UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
James N. Jarvis UB Profile
Pediatrics
Clinical Professor
Clinical and Translational Research Center
875 Ellicott Street
Room 8026
Buffalo NY 14203
716-878-7258
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Vincent M. Tutino, Kerry E. Poppenberg, Kaiyu Jiang, James N. Jarvis, Yijun Sun, Ashish Sonig, Adnan H. Siddiqui, Kenneth V. Snyder, Elad I. Levy, John Kolega, Hui Meng
PubMedId: 29342213
Journal-article: PLOS ONE, vol. 13, pp. e0191407, 2018
Authors: Lisha Zhu, Kaiyu Jiang, Karstin Webber, Laiping Wong, Tao Liu, Yanmin Chen, James N. Jarvis
Keywords: CD4+T cells Epigenetic regulation Functional elements JIA Neutrophils SNP LD blocks
Abstract: The transcriptomes of peripheral blood cells in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have distinct transcriptional aberrations that suggest impairment of transcriptional regulation. To gain a better understanding of this phenomenon, we studied known JIA genetic risk loci, the majority of which are located in non-coding regions, where transcription is regulated and coordinated on a genome-wide basis. We examined human neutrophils and CD4 primary T cells to identify genes and functional elements located within those risk loci. We analyzed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data, H3K27ac and H3K4me1 chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data, and previously published chromatin interaction analysis by paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) data to characterize the chromatin landscapes within the known JIA-associated risk loci. In both neutrophils and primary CD4+ T cells, the majority of the JIA-associated linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks contained H3K27ac and/or H3K4me1 marks. These LD blocks were also binding sites for a small group of transcription factors, particularly in neutrophils. Furthermore, these regions showed abundant intronic and intergenic transcription in neutrophils. In neutrophils, none of the genes that were differentially expressed between untreated patients with JIA and healthy children were located within the JIA-risk LD blocks. In CD4+ T cells, multiple genes, including HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB2, TRAF1, and IRF1 were associated with the long-distance interacting regions within the LD regions as determined from ChIA-PET data. These findings suggest that genetic risk contributes to the aberrant transcriptional control observed in JIA. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate the challenges of identifying the actual causal variants within complex genomic/chromatin landscapes.
PubMedId: 28288683
Journal-article: Arthritis Research & Therapy, vol. 19, 2017
Authors: Laiping Wong, Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, James N. Jarvis
Abstract: Deep whole genome sequencing (WGS) allows for the comprehensive study of genetic landscapes at finer resolution than array based methods. We conducted deep WGS on children with the polyarticular form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), using 2 independent cohorts to ascertain the sequencing fidelity. Genome wide SNP density analysis identified 18 SNP hotspots with comparison to the 1000 Genome Projects (1KGP) data. A subset of the genes adjacent to SNP hotspots showed statistically significant enrichment in immunological processes. Genes adjacent to indel hotspots were functionally related to G-protein coupled signaling pathways. Further analyses elucidated significantly more JIA SNPs with regulatory potential compared to 1KGP data. Furthermore, SNPs located within linkage disequibilium (LD) blocks containing previously identified JIA-associated SNPs demonstrated higher regulation potential compared to SNPs outside LD blocks. We also demonstrated enrichment of novel JIA variants in histone modification peaks and DNase hypersensitivity sites in B cells. This study greatly expands the number of genetic variants that may contribute to JIA and give us some clues into what may trigger this disease. To date, this study is the first deep WGS effort on children with JIA and provides useful genetic resources for research communities particularly in understanding JIA etiology.
PubMedId: 28572608
Journal-article: Scientific Reports, vol. 7, 2017
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Laiping Wong, Yanmin Chen, Xiaoyun Xing, Daofeng Li, Ting Wang, James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 29800761
Journal Article: Journal of reproductive immunology, vol. 128, 2017
Authors: Zihua Hu, Kaiyu Jiang, Mark Barton Frank, Yanmin Chen, James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 29773851
Journal Article: Scientific reports, vol. 8, 2017
Authors: Rie Karasawa, Mayumi Tamaki, Toshiko Sato, Megumi Tanaka, Makiko Nawa, Kazuo Yudoh, James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 29361142
Journal Article: Rheumatology (Oxford, England), vol. 57, 2017
Authors: Joseph M Kheir, Carla J Guthridge, Jonathon R Johnston, Lucas J Adams, Astrid Rasmussen, Timothy F Gross, Melissa E Munroe, Rebecka L Bourn, Kathy L Sivils, Joel M Guthridge, Michael H Weisman, Daniel J Wallace, Juan-Manuel Anaya, Adriana Rojas Villarraga, James N Jarvis, John B Harley, Judith A James
PubMedId: 29531773
Journal Article: Lupus science & medicine, vol. 5, 2017
Authors: Joyce S Hui-Yuen, Lisha Zhu, Lai Ping Wong, Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, Tao Liu, James N Jarvis
Keywords: Enhancers Genetics Lymphocytes Neutrophils Systemic lupus erythematosus
Abstract: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system, complex disease in which the environment interacts with inherited genes to produce broad phenotypes with inter-individual variability. Of 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shown to confer genetic risk for SLE in recent genome-wide association studies, 30 lie within noncoding regions of the human genome. We therefore sought to identify and describe the functional elements (aside from genes) located within these regions of interest. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing to identify epigenetic marks associated with enhancer function in adult neutrophils to determine whether enhancer-associated histone marks were enriched within the linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks encompassing the 46 SNPs of interest. We also interrogated available data in Roadmap Epigenomics for CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells to identify these same elements in lymphoid cells. All three cell types demonstrated enrichment of enhancer-associated histone marks compared with genomic background within LD blocks encoded by SLE-associated SNPs. In addition, within the promoter regions of these LD blocks, all three cell types demonstrated enrichment for transcription factor binding sites above genomic background. In CD19+ B cells, all but one of the LD blocks of interest were also enriched for enhancer-associated histone marks. Much of the genetic risk for SLE lies within or near genomic regions of disease-relevant cells that are enriched for epigenetic marks associated with enhancer function. Elucidating the specific roles of these noncoding elements within these cell-type-specific genomes will be crucial to our understanding of SLE pathogenesis.
PubMedId: 27906046
Journal-article: Arthritis research & therapy, vol. 18, 2016
Authors: Laiping Wong, Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, Teresa Hennon, Lucy Holmes, Carol A Wallace, James N Jarvis
Abstract: Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common chronic disease conditions affecting children in the USA. As with many rheumatic diseases, there is growing interest in using genomic technologies to develop biomarkers for either diagnosis or to guide treatment ("personalized medicine"). Here, we explore the use of gene expression patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a first step approach to developing such biomarkers. Although PBMC carry many theoretical advantages for translational research, we have found that sample heterogeneity makes RNASeq on PBMC unsuitable as a first-step method for screening biomarker candidates in JIA. RNASeq studies of homogeneous cell populations are more likely to be useful and informative.
PubMedId: 27385437
Journal-article: Scientific reports, vol. 6, 2016
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Laiping Wong, Ashley D Sawle, M Barton Frank, Yanmin Chen, Carol A Wallace, James N Jarvis
Keywords: Gene expression Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Microarray Pathogenesis Whole blood
Abstract: The Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (TREAT trial) was accompanied by a once-in-a-generation sample collection for translational research. In this paper, we report the results of whole blood gene expression analyses and genomic data-mining designed to cast light on the immunopathogenesis of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). TREAT samples and samples from an independent cohort were analyzed on Affymetrix microarrays and compared to healthy controls. Data from the independent cohort were used to validate the TREAT data. Pathways analysis was used to characterize gene expression profiles. Furthermore, we correlated differential gene expression with new information about functional regulatory elements within the genome to develop models of aberrant gene expression in JIA. There was a strong concordance in gene expression between TREAT samples and the independent cohort. In addition, rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive and RF-negative patients showed only small differences on whole blood expression profiles. Analysis of the combined samples showed 158 genes represented by 176 probes that showed differential expression between TREAT subjects at baseline and healthy controls. None of the differentially expressed genes were encoded within linkage disequilibrium blocks containing single nucleotide polymorphisms known to be associated with risk for JIA. Functional analysis of these genes showed functional associations with multiple processes associated with innate and adaptive immunity, and appeared to reflect overall suppression of STAT1-3/interferon response factor-mediated pathways. Despite their limitations, whole blood expression profiles clearly distinguish children with polyarticular JIA from healthy controls. Whole blood expression profiles identify several immunologic pathways of biologic relevance that will need to be pursued in homogeneous cell populations in order to clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis. ClinicalTrials.gov registry #NCT00443430 , originally registered 2 March 2007 and last updated 30 May 2013.
