Kelly Recupero, Heather Suders
Journal-article: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 111, pp. S52-S55, 2011
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Karena M. Johnson, Kelli Archer, Allison LaCarte, Christina Yi, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 57, pp. 184-192, 2011
Authors: J L Temple, L H Epstein
Journal-article: International Journal of Obesity, vol. 36, pp. 1102-1107, 2011
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Amber M. Dewey, Laura N. Briatico
Journal-article: Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 18, pp. 510-520, 2010
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, Alison M Bulkley, Rebecca L Badawy, Nicole Krause, Sarah McCann, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Food reinforcement, ie, motivation to obtain food, is associated with energy intake and obesity. Finding ways to decrease the reinforcing value of unhealthy foods may help with adherence to diets and maintenance of weight loss. Our previous study in nonobese adults showed that daily consumption of the same snack food (food consumed apart from meals) for 14 d significantly decreased its reinforcing value. The aims of this study were to replicate and extend these findings to obese individuals and to examine the effects of different portion sizes of snack foods on food reinforcement. Food reinforcement and liking were tested in 31 obese and 27 nonobese women at baseline and after 2 wk of daily consumption of 0, 100, or 300 kcal/d of the same snack food. We found a significant interaction of phase, portion size, and body mass index on the pattern of operant responding for food. Obese women had a significant increase in food reinforcement after consuming the 300-kcal portion of food for 2 wk, whereas nonobese women had the opposite response. No significant differences were found on the reinforcing value with the 0- and 100-kcal portion-size conditions. Women in the 300-kcal group (obese and nonobese) reported a significant decrease in snack food liking from baseline to after daily intake. These findings suggest that obese and nonobese women respond differently to the daily intake of a snack food and that this may not be a viable mechanism for reducing food reinforcement in obese women. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00837694.
PubMedId: 19458018
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 90, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Robinson, Jennifer L Temple, James N Roemmich, Angela Marusewski, Rachel Nadbrzuch
Abstract: The rate of habituation to food is inversely related to energy intake, and overweight children may habituate slower to food and consume more energy. This study compared patterns of sensitization, as defined by an initial increase in operant or motivated responding for food, and habituation, defined by gradual reduction in responding, for macaroni and cheese and pizza in overweight and non-overweight 8-12 year-old children. Non-overweight children habituated faster to both foods than overweight children (p = 0.03). All children recovered motivated responding for a new food (chocolate). Overweight children consumed more energy than non-overweight children (p = 0.0004). Children who showed a sensitization in responding consumed more food (p = 0.001), and sensitization moderated the effect of overweight on habituation, with slower habituation for overweight children who sensitized (p < 0.0001). This study replicates previous data on overweight/non-overweight differences in habituation of food and of energy intake, and provides new information that individual differences in sensitization and habituation of motivated responding to food cues may be associated with a sustained motivation to eat, resulting in greater energy intake.
PubMedId: 19649135
Journal-article: Learning and motivation, vol. 39, 2009
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple
Journal-article: Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 33, pp. 793-806, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jennifer L Temple, James N Roemmich, Mark E Bouton
Abstract: Research has shown that animals and humans habituate on a variety of behavioral and physiological responses to repeated presentations of food cues, and habituation is related to amount of food consumed and cessation of eating. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of experimental paradigms used to study habituation, integrate a theoretical approach to habituation to food based on memory and associative conditioning models, and review research on factors that influence habituation. Individual differences in habituation as they relate to obesity and eating disorders are reviewed, along with research on how individual differences in memory can influence habituation. Other associative conditioning approaches to ingestive behavior are reviewed, as well as how habituation provides novel approaches to preventing or treating obesity. Finally, new directions for habituation research are presented. Habituation provides a novel theoretical framework from which to understand factors that regulate ingestive behavior.
PubMedId: 19348547
Journal-article: Psychological review, vol. 116, 2009
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jodie L Robinson, Jennifer L Temple, James N Roemmich, Angela L Marusewski, Rachel L Nadbrzuch
Abstract: Research has shown that variety reduces the rate of habituation, or a general reduction in the rate of responding, for low-energy-density (LED) and high-energy-density (HED) foods. We assessed whether the effects of variety on habituation of motivation to eat are different in overweight and lean children. Overweight and lean children (n = 84) were randomly assigned to groups that varied as to whether they received their favorite or a variety of LED or HED foods. Habituation was slower for overweight than for nonoverweight children (P = 0.008), for a variety of foods than for the same foods (P < 0.001), and for LED than for HED foods (P < 0.001). Energy intake was greater for overweight than for nonoverweight children provided with variety (P = 0.004) and was greater for overweight or nonoverweight children provided with the same food (P < 0.001). A variety of HED foods increased energy intake more than did the same HED foods (P < 0.001); this increase was greater than energy intake with the same or a variety of LED foods (P < 0.001). Children who sensitized, or showed an increase in responding before habituating, showed slower habituation (P < 0.001) and consumed more energy (P = 0.039) than did children who did not sensitize. Habituation is influenced by variety of foods, and overweight children increase energy intake more with variety than do leaner children. Research is needed to evaluate mechanisms of how variety influences the motivation to eat and energy intake, and how the variety effect can be used to influence intake across multiple eating occasions in children.