PubMedId: 27388672
Journal-article: Arthritis research & therapy, vol. 18, 2016
Authors: Supriya D Mahajan, Vincent M Tutino, Yonas Redae, Hui Meng, Adnan Siddiqui, Trent M Woodruff, James N Jarvis, Teresa Hennon, Stanley Schwartz, Richard J Quigg, Jessy J Alexander
Keywords: apoptosis blood-brain barrier complement endothelial cells neurodegeneration
Abstract: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction complicates central nervous system lupus, an important aspect of systemic lupus erythematosus. To gain insight into the underlying mechanism, vascular corrosion casts of brain were generated from the lupus mouse model, MRL/lpr mice and the MRL/MpJ congenic controls. Scanning electron microscopy of the casts showed loss of vascular endothelial cells in lupus mice compared with controls. Immunostaining revealed a significant increase in caspase 3 expression in the brain vascular endothelial cells, which suggests that apoptosis could be an important mechanism causing cell loss, and thereby loss of BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in lupus resulting in increased generation of circulating C5a, which caused the endothelial layer to become 'leaky'. In this study, we show that C5a and lupus serum induced apoptosis in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVECs), whereas selective C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1) antagonist reduced apoptosis in these cells, demonstrating C5a/C5aR1-dependence. Gene expression of initiator caspases, caspase 1 and caspase 8, and pro-apoptotic proteins death-associated protein kinase 1, Fas-associated protein (FADD), cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor 45 000 MW subunit A-like effector B (CIDEB) and BCL2-associated X protein were increased in HBMVECs treated with lupus serum or C5a, indicating that both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways could be critical mediators of brain endothelial cell apoptosis in this setting. Overall, our findings suggest that C5a/C5aR1 signalling induces apoptosis through activation of FADD, caspase 8/3 and CIDEB in brain endothelial cells in lupus. Further elucidation of the underlying apoptotic mechanisms mediating the reduced endothelial cell number is important in establishing the potential therapeutic effectiveness of C5aR1 inhibition that could prevent and/or reduce BBB alterations and preserve the physiological function of BBB in central nervous system lupus.
PubMedId: 27213693
Journal-article: Immunology, vol. 148, 2016
Authors: Junchen Gu, Michael Stevens, Xiaoyun Xing, Daofeng Li, Bo Zhang, Jacqueline E Payton, Eugene M Oltz, James N Jarvis, Kaiyu Jiang, Theodore Cicero, Joseph F Costello, Ting Wang
Keywords: DNA methylomes methylCRF methylation dynamics regulatory elements
Abstract: DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in many biological processes and diseases. Many studies have mapped DNA methylation changes associated with embryogenesis, cell differentiation, and cancer at a genome-wide scale. Our understanding of genome-wide DNA methylation changes in a developmental or disease-related context has been steadily growing. However, the investigation of which CpGs are variably methylated in different normal cell or tissue types is still limited. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of 54 single-CpG-resolution DNA methylomes of normal human cell types by integrating high-throughput sequencing-based methylation data. We found that the ratio of methylated to unmethylated CpGs is relatively constant regardless of cell type. However, which CpGs made up the unmethylated complement was cell-type specific. We categorized the 26,000,000 human autosomal CpGs based on their methylation levels across multiple cell types to identify variably methylated CpGs and found that 22.6% exhibited variable DNA methylation. These variably methylated CpGs formed 660,000 variably methylated regions (VMRs), encompassing 11% of the genome. By integrating a multitude of genomic data, we found that VMRs enrich for histone modifications indicative of enhancers, suggesting their role as regulatory elements marking cell type specificity. VMRs enriched for transcription factor binding sites in a tissue-dependent manner. Importantly, they enriched for GWAS variants, suggesting that VMRs could potentially be implicated in disease and complex traits. Taken together, our results highlight the link between CpG methylation variation, genetic variation, and disease risk for many human cell types.
PubMedId: 26888867
Journal-article: G3 (Bethesda, Md.), vol. 6, 2016
Authors: John M Chaney, Kaitlyn L Gamwell, Amanda N Baraldi, Rachelle R Ramsey, Christopher C Cushing, Alexandria J Mullins, Stephen R Gillaspy, James N Jarvis, Larry L Mullins
Keywords: caregiver demand child depressive symptoms illness uncertainty juvenile rheumatic diseases parent distress. parentchild adjustment
Abstract: Examine caregiver demand and general parent distress as mediators in the parent illness uncertainty-child depressive symptom association in youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases. Children and adolescents completed the Child Depression Inventory; caregivers completed the Parent Perceptions of Uncertainty Scale, the Care for My Child with Rheumatic Disease Scale, and the Brief Symptom Inventory. The pediatric rheumatologist provided ratings of clinical disease status. Analyses revealed significant direct associations between illness uncertainty and caregiver demand, and between caregiver demand and both parent distress and child depressive symptoms. Results also revealed significant parent uncertainty caregiver demand parent distress and parent uncertainty caregiver demand child depressive symptom indirect paths. Results highlight the role of illness appraisals in adjustment to juvenile rheumatic diseases, and provide preliminary evidence that parent appraisals of illness uncertainty impact parent distress and child depressive symptoms indirectly through increased perceptions of caregiver demand.
PubMedId: 26896507
Journal-article: Journal of pediatric psychology, vol. 41, 2015
Authors: Zihua Hu, Kaiyu Jiang, Mark Barton Frank, Yanmin Chen, James N Jarvis
Abstract: NIH projects such as ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics have revealed surprising complexity in the transcriptomes of mammalian cells. In this study, we explored transcriptional complexity in human neutrophils, cells generally regarded as nonspecific in their functions and responses. We studied distinct human disease phenotypes and found that, at the gene, gene isoform, and miRNA level, neutrophils exhibit considerable specificity in their transcriptomes. Thus, even cells whose responses are considered non-specific show tailoring of their transcriptional repertoire toward specific physiologic or pathologic contexts. We also found that miRNAs had a global impact on neutrophil transcriptome and are associated with innate immunity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). These findings have important implications for our understanding of the link between genes, non-coding transcripts and disease phenotypes.
PubMedId: 27271962
Journal-article: Scientific reports, vol. 6, 2015
Authors: Nan Du, Kaiyu Jiang, Ashley D. Sawle, Mark Barton Frank, Carol A. Wallace, Aidong Zhang, James N. Jarvis
Abstract: We have previously shown that childhood-onset rheumatic diseases show aberrant patterns of gene expression that reflect pathology-associated co-expression networks. In this study, we used novel computational approaches to examine how disease-associated networks are altered in one of the most common rheumatic diseases of childhood, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Using whole blood gene expression profiles derived from children in a pediatric rheumatology clinical trial, we used a network approach to understanding the impact of therapy and the underlying biology of response/non-response to therapy. We demonstrate that therapy for JIA is associated with extensive re-ordering of gene expression networks, even in children who respond inadequately to therapy. Furthermore, we observe distinct differences in the evolution of specific network properties when we compare children who have been treated successfully with those who have inadequate treatment response. Despite the inherent noisiness of whole blood gene expression data, our findings demonstrate how therapeutic response might be mapped and understood in pathologically informative cells in a broad range of human inflammatory diseases.
PubMedId: 26497493
Journal-article: Genome Medicine, vol. 7, 2015
Authors: Supriya D Mahajan, Neil U Parikh, Trent M Woodruff, James N Jarvis, Molly Lopez, Teresa Hennon, Patrick Cunningham, Richard J Quigg, Stanley A Schwartz, Jessy J Alexander
Keywords: anaphylatoxins blood-brain barrier endothelium neurodegeneration systemic lupus erythematosus
Abstract: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a crucial role in brain homeostasis, thereby maintaining the brain environment precise for optimal neuronal function. Its dysfunction is an intriguing complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder where neurological complications occur in 5-50% of cases and is associated with impaired BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in SLE and is an important part of the clinical profile. Our earlier studies demonstrated that C5a generated by complement activation caused the loss of brain endothelial layer integrity in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the translational potential of these studies to a human system. To assess this, we used a two dimensional in vitro BBB model constructed using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells and astroglial cells, which closely emulates the in vivo BBB allowing the assessment of BBB integrity. Increased permeability monitored by changes in transendothelial electrical resistance and cytoskeletal remodelling caused by actin fiber rearrangement were observed when the cells were exposed to lupus serum and C5a, similar to the observations in mice. In addition, our data show that C5a/C5aR1 signalling alters nuclear factor-B translocation into nucleus and regulates the expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-5 and zonula occludens 1 in this setting. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C5a regulates BBB integrity in a neuroinflammatory setting where it affects both endothelial and astroglial cells. In addition, we also demonstrate that our previous findings in a mouse model, were emulated in human cells in vitro, bringing the studies one step closer to understanding the translational potential of C5a/C5aR1 blockade as a promising therapeutic strategy in SLE and other neurodegenerative diseases.
PubMedId: 26059553
Journal-article: Immunology, vol. 146, 2015
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Xiaoyun Sun, Yanmin Chen, Yufeng Shen, James N Jarvis
Abstract: The transcriptional complexity of mammalian cells suggests that they have broad abilities to respond to specific environmental stimuli and physiologic contexts. These abilities were not apparent a priori from the structure of mammalian genomes, but have been identified through detailed transcriptome analyses. In this study, we examined the transcriptomes of cells of the innate immune system, human neutrophils, using RNA sequencing (RNAseq). We sequenced poly-A RNA from nine individual samples corresponding to specific phenotypes: three children with active, untreated juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)(AD), three children with the same disease whose disease was inactive on medication (CRM), and three children with cystic fibrosis (CF). We demonstrate that transcriptomes of neutrophils, typically considered non-specific in their responses and functions, display considerable specificity in their transcriptional repertoires dependent on the pathologic context, and included genes, gene isoforms, and long non-coding RNA transcripts. Furthermore, despite the small sample numbers, these findings demonstrate the potential of RNAseq approaches to biomarker development in rheumatic diseases. These data demonstrate the capacity of cells previously considered non-specific in function to adapt their transcriptomes to specific biologic contexts. These data also provide insight into previously unrecognized pathological pathways and show considerable promise for elucidating disease and disease-state specific regulatory networks.
PubMedId: 26310571
Journal-article: BMC medical genomics, vol. 8, 2015
Authors: Rie Karasawa, James N Jarvis
Abstract: Juvenile dermatomyositis is a complex illness characterized by vascular/perivascular inflammation, primarily in the skin and muscles. In this review, we discuss how proteomic and genomic technologies have expanded our understanding of the immune pathogenesis of this disease. We will also discuss further directions that the field may take to use existing and developing technologies to further our understanding of this often-perplexing disease.
PubMedId: 26213193
Journal-article: Nihon Rinsho Men'eki Gakkai kaishi = Japanese journal of clinical immunology, vol. 38, 2015
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Lisha Zhu, Michael J Buck, Yanmin Chen, Bradley Carrier, Tao Liu, James N Jarvis
Abstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is considered a complex disease in which the environment interacts with inherited genes to produce a phenotype that shows broad interindividual variability. Twenty-four regions of genetic risk for JIA were identified in a recent genome-wide association study (GWAS); however, as is typical of the results of GWAS, most of the regions of genetic risk (22 of 24) were in noncoding regions of the genome. This study was undertaken to identify functional elements (other than genes) that might be located within the regions of genetic risk. We used paired-end RNA sequencing to identify noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) located within 5 kb of disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In addition, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by sequencing to identify epigenetic marks associated with enhancer function (H3K4me1 and H3K27ac) in human neutrophils to determine whether enhancer-associated histone marks were enriched in the linkage disequilibrium blocks that encompassed the 22 SNPs identified in the GWAS. In human neutrophils, we identified H3K4me1 and/or H3K27ac marks in 15 of the 22 regions previously identified as risk loci for JIA. In CD4+ T cells, 18 regions had H3K4me1 and/or H3K27ac marks. In addition, we identified ncRNA transcripts at the rs4705862 and rs6894249 loci in human neutrophils. Much of the genetic risk for JIA lies within or adjacent to regions of neutrophil and CD4+ T cell genomes that carry epigenetic marks associated with enhancer function and/or ncRNA transcripts. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that JIA is fundamentally a disorder of gene regulation that includes both the innate and the adaptive immune system. Elucidating the specific roles of these noncoding elements within leukocyte genomes will be critical to our understanding of JIA pathogenesis.
PubMedId: 25833190
Journal-article: Arthritis & rheumatology (Hoboken, N.J.), vol. 67, 2014
Authors: K. Jiang, T. Liu, M. J. Buck, Y. Chen, B. Carrier, J. Jarvis
Journal-article: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 73, pp. 134-135, 2014
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Kaiyu Jiang, Tao Liu, Michael Buck, Bradley Carrier, Yanmin Chen
Journal-article: Arthritis & Rheumatology, vol. 66, pp. S227-S227, 2014
Authors: K. Jiang, Z. Hu, Y. Chen, J. Jarvis
Journal-article: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 73, pp. 347-347, 2014
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Zihua Hu, Yanmin Chen, James N. Jarvis
Journal-article: Arthritis & Rheumatology, vol. 66, pp. S230-S230, 2014
Authors: J. Yao, K. Jiang, M. B. Frank, Y. Chen, C. A. Wallace, Y. Sun, J. Jarvis
Journal-article: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 73, pp. 133-133, 2014
Authors: Margaret S Bonner, Rachelle R Ramsey, Jamie L Ryan, David A Fedele, Larry L Mullins, Janelle L Wagner, James N Jarvis, John M Chaney
Keywords: Depressive symptoms illness intrusiveness juvenile rheumatic diseases parentchild interaction
Abstract: Studies demonstrate a link between parental distress, youth illness appraisals, and depression symptoms in youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases. However, the exclusive use of broadband (i.e. general) measures of parental distress in these studies has resulted in conceptual and clinical imprecision regarding the parent-child adjustment process. Our aim was to reanalyze previously published data (i.e. Wagner et al., 2003) using a depression-specific scale derived from the general adult distress measure in the original study. Parents completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), youth completed the Child Depression Inventory (CDI), and the Illness Intrusiveness Scale (IIS-C). Thirteen Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) depression-specific items from the BSI comprised the parent measure of Depressive Symptoms Scale (DS). Consistent with Wagner et al. (2003), adult DS scores were associated with youth CDI scores. However, youth illness appraisals had unique effects on the parent-child depression relation. Elevated youth perceptions of illness intrusiveness amplified the negative effect of parent depressive symptoms on youth depressive symptoms; decreased illness intrusiveness buffered the negative effect of parent depression. The empirical and clinical implications of assessing parent and youth adjustment in a domain-specific manner are discussed.
PubMedId: 23939726
Journal-article: Journal of child health care : for professionals working with children in the hospital and community, vol. 19, 2013
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Ashley D Sawle, M Barton Frank, Yanmin Chen, Carol A Wallace, James N Jarvis
Abstract: To determine whether gene expression profiles identified in peripheral whole blood samples could be used to determine therapeutic outcome in a cohort of children with newly diagnosed polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Whole blood samples from the Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy (TREAT) in JIA patients were analyzed on Illumina microarrays, and differential gene expression was compared to expression in healthy controls. Microarray results were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in an independent cohort of samples. Pathway analysis software was used to characterize gene expression profiles. Support vector machines were used to develop predictive models for different patient classes. Differential gene expression profiles for rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive and RF-negative patients were remarkably similar. Pathway analysis revealed a broad range of affected pathways, consistent with current mechanistic theories. Modeling showed that the prognosis at 6 months was strongly linked to gene expression at presentation, irrespective of treatment. Gene expression is linked to therapeutic outcome, and gene expression in the peripheral blood may be a suitable target for a prognostic test.
PubMedId: 24782192
Journal-article: Arthritis & rheumatology (Hoboken, N.J.), vol. 66, 2013
Authors: Jamie L. Ryan, Larry L. Mullins, Rachelle R. Ramsey, Margaret S. Bonner, James N. Jarvis, Stephen R. Gillaspy, John M. Chaney
Abstract: Parents of youth with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRD) often take on illness management responsibilities that can become burdensome, potentially resulting in poor parent adjustment outcomes. However, not all caregivers will experience increased distress as a result of variability in stress appraisals. The current study examined the role of parent illness attitudes in the relation between perceived caregiver demand and parental distress. Youth (N = 70) ages 7-18 years diagnosed with a JRD and their parents were recruited from a pediatric rheumatology clinic. Parents completed measures of caregiver demand, parental distress, and illness attitudes. Hierarchical regression revealed a relationship between caregiver demand and parental distress. A significant relationship was also found between caregiver demand and parent illness attitudes, as well as parent illness attitudes and parental distress. Thus, parent illness attitudes mediated the relationship between caregiver demand and parental distress. Techniques aimed at altering negative illness attitudes may help parents cope with their caregiving responsibilities.