PubMedId: 19176724
Journal-article: The American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 89, 2009
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Alison M. Bulkley, Laura Briatico, Amber M. Dewey
Journal-article: Behavioural Pharmacology, vol. 20, pp. 731-741, 2009
Authors: Erika N Clark, Amber M Dewey, Jennifer L Temple
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 91, pp. 300-308, 2009
Authors: Jennifer L. Temple, Ashley Chappel, Jennifer Shalik, Suzanne Volcy, Leonard H. Epstein
Journal-article: Eating Behaviors, vol. 9, pp. 267-276, 2008
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: The purpose of these studies was to test the hypothesis that dietary variety decreases the rate of habituation and increases energy intake in children. In Experiment 1, salivation in response to the same or a variety of food cues was measured followed by consumption of the study food(s). In Experiment 2, children responded in a computer task to earn points for the same or a variety of low or high energy density foods, which were then consumed. Salivation, number of responses, and energy intake were measured. Participants in the same groups habituated faster than those in the variety groups (p = .05), and in Experiment 2, the effect of variety was independent of energy density. Participants in the variety groups also consumed more energy than those in the same groups in both experiments (p = .05). Dietary variety disrupted habituation and increased energy intake in children. In addition, the response to dietary variety was independent of energy density, suggesting that increasing variety of low energy density foods may increase consumption.
PubMedId: 18248101
Journal-article: Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 27, 2008
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, Christina M Legierski, April M Giacomelli, Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 18469229
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 87, pp. 1121-1127, 2008
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, Kristine M Kent, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
PubMedId: 17284729
Journal-article: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 85, pp. 355-361, 2007
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: We have shown that physiological and behavioral responses habituate to food stimuli and recover when novel stimuli are presented. In addition, physiological responses in obese adults habituate slower to repeated food stimuli than those in non-obese individuals, which is related to greater energy intake. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that instrumental responding in overweight children habituates slower to food cues than in their non-overweight peers. Children were provided the opportunity to work for access to cheeseburger for 10 2-min trials, followed by French fries for 3 2-min trials. Results showed that children who had a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 85th BMI percentile (at risk for overweight; n=17) habituated slower than those with a BMI percentile less than the 85th BMI percentile (non-overweight; n=17). Response recovery to French fries did not differ between groups. Overweight children consumed significantly more grams of food and more energy than non-overweight children. When taken together, these data show that habituation may be an important individual difference characteristic that differentiates overweight from non-overweight children. Implications of this for prevention and treatment of obesity are discussed.
PubMedId: 17459429
Journal-article: Physiology & behavior, vol. 91, 2007
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, April M Giacomelli, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Within-session decreases in instrumental responding to obtain food, consistent with habituation, have been reliably demonstrated in adults and children. This study tested the hypothesis that within-session decreases in instrumental responding for food are due to habituation rather than satiation. Thirty-eight 8-12-year-old children performed a computer-based operant task to earn points toward access to potato chips for 20 min, and for chocolate candies for the final 6 min of the session. Portion size of the food reinforcer (75 kcal vs 225 kcal) and food consumption (consumption/no consumption). There was no difference in the rate of response decrease between the two portion size conditions. Both the consumption and non-consumption groups showed response decelerations during the first 20 min, with responses in the consumption group decreasing at a faster rate. When the novel food was presented, participants in all conditions recovered responding. Although satiation may contribute to reductions in motivated responding for food when food is consumed, habituation provides a more complete explanation for the results observed in this study.
PubMedId: 17961817
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 50, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Jennifer L Temple, Brad J Neaderhiser, Robbert J Salis, Richard W Erbe, John J Leddy
Abstract: The authors measured food reinforcement, polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and dopamine transporter (DAT1) genes, and laboratory energy intake in 29 obese and 45 nonobese humans 18-40 years old. Food reinforcement was greater in obese than in nonobese individuals, especially in obese individuals with the TaqI A1 allele. Energy intake was greater for individuals high in food reinforcement and greatest in those high in food reinforcement with the TaqI A1 allele. No effect of the DAT1 genotype was observed. These data show that individual differences in food reinforcement may be important for obesity and that the DRD2 genotype may interact with food reinforcement to influence energy intake.