PubMedId: 23613109
Journal-article: Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, vol. 20, pp. 351-360, 2013
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Mark Frank, Yanmin Chen, Jeanette Osban, James N Jarvis
Abstract: The attainment of remission has become an important end point for clinical trials in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), although we do not yet have a full understanding of what remission is at the cell and molecular level. Two independent cohorts of patients with JIA and healthy child controls were studied. RNA was prepared separately from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and granulocytes to identify differentially expressed genes using whole genome microarrays. Expression profiling results for selected genes were confirmed by quantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that remission in JIA induced by either methotrexate (MTX) or MTX plus a TNF inhibitor (etanercept, Et) (MTX + Et) is characterized by numerous differences in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in granulocytes compared with healthy control children; that is, remission is not a restoration of immunologic normalcy. Network analysis of the differentially expressed genes demonstrated that the steroid hormone receptor superfamily member hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4) is a hub in several of the gene networks that distinguished children with arthritis from controls. Confocal microscopy revealed that HNF4a is present in both T lymphocytes and granulocytes, suggesting a previously unsuspected role for this transcription factor in regulating leukocyte function and therapeutic response in JIA. These findings provide a framework from which to understand therapeutic response in JIA and, furthermore, may be used to develop strategies to increase the frequency with which remission is achieved in adult forms of rheumatoid arthritis.
PubMedId: 24000795
Journal-article: Arthritis Research & Therapy, vol. 15, pp. R100, 2013
Authors: David A Fedele, Jamie L Ryan, Rachelle R Ramsey, DeMond M Grant, Margaret S Bonner, S Paul Stermer, Larry L Mullins, James N Jarvis, John M Chaney
Abstract: To examine the factor structure and convergent validity of the Illness Intrusiveness Scale--Parent Version in mother and fathers of children and adolescents ages 7 to 18 (M = 13.56 years, SD = 2.67) diagnosed with a juvenile rheumatic disease. Parents of 122 children and adolescents (82 girls, 40 boys) completed the Illness Intrusiveness Scale-Parent Version, and both parents and children and adolescents completed measures of functional disability, general distress, and illness uncertainty. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the Illness Intrusiveness Scale--Parent Version to identify the factor structure. The factors were then compared with parent- and child-report measures of functional disability, general distress, and uncertainty. Finally, analyses were conducted to determine whether the magnitude of the correlations was significantly different between factors for parents and children and adolescents. The Illness Intrusiveness Scale--Parent Version was found to have a two-factor structure. The Relationships/Personal Development factor contained items related to self-fulfillment and interactions with others, and the Instrumental factor contained items related to health and work. These factors were found to have good internal consistency and were significantly correlated with measures of parent-reported functional disability and parent- and youth-reported distress and uncertainty. The magnitude of these correlations was also found to differ depending on informant and outcome measure. The Illness Intrusiveness Scale--Parent Version appears to be a valid measure for use in parents of children with juvenile rheumatic disease.
PubMedId: 22369119
Journal-article: Rehabilitation psychology, vol. 57, 2012
Authors: David A. Fedele, Jamie L. Ryan, Rachelle R. Ramsey, DeMond M. Grant, Margaret S. Bonner, S. Paul Stermer, Larry L. Mullins, James N. Jarvis, John M. Chaney
Dataset: PsycTESTS Dataset, 2012
Authors: Rachelle R. Ramsey, Jamie L. Ryan, Margaret S. Bonner, David A. Fedele, Larry L. Mullins, James N. Jarvis, John M. Chaney
Journal-article: Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, vol. 25, pp. 285-296, 2012
Authors: Igor M Dozmorov, James Jarvis, Ricardo Saban, Doris M Benbrook, Edward Wakeland, Ivona Aksentijevich, John Ryan, Nicholas Chiorazzi, Joel M Guthridge, Elizabeth Drewe, Patrick J Tighe, Michael Centola, Ivan Lefkovits
Abstract: In this work we apply the Internal Standard-based analytical approach that we described in an earlier communication and here we demonstrate experimental results on functional associations among the hypervariably-expressed genes (HVE-genes). Our working assumption was that those genetic components, which initiate the disease, involve HVE-genes for which the level of expression is undistinguishable among healthy individuals and individuals with pathology. We show that analysis of the functional associations of the HVE-genes is indeed suitable to revealing disease-specific differences. We show also that another possible exploit of HVE-genes for characterization of pathological alterations is by using multivariate classification methods. This in turn offers important clues on naturally occurring dynamic processes in the organism and is further used for dynamic discrimination of groups of compared samples. We conclude that our approach can uncover principally new collective differences that cannot be discerned by individual gene analysis.
PubMedId: 21715372
Journal-article: Nucleic acids research, vol. 39, 2011
Authors: David A Fedele, Rachelle R Ramsey, Jamie L Ryan, Margaret S Bonner, Larry L Mullins, James N Jarvis, John M Chaney
Abstract: : This study sought to examine the differential effect of youth age on the association between parental uncertainty and both parent distress and youth depressive symptoms within the context of juvenile rheumatic disease. : The sample comprised 51 youth aged 9 to 17 years diagnosed with a juvenile rheumatic disease and their parents. Youth completed a measure of depressive symptoms (i.e., Children's Depression Inventory); parents completed measures of illness uncertainty (i.e., Parental Perceptions of Uncertainty Scale) and parental distress (i.e., Brief Symptom Inventory). : Parental uncertainty demonstrated a significant main effect on both parent distress and youth depressive symptoms. However, these main effects were qualified by significant parental uncertainty youth age interactions. Parental uncertainty was significantly related to parent distress for both younger and older youth but was only significantly related to youth depressive symptoms in the sample of older youth. : Parental uncertainty due to illness seems to be more predictive of both parent and youth distress with increasing youth age. These findings indicate that the impact of parental illness uncertainty on adjustment outcomes is pronounced as children transition into developmental periods of increasing autonomy and independence.
PubMedId: 21317801
Journal-article: Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP, vol. 32, 2011
Authors: Nikki N Kim, Peter A Lio, Gabrielle A Morgan, James N Jarvis, Lauren M Pachman
PubMedId: 21422326
Case Reports: Archives of dermatology, vol. 147, 2011
Authors: Jamie L Ryan, Rachelle R Ramsey, David A Fedele, Larry L Mullins, John M Chaney, James N Jarvis
Abstract: To examine the longitudinal relationships between parent and child distress in a sample of children with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRDs). Cross-lagged panel correlation analysis tested the temporal precedence of parent distress versus child distress over a 1-year period. Thirty-seven children (ages 9-17 years; 22 girls) diagnosed with JRD and their parents completed self-report measures on 2 occasions (assessment interval M = 12 months). Child Depression Inventory and Brief Symptom Inventory. Significant cross-sectional parent-child distress associations were observed at both time points. Moreover, Time 1 parent distress predicted child distress at Time 2 after child-reported functional ability was controlled; Time 1 child distress was unrelated to Time 2 parent distress. Cross-lagged panel correlations demonstrated the temporal precedence of parent distress relative to child distress in the parent-child distress relationship. These preliminary findings underscore the importance of parent distress in parent-child transactional adjustment, and suggest a predominant role for parent distress in children's adjustment to JRDs.
PubMedId: 20804272
Journal-article: Rehabilitation psychology, vol. 55, 2010
Authors: James N Jarvis, Mark Barton Frank
Abstract: Studies in model organisms and humans have begun to reveal the complexity of the transcriptome. In addition to serving as passive templates from which genes are translated, RNA molecules are active, functional elements of the cell whose products can detect, interact with, and modify other transcripts. Gene expression profiling is the method most commonly used thus far to enrich our understanding of the molecular basis of rheumatoid arthritis in adults and juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children. The feasibility of this approach for patient classification (for example, active versus inactive disease, disease subsets) and improving prognosis (for example, response to therapy) has been demonstrated over the past 7 years. Mechanistic understanding of disease-related differences in gene expression must be interpreted in the context of interactions with transcriptional regulatory molecules and epigenetic alterations of the genome. Ongoing work regarding such functional complexities in the human genome will likely bring both insight and surprise to our understanding of rheumatoid arthritis.
PubMedId: 20670388
Journal-article: Genome medicine, vol. 2, 2010
Authors: K. Jiang, L.C. Krous, N. Knowlton, Y. Chen, M.B. Frank, C. Cadwell, M. Centola, J.N. Jarvis
Abstract: Control of inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface is a critical element in mammalian pregnancy. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that Stat3 may be a placental mediator involved in maintaining immunologic homeostasis at the maternal-fetal interface. The aim of the current study is to further elucidate the role of Stat3 in response to inflammation. As ablation of Stat3 in mice results in embryonic lethality, we evaluated the role of Stat3 in vitro using an siRNA approach. Trophoblast-like JEG-3 cells were transfected with an siRNA construct specific to Stat3. Experimental and control cells were exposed to conditioned medium from PHA-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and incubated for 45 min. Cells were then collected and RNA isolated for transcriptional profiling using human Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 GeneChips. Differences in gene expression between control and Stat3-ablated cells were evaluated using conventional statistical methods. Fifty-two genes were detected as up-regulated in conditioned medium in both mock transfected and in Stat3 siRNA transfected JEG-3 cells. Two genes (EPAS1 and RASGEF1B) were up-regulated only in cells transfected with negative control siRNA, while 36 genes were up-regulated only in cells transfected with Stat3 siRNA. Sixty genes were differentially expressed between Stat3 siRNA transfected cells relative to mock transfected cells both in basal and conditioned medium. These included 31 genes up-regulated with Stat3 siRNA transfected cells and 29 genes down-regulated with Stat3 siRNA. Eleven genes were differentially expressed only in basal medium. Seven of these were up-regulated in the presence of Stat3 siRNA and four were down-regulated. Nine genes were differentially expressed only in conditioned medium. Six of these were up-regulated and three down-regulated in the presence of Stat3 siRNA. Off-target effects were excluded in a second set of experiments in which Stat3 mRNA was targeted at a different site and quantitative real-time PCR performed on selected genes derived from the microarray analysis. While some of the genes that showed differential expression between Stat3-ablated cells and mock transfected controls were genes typically associated with immune response (e.g., CCR7 and IRAK1), in silico modeling of the microarray data also revealed complex networks of signaling molecules and molecules associated with cellular metabolism previously seen in transcription factor ablation in model organisms. We conclude thus: Stat3 controls a specific gene set in trophoblast-like JEG-3 cells. While some differentially expressed genes and in silico models of their functions are consistent with the hypothesis that Stat3 plays a role in regulating inflammation, Stat3-mediated response to inflammation appears to also involve complex homeostatic adaptations of a non-immunologic nature.
PubMedId: 19616846
Journal-article: Placenta, vol. 30, pp. 806-815, 2009
Authors: James N Jarvis, Kaiyu Jiang, Mark Barton Frank, Nicholas Knowlton, Amita Aggarwal, Carol A Wallace, Ryan McKee, Brad Chaser, Catherine Tung, Laura B Smith, Julie L McGhee, Yanmin Chen, Jeanette Osban, Kathleen M O'Neil, Michael Centola
Abstract: We have previously reported a defect in neutrophil activation in children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The current study was undertaken to determine whether gene expression abnormalities persist in JIA in remission and to use systems biology analysis to elucidate pathologic pathways in polyarticular JIA. We performed gene expression profiling on neutrophils from children with polyarticular JIA. Children were grouped according to disease status. We studied 14 children with active disease who were taking medication, 8 children with clinical remission of disease who were taking medication (CRM status), and 6 children with clinical remission of disease who were not taking medication (CR status). We also studied 13 healthy children whose age ranges overlapped those of the patients. Neutrophil abnormalities persisted in children with polyarticular JIA even after disease remission was achieved. Children with active disease and those with CRM status showed no differences in expression of specific genes, although they could be separated on cluster analysis. A comparison of children with CR status and healthy control children revealed networks of pro- and antiinflammatory genes that suggested that remission is a state of homeostasis and balance rather than a return to normal immune function. Furthermore, gene overexpression in patients with CR status supports the hypothesis that neutrophils play a role in regulating adaptive immunity in this disease. Neutrophil gene profiling in polyarticular JIA suggests important roles for neutrophils in disease pathogenesis. These findings suggest the presence of complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity, that are not easily modeled in conventional, linear, reductionist systems.
PubMedId: 19404961
Journal-article: Arthritis and rheumatism, vol. 60, 2009
Authors: Nicholas Knowlton, Kaiyu Jiang, Mark Barton Frank, Amita Aggarwal, Carol Wallace, Ryan McKee, Brad Chaser, Catherine Tung, Laura Smith, Yanmin Chen, Jeanette Osban, Kathleen O'Neil, Michael Centola, Julie L McGhee, James N Jarvis
Abstract: The development of biomarkers to predict response to therapy in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an important issue in pediatric rheumatology. A critical step in this process is determining whether there is biologic meaning to clinically derived terms such as "active disease" and "remission." The aim of this study was to use a systems biology approach to address this question. We performed gene transcriptional profiling on children who fulfilled the criteria for specific disease states as defined by the consensus criteria developed by Wallace and colleagues. The study group comprised children with active disease (n = 14), children with clinical remission on medication (CRM; n = 9), children with clinical remission off medication (CR; n = 6), and healthy control children (n = 13). Transcriptional profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Hierarchical cluster analysis and predictive modeling demonstrated that the clinically derived criteria represent biologically distinct states. Minimal differences were seen between children with active disease and those with disease in CRM. Thus, underlying immune/inflammatory abnormalities persist despite a response to therapy. The PBMC transcriptional profiles of children whose disease was in remission did not return to normal but revealed networks of proinflammatory and antiinflammatory genes, suggesting that remission is a state of homeostasis, not a return to a normal state. Gene transcriptional profiling of PBMCs revealed that clinically derived criteria for JIA disease states reflect underlying biology. We also demonstrated that neither CRM nor CR status results in resolution of the underlying inflammatory process, but that these conditions are more likely to be states of balanced homeostasis between proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mechanisms.
PubMedId: 19248118
Journal-article: Arthritis and rheumatism, vol. 60, 2009
Authors: Nicole R. Andrews, John M. Chaney, Larry L. Mullins, Janelle L. Wagner, Kevin A. Hommel, James N. Jarvis
Journal-article: Rehabilitation Psychology, vol. 54, pp. 45-50, 2009
Authors: Nicole R Andrews, John M Chaney, Larry L Mullins, Janelle L Wagner, Kevin A Hommel, James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 19618702
Journal Article: Rehabilitation psychology, vol. 54, 2009
Authors: Mark Barton Frank, Shirley Wang, Amita Aggarwal, Nicholas Knowlton, Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, Ryan McKee, Brad Chaser, Timothy McGhee, Jeanette Osban, James N Jarvis
Abstract: While standard reductionist approaches have provided some insights into specific gene polymorphisms and molecular pathways involved in disease pathogenesis, our understanding of complex traits such as atherosclerosis or type 2 diabetes remains incomplete. Gene expression profiling provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand complex human diseases by providing a global view of the multiple interactions across the genome that are likely to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Thus, the goal of gene expression profiling is not to generate lists of differentially expressed genes, but to identify the physiologic or pathogenic processes and structures represented in the expression profile. RNA was separately extracted from peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear leukocytes, labeled, and hybridized to genome level microarrays to generate expression profiles of children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis relative to childhood controls. Statistically significantly differentially expressed genes were identified from samples of each disease relative to controls. Functional network analysis identified interactions between products of these differentially expressed genes. In silico models of both diseases demonstrated similar features with properties of scale-free networks previously described in physiologic systems. These networks were observable in both cells of the innate immune system (neutrophils) and cells of the adaptive immune system (peripheral blood mononuclear cells). Genome-level transcriptional profiling from childhood onset rheumatic diseases suggested complex interactions in two arms of the immune system in both diseases. The disease associated networks showed scale-free network patterns similar to those reported in normal physiology. We postulate that these features have important implications for therapy as such networks are relatively resistant to perturbation.