PubMedId: 17907820
Journal-article: Behavioral neuroscience, vol. 121, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, John J Leddy, Jennifer L Temple, Myles S Faith
Abstract: Eating represents a choice among many alternative behaviors. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of how food reinforcement and behavioral choice theory are related to eating and to show how this theoretical approach may help organize research on eating from molecular genetics through treatment and prevention of obesity. Special emphasis is placed on how food reinforcement and behavioral choice theory are relevant to understanding excess energy intake and obesity and how they provide a framework for examining factors that may influence eating and are outside of those that may regulate energy homeostasis. Methods to measure food reinforcement are reviewed, along with factors that influence the reinforcing value of eating. Contributions of neuroscience and genetics to the study of food reinforcement are illustrated by using the example of dopamine. Implications of food reinforcement for obesity and positive energy balance are explored, with suggestions for novel approaches to obesity treatment based on the synthesis of behavioral and pharmacological approaches to food reinforcement.
PubMedId: 17723034
Journal-article: Psychological bulletin, vol. 133, 2007
Authors: Leonard H Epstein, Kelly K Dearing, Jennifer L Temple, Meghan D Cavanaugh
Abstract: Pediatric obesity involves choices among healthy and less healthy alternatives, as well as choices whose consequences vary over time, such as engaging in unhealthy behaviors now at the expense of future health. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative reinforcing value of food and behavioral impulsivity under different experimental conditions in a sample of 50 families screened for participation in a pediatric obesity treatment program. Relative reinforcing value for food versus money was studied under conditions in which increased response requirements were placed on either access to food or money, and the amount of money, the alternative reinforcer, was varied. Impulsivity for small immediate versus larger delayed monetary rewards was studied under conditions in which the value of the immediate reward and the duration of the delay were varied. Results showed that response requirements affected the choice of food for both parents and children (p<0.001), and there was a significant correlation between the number of food reinforcers chosen by parents and children (r=0.57, p<0.001). The value of the immediate reward differentially influenced choice of the immediate reward for parents and children (p<0.05), with children (p<0.001) but not parents (p=0.36) more impulsive as value of the immediate reward increased. The length of the delay influenced both parent (p=0.004) and child (p<0.01) choice of the immediate reward. Parent and child impulsivity were not correlated (r=0.15, p=0.29). This study suggests that food reinforcement may be more similar between parents and children than behavioral impulsivity, though additional research using other measures of relative reinforcing value and impulsivity is warranted.
PubMedId: 18549991
Journal-article: Eating behaviors, vol. 9, 2007
Authors: J L Temple, B H Wrotniak, R A Paluch, J N Roemmich, L H Epstein
Abstract: To determine if the sex of the participating parent/child pair is a contributing factor in initial weight loss and maintenance within a family-based obesity treatment program. A 2-year family-based obesity treatment program targeting one overweight parent and one overweight child. One overweight parent (body mass index (BMI) > or = 25) and child (> or = 85th BMI percentile) from 164 families. Parameters of body weight, including height, weight, BMI, z-BMI, percent overweight (BOV) at baseline and at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up time points. Children within the opposite-sex dyads had greater weight loss (P < 0.01) at 6- and 12-month time points compared with children in the same-sex dyads. Parents within opposite-sex dyads had significantly greater weight loss at 24 months (P < 0.05) compared with those in the same-sex dyads. When individual dyads were examined, the change in child z-BMI after 6 months was greater for the mother-son dyad as compared to the mother-daughter and father-son (P < 0.05). For parent z-BMI, the mother-daughter dyad consistently exhibited the poorest results. At 6- and 12-month time points, parents in the mother-daughter dyad lost significantly less weight than parents in all other dyads (P < 0.05), and at 24 months, parents in the mother-daughter dyad lost less weight than parents in the opposite-sex dyads (P < 0.05). These data reveal that child-parent sex interactions can strongly influence the outcome of obesity treatment when both parent and child are the target for weight loss. The reasons that underlie this effect remain to be determined.
PubMedId: 16491111
Journal-article: International journal of obesity (2005), vol. 30, 2006
Authors: Jennifer L Temple, Kristine M Kent, April M Giacomelli, Rocco A Paluch, James N Roemmich, Leonard H Epstein
Abstract: Salivary responses habituate to repeated presentations of food cues, and these responses recover when new food stimuli are presented. Research suggests that within-session changes in motivated responding for food may also habituate, and motivated responding may, therefore, recover when new foods are presented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate similarities in the pattern of salivation and motivated responding for a cheeseburger stimulus in children, followed by either a novel stimulus (French fries) or another cheeseburger trial. The order of the task (salivation or motivation) was counterbalanced over days. Salivation and motivated responding for cheeseburger were reliably reduced over seven trials, and responses recovered after presentation of French fries on trial 8. Random regression models showed a significant relationship between the rate of change in motivated responding and salivation. These results provide additional support for similarities in processes that regulate salivation and motivated responding for food and strengthen support for the hypothesis that changes in motivated responding can be understood by habituation theory.
PubMedId: 16624446
Journal-article: Appetite, vol. 46, 2005
Presented by CUBS © 2022