PubMedId: 19236715
Journal-article: BMC medical genomics, vol. 2, 2008
Authors: James N Jarvis
Abstract: One of the least-appreciated advances in pediatric rheumatology over the past 25 years has been the delineation of the many ways in which children with rheumatic disease differ from adults with the same illnesses. Furthermore, we are now learning that paradigms that are useful in evaluating adults with musculoskeletal complaints have limited utility in children. Nowhere is that more true than in the use of commonly used laboratory tests, particularly antinuclear antibody (ANA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) assays. This short review will provide the practitioner with the evidence base that supports a more limited use of ANA and RF testing in children.
PubMedId: 19014701
Journal-article: Pediatric rheumatology online journal, vol. 6, 2008
Authors: E. J. Cornish, B. J. Hurtgen, K. McInnerney, N. L. Burritt, R. M. Taylor, J. N. Jarvis, S. Y. Wang, J. B. Burritt
Journal-article: The Journal of Immunology, vol. 180, pp. 6854-6867, 2008
Authors: E Jean Cornish, Brady J Hurtgen, Kate McInnerney, Nancy L Burritt, Ross M Taylor, James N Jarvis, Shirley Y Wang, James B Burritt
PubMedId: 18453606
Journal Article: Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950), vol. 180, 2008
Authors: J. N. JARVIS, M. M. DIEBOLD, M. K. CHADWELL, M. IOBIDZE, H. T. MOORE
Journal-article: Clinical & Experimental Immunology, vol. 100, pp. 514-518, 2008
Authors: James Jarvis, Shawn Garbedian, Ganesh Swamy
Journal-article: Spine, vol. 33, pp. 1074-1078, 2008
Authors: Nicole R Andrews, John M Chaney, Larry L Mullins, Janelle L Wagner, Kevin A Hommel, James N Jarvis
Abstract: To investigate cognitive appraisal-adjustment relationships in Native American (NA) and Caucasian parents of children diagnosed with juvenile rheumatic diseases. NA (n = 16) and Caucasian (n = 24) parents completed measures of disease status, illness intrusiveness, and adjustment; the rheumatologist provided estimates of disease severity. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed a moderating effect for racial group membership on the illness intrusiveness-parent adjustment relationship. Specifically, parent-perceived illness intrusiveness was more closely related to poorer adjustment among NA parents relative to Caucasian parents. Post hoc tests indicated that illness intrusiveness was significantly associated with poorer adjustment in NA parents, but was unrelated to parent adjustment in the Caucasian sample. Results highlight the importance of examining racial group differences in cognitive appraisal-adjustment outcome relationships. Results are discussed with respect to the need for incorporating cultural issues into pediatric chronic illness research and treatment.
PubMedId: 17634185
Journal-article: Journal of pediatric psychology, vol. 32, 2007
Authors: James N Jarvis, Kaiyu Jiang, Howard R Petty, Michael Centola
Abstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has long been assumed to be an autoimmune disease, triggered by aberrant recognition of "self" antigens by T-cells. However, systems biology approaches to this family of diseases have suggested complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity that underlie JIA. In particular, new data suggest an important role for neutrophils in JIA pathogenesis. In this short review, we will discuss the new data that support a role for neutrophils in JIA, discuss regulatory functions that link neutrophils to adaptive immune responses, and discuss future areas of investigation. Above all else, we invite the reader to re-consider the use of the term "autoimmunity" as applied to the family of illnesses we collectively call JIA.
PubMedId: 17567896
Journal-article: Pediatric rheumatology online journal, vol. 5, 2007
Authors: K. Jiang, Y. Chen, J.N. Jarvis
Abstract: Infection of the maternal vaginal tract is one of the single most important antecedents of premature labor. We have hypothesized that the abundant local synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines that occurs during infection may disrupt the delicate "immunological cross-talk" that must occur between maternal and fetal tissues in order to carry pregnancy to term. These experiments were undertaken as part of a larger study directed at testing that hypothesis. We prepared primary cultures of human trophoblasts from term placentas. Cell cultures were stimulated with conditioned medium from resting, PHA or LPS-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Medium with LPS or PHA at the same concentration as that used to stimulate the PBMC was used as an additional control. Lysates were subjected to western blotting for activated forms of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), Stat1, and Stat3. Western blotting showed phosphorylation of the Jun kinase (JNK), p38, and Erk1/Erk2 MAPK in trophoblasts incubated with conditioned medium from LPS or PHA-activated PBMC but not from medium from resting PBMC, or with PHA or LPS alone. Phosphorylation could be detected as early as 5 min and was still observable by 10 min, the latest time point tested. Similarly, Stat1 and Stat3 phosphorylation was observed within 10 min of exposure to conditioned medium and was still observable 10 min after exposure. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated nuclear translocation of both Stat1 and Stat3 after stimulation of trophoblasts with medium from activated PBMC. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that immunologic balance at the maternal-fetal interface is maintained by ongoing "cross-talk" between the fetus (and fetally-derived tissues) and the maternal immune system. Infection of the maternal vaginal tract may disrupt this delicate immunologic balance, initiating inflammatory events that ultimately result in preterm labor.
PubMedId: 16904741
Journal-article: Placenta, vol. 28, pp. 538-542, 2007
Authors: Janelle Wagner, John Chaney, Kevin Hommel, Nicole Andrews, James Jarvis
Journal-article: Children's Health Care, vol. 36, pp. 45-62, 2007
Authors: P Szodoray, P Alex, C M Chappell-Woodward, T M Madland, N Knowlton, I Dozmorov, M Zeher, J N Jarvis, B Nakken, J G Brun, M Centola
Abstract: Serum cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) by initiating and perpetuating various cellular and humoral autoimmune processes. The aim of this study was to describe a broad spectrum of T- and B-cell cytokines, growth factors and chemokines in patients with PsA and healthy individuals. A novel protein array system, denoted as multiplex cytokine assay was utilized to measure simultaneously the levels of 23 circulating cytokines of patients with PsA and healthy individuals. Additionally, correlational clustering and discriminant function analysis (DFA), two multivariate, supervised analysis methods were employed to identify a subset of biomarkers in order to describe potential functional inter-relationships among these pathological cytokines and identify biomarkers with prognostic and diagnostic utility. Univariate analysis demonstrated that serum levels of a complex set of immune and inflammatory modulating cytokines are significantly up-regulated in patients with PsA relative to unaffected controls including interleukin (IL)-10, IL-13, interferen (IFN)-alpha, epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor [CCL3 macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha], CCL4 (MIP-1beta) and CCL11 (Eotaxin), while granulocyte-colony stimulating factor was significantly reduced in PsA patients. Correlational clustering was able to discriminate among, and hence subclassify, patients with varying levels of disease activity, which may prove useful in guiding therapy in these apparently phenotypically distinct disease subsets. DFA identified EGF, IFN-alpha, VEGF, CCL3 (MIP-1alpha) and IL-12p40 as analytes with the strongest discriminatory power among various PsA patients and controls. Our findings suggest that these factors modulate PsA pathology and the articular involvement in a synergistic manner. Identifying factors could be used in the development of clinical diagnostic tests, which are valuable to guide evidence-based diagnosis and disease management of PsA.
PubMedId: 16936328
Journal-article: Rheumatology (Oxford, England), vol. 46, 2006
Authors: Shelley Lawrence, Yuhong Tang, M Barton Frank, Igor Dozmorov, Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, Craig Cadwell, Sean Turner, Michael Centola, James N Jarvis
Abstract: Neonatal monocytes display immaturity of numerous functions compared with adult cells. Gene expression arrays provide a promising tool for elucidating mechanisms underlying neonatal immune function. We used a well-established microarray to analyze differences between LPS-stimulated human cord blood and adult monocytes to create dynamic models for interactions to elucidate observed deficiencies in neonatal immune responses. We identified 168 genes that were differentially expressed between adult and cord monocytes after 45 min incubation with LPS. Of these genes, 95% (159 of 167) were over-expressed in adult relative to cord monocytes. Differentially expressed genes could be sorted into nine groups according to their kinetics of activation. Functional modelling suggested differences between adult and cord blood in the regulation of apoptosis, a finding confirmed using annexin binding assays. We conclude that kinetic studies of gene expression reveal potentially important differences in gene expression dynamics that may provide insight into neonatal innate immunity.
PubMedId: 17306030
Journal-article: Journal of inflammation (London, England), vol. 4, 2006
Authors: Raphaela Goldbach-Mansky, Natalie J Dailey, Scott W Canna, Ana Gelabert, Janet Jones, Benjamin I Rubin, H Jeffrey Kim, Carmen Brewer, Christopher Zalewski, Edythe Wiggs, Suvimol Hill, Maria L Turner, Barbara I Karp, Ivona Aksentijevich, Frank Pucino, Scott R Penzak, Margje H Haverkamp, Leonard Stein, Barbara S Adams, Terry L Moore, Robert C Fuhlbrigge, Bracha Shaham, James N Jarvis, Kathleen O'Neil, Richard K Vehe, Laurie O Beitz, Gregory Gardner, William P Hannan, Robert W Warren, William Horn, Joe L Cole, Scott M Paul, Philip N Hawkins, Tuyet Hang Pham, Christopher Snyder, Robert A Wesley, Steven C Hoffmann, Steven M Holland, John A Butman, Daniel L Kastner
Abstract: Neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease is characterized by fever, urticarial rash, aseptic meningitis, deforming arthropathy, hearing loss, and mental retardation. Many patients have mutations in the cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome 1 (CIAS1) gene, encoding cryopyrin, a protein that regulates inflammation. We selected 18 patients with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (12 with identifiable CIAS1 mutations) to receive anakinra, an interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (1 to 2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day subcutaneously). In 11 patients, anakinra was withdrawn at three months until a flare occurred. The primary end points included changes in scores in a daily diary of symptoms, serum levels of amyloid A and C-reactive protein, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate from baseline to month 3 and from month 3 until a disease flare. All 18 patients had a rapid response to anakinra, with disappearance of rash. Diary scores improved (P<0.001) and serum amyloid A (from a median of 174 mg to 8 mg per liter), C-reactive protein (from a median of 5.29 mg to 0.34 mg per deciliter), and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate decreased at month 3 (all P<0.001), and remained low at month 6. Magnetic resonance imaging showed improvement in cochlear and leptomeningeal lesions as compared with baseline. Withdrawal of anakinra uniformly resulted in relapse within days; retreatment led to rapid improvement. There were no drug-related serious adverse events. Daily injections of anakinra markedly improved clinical and laboratory manifestations in patients with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease, with or without CIAS1 mutations. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00069329 [ClinicalTrials.gov].).
PubMedId: 16899778
Journal-article: The New England journal of medicine, vol. 355, 2006
Authors: James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 16473285
Journal-article: Current problems in pediatric and adolescent health care, vol. 36, 2006
Authors: James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 16473283
Journal-article: Current problems in pediatric and adolescent health care, vol. 36, 2006
Authors: James N Jarvis, Howard R Petty, Yuhong Tang, Mark Barton Frank, Philippe A Tessier, Igor Dozmorov, Kaiyu Jiang, Andrei Kindzelski, Yanmin Chen, Craig Cadwell, Mary Turner, Peter Szodoray, Julie L McGhee, Michael Centola
Abstract: Although strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an important role for adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), there remain many aspects of the disease that suggest equally important contributions of the innate immune system. We used gene expression arrays and computer modeling to examine the function in neutrophils of 25 children with polyarticular JRA. Computer analysis identified 712 genes that were differentially expressed between patients and healthy controls. Computer-assisted analysis of the differentially expressed genes demonstrated functional connections linked to both interleukin (IL)-8- and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-regulated processes. Of special note is that the gene expression fingerprint of children with active JRA remained essentially unchanged even after they had responded to therapy. This result differed markedly from our previously reported work, in which gene expression profiles in buffy coats of children with polyarticular JRA reverted to normal after disease control was achieved pharmacologically. These findings suggest that JRA neutrophils remain in an activated state even during disease quiescence. Computer modeling of array data further demonstrated disruption of gene regulatory networks in clusters of genes modulated by IFN-gamma and IL-8. These cytokines have previously been shown to independently regulate the frequency (IFN-gamma) and amplitude (IL-8) of the oscillations of key metabolites in neutrophils, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) and superoxide ion. Using real-time, high-speed, single-cell photoimaging, we observed that 6/6 JRA patients displayed a characteristic defect in 12% to 23% of the neutrophils tested. Reagents known to induce only frequency fluctuations of NAD(P)H and superoxide ion induced both frequency and amplitude fluctuations in JRA neutrophils. This is a novel finding that was observed in children with both active (n = 4) and inactive (n = 2) JRA. A subpopulation of polyarticular JRA neutrophils are in a chronic, activated state, a state that persists when the disease is well controlled pharmacologically. Furthermore, polyarticular JRA neutrophils exhibit an intrinsic defect in the regulation of metabolic oscillations and superoxide ion production. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that neutrophils play an essential role in the pathogenesis of polyarticular JRA.
PubMedId: 17002793
Journal-article: Arthritis research & therapy, vol. 8, 2006
Authors: A Aggarwal, I Dozmorov, MB Frank, K Jiang, Y Chen, M Centola, J Jarvis
Journal-article: Indian Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 1, pp. 160, 2006
Authors: K Jiang, Y Chen, J N Jarvis
Abstract: Inflammatory mediators play critical physiologic roles throughout the course of normal pregnancy. At the same time, uncontrolled inflammation appears to have an adverse affect on pregnancy outcome. Thus, a crucial task of reproductive immunology is to define the mechanisms through which inflammation is controlled at the maternal-fetal interface. We examined the signaling pathways activated in the human choriocarcinoma cell line, JAR, in response to an in vitro model of an inflammatory challenge. We incubated JAR cells with medium from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that had been activated with either LPS or PHA. Conditioned medium from each experimental model induced MAP kinase and Stat3 phosphorylation as well as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion from JAR cells. hCG secretion could be blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of MAP kinase but not by inhibition of Stat3 using an siRNA approach. The MAPK activators IL-1beta and TNFalpha both induced hCG secretion from JAR cells, but not the Stat3 activators IFN-gamma and IL-6. Furthermore, hCG secretion induced by conditioned media could be blocked by IL-1 receptor antagonist. We conclude that inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface may involve complex webs of regulatory and counter-regulatory mechanisms that involve multiple cytokines and at least two major, independent cell-signaling systems.
PubMedId: 16257052
Journal-article: Placenta, vol. 27, 2005
Authors: Kevin A Hommel, John M Chaney, Janelle L Wagner, James N Jarvis
Abstract: To examine a learned helplessness conceptualization of psychological sequela in children and adolescents with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRD) via an experimental procedure utilizing behavior-outcome contingent and noncontingent feedback. Thirty-eight children and adolescents with JRD completed measures of transient affect, self-efficacy for functional ability, and causal attributions prior to and immediately following a computerized learned helplessness induction procedure. Children across contingent and noncontingent feedback conditions experienced decreased positive affect with a slightly more pronounced decline in the noncontingent condition. Noncontingent feedback resulted in poorer internalization of success for problem solving, while contingent feedback resulted in greater internalization of success for problem solving. Additionally, posttreatment control self-efficacy was significantly greater for children in the contingent condition that initially endorsed higher levels of internal task attributions. Children with JRD who experience behavior-outcome contingency in their environment may develop increased perceptions of control over functional ability. Furthermore, environmental noncontingency may result in poorer internalization of success, whereas contingent reinforcement may enhance cognitive appraisal mechanisms (i.e., causal attributions) associated with favorable disease outcome. Despite a modest decline in positive affect for children in the noncontingent condition, mood dysfunction is not entirely explicable within the context of noncontingent reinforcement.
PubMedId: 16380313
Journal-article: Journal of psychosomatic research, vol. 60, 2005
Authors: James N Jarvis
Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are histopathologically similar diseases characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovium. The pathogenesis of these diseases is unknown, but the emergence of gene expression profiling provides considerable promise that some of the complex, interconnected immunopathologic events underlying these diseases will soon be better understood. This review will summarize the potential use of gene expression profiling as a diagnostic or prognostic modality, and the potential benefits or limits of such uses. It will conclude with a short discussion of the potential for using gene expression profiling to identify novel targets of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis and related diseases.
PubMedId: 16149869
Journal-article: Expert review of molecular diagnostics, vol. 5, 2005
Authors: Anne Duggan, James Jarvis, D Christian Derauf, C Andrew Aligne, Jeffrey Kaczorowski
Abstract: Several recommendations in the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement "The Pediatrician's Role in Community Pediatrics" underscore the essential role of research as an agent of change to promote the health and well-being of children. This article provides (1) a framework for thinking about research in community pediatrics, (2) special considerations important in conducting community-level research, (3) an example of community-level research that has significantly decreased mortality in children (prevention of sudden infant death syndrome), (4) an example of a current issue illustrating the importance of community pediatrics research (promotion of school readiness), and (5) a discussion of future directions for research. Many of the leading health problems facing the United States as outlined in Healthy People 2010 are problems that affect children or have their roots in childhood and are likely to be addressed by community-level research and interventions. It seems clear that pediatricians should be learning to participate in, advocate for, and conduct more community pediatrics research.
PubMedId: 15821310
Journal-article: Pediatrics, vol. 115, 2005
Authors: James N Jarvis, Michael Centola
PubMedId: 15652589
Journal-article: The Lancet, vol. 365, pp. 199-200, 2005
Authors: Molly M. White, John M. Chaney, Larry L. Mullins, Janelle L. Wagner, Kevin A. Hommel, Nicole R. Andrews, James N. Jarvis
Journal-article: Rehabilitation Psychology, vol. 50, pp. 224-231, 2005
Authors: James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 16093840
Journal Article: Current opinion in rheumatology, vol. 17, 2005
Authors: James N Jarvis
Journal-article: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, vol. 17, pp. 606-611, 2005
Authors: Igor Dozmorov, Nicholas Knowlton, Yuhong Tang, Alan Shields, Parima Pathipvanich, James N Jarvis, Michael Centola
Abstract: In a homogeneous group of samples, not all genes of high variability stem from experimental errors in microarray experiments. These expression variations can be attributed to many factors including natural biological oscillations or metabolic processes. The behavior of these genes can tease out important clues about naturally occurring dynamic processes in the organism or experimental system under study. We developed a statistical procedure for the selection of genes with high variability denoted hypervariable (HV) genes. After the exclusion of low expressed genes and a stabilizing log-transformation, the majority of genes have comparable residual variability. Based on an F-test, HV genes are selected as having a statistically significant difference from the majority of variability stabilized genes measured by the 'reference group'. A novel F-test clustering technique, further noted as 'F-means clustering', groups HV genes with similar variability patterns, presumably from their participation in a common dynamic biological process. F-means clustering establishes, for the first time, groups of co-expressed HV genes and is illustrated with microarray data from patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls.
PubMedId: 15514108
Journal-article: Nucleic acids research, vol. 32, 2004
Authors: Joyce Mauldin, H Dan Cameron, Diane Jeanotte, Glenn Solomon, James N Jarvis
Abstract: High prevalence rates for rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus have been described in American Indian and Alaskan Native adults. The impact of these diseases on American Indian children has not been investigated. We used International Classification of Diseases-9 (ICD-9) codes to search two Indian Health Service (IHS) patient registration databases over the years 1998-2000, searching for individuals 19 years of age or younger with specific ICD-9-specified diagnoses. Crude estimates for disease prevalence were made based on the number of individuals identified with these diagnoses within the database. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) / juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) was the most frequent diagnosis given. The prevalence rate for JRA in the Oklahoma City Area was estimated as 53 per 100,000 individuals at risk, while in the Billings Area, the estimated prevalence was nearly twice that, at 115 per 100,000. These rates are considerably higher than those reported in the most recent European studies. Chronic arthritis in childhood represents an important, though unrecognized, chronic health challenge within the American Indian population living in the United States.
PubMedId: 15333136
Journal-article: BMC musculoskeletal disorders, vol. 5, 2004
Authors: Julie L McGhee, Lauren M Kickingbird, James N Jarvis
Abstract: Antinuclear antibody (ANA) tests are frequently used to screen children for chronic inflammatory diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the diagnostic utility of this test is limited because of the large number of healthy children who have low-titer positive tests. We sought to determine the clinical utility of ANA tests in screening children for rheumatic disease and to determine whether there are specific signs or symptoms that enhance the clinical utility of ANA tests in children. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 509 new patient referrals. Charts of patients referred because of results of ANA testing were selected for further analysis. Children with JRA, SLE, and other conditions were compared using demographic data, chief complaints at the time of presentation, and ANA titers. One hundred ten patients were referred because of an ANA test interpreted as positive. Ten patients were subsequently diagnosed with SLE. In addition, we identified one patient with mixed connective tissue disease, and an additional child with idiopathic Raynaud's phenomenon. Eighteen children of the children referred for a positive ANA test had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Another 80 children with positive ANA tests were identified, the majority of whom (n = 39, 49%) had musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Neither the presence nor the titer of ANA served to distinguish children with JRA from children with other musculoskeletal conditions. Children with JRA were readily identified on the basis of the history and physical examination. Children with SLE were therefore compared with children with positive ANA tests who did not have JRA, designated the "comparison group." Non-urticarial rash was more common in children with SLE than in children without chronic inflammatory disease (p = 0.007). Children with SLE were also older (mean +/- sd = 14.2 +/- 2.5 years) than the comparison group (11.0 +/- 3.6 years; p = 0.001). ANA titer was also a significant discriminator between children with SLE and children without chronic inflammatory disease. The median ANA titer in children with SLE was 1: 1,080 compared with 1:160 for other children (p < 0.0001). ANA titers of >/=1,080 had a positive predictive value for SLE of 1.0 while titers of
PubMedId: 15245579
Journal-article: BMC pediatrics, vol. 4, 2004
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, James N Jarvis
Abstract: We have previously shown that T cells can be activated through cell-surface C1q receptors, resulting in secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), further demonstrating the intimate linkage between innate and adaptive immunity. In this current report, we sought to determine whether: (1) T cell responses to C1q-bearing immune complexes are dependent on the maturational status of the T cells and (2) whether signaling through the C1q receptor on T cells modulates conventional activation mediated through the conventional T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 signaling complex. We first examined the capacity of neonatal T cells to respond to C1q-bearing immune complexes using IFNgamma, IL-2, and MIF secretion as measures of activation (MIF was chosen because of its crucial role in coordinating innate and adaptive immunity). Neonatal T cells produced significantly less IFNgamma but not IL-2, when stimulated by C1q immune complexes compared with adult T cells. MIF levels did not exceed background levels in these experiments. Next, we examined the capacity of C1q-bearing immune complexes to regulate signaling through the conventional TCR/CD3 signaling complex. Pre-incubating adult T cells with C1q-bearing immune complexes significantly reduced IFNgamma secretion when those same cells were subsequently stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies. Pre-incubation of neonatal T-cells with C1q-bearing immune complexes had no effect on IFNgamma secretion, although IFNgamma secretion was lower than that found in adult T cells for each experimental condition. We speculate that reduced IFNgamma secretion after pre-incubation with C1q immune complexes may be due to IL-10 secretion, which was observed in C1q-stimulated adult (but not neonatal) T cells. C1q-bearing immune complexes exert complex effects on mature T cells that include both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. Immunologic maturation is required for these effects, as cord blood T cells are relatively hyporesponsive to C1q-bearing immune complexes compared with adult T cells.
PubMedId: 15331329
Journal-article: Cellular immunology, vol. 229, 2004
Authors: S M Lawrence, Y Tang, I Dozmorov, M B Frank, M Centola, J N Jarvis
Journal-article: Journal of Investigative Medicine, vol. 52, pp. S297-S298, 2004
Authors: S M Lawrence, Y Tang, I Dozmorov, M B Frank, M Centola, J N Jarvis
Journal-article: Journal of Investigative Medicine, vol. 52, pp. S297.6-S29, 2004
Authors: James N Jarvis, Igor Dozmorov, Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, Mark Barton Frank, Craig Cadwell, Sean Turner, Michael Centola
Abstract: The immunologic adaptations of pregnancy have come under increasing scrutiny in the past 15 years. Existing experimental evidence clearly demonstrates that placental trophoblasts play an important role in regulating immunologic/inflammatory responses at the maternal-fetal interface. We used a well-developed gene expression array to examine in greater detail the physiologic response of trophoblast-like choriocarcinoma cells to a model immunologic 'challenge.' We co-cultured PHA-activated or resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR for time periods ranging from 2 to 18 h. Messenger RNA expression in the JAR cells was then assessed using a 21,329-gene microarray and novel biostatistical analyses that we have previously published. Patterns of differential gene expression were assessed using a commercial pathway analysis software program. Differences in gene expression between JAR cells cultured with activated PBMC (experimental samples) and JAR cells cultured with resting PBMC (control samples) were seen only at the 2h time point. That is, multiple genes were transcribed in JAR cells in response to activated PBMC, but expression levels of the genes had all returned to baseline by 6h. Molecular modeling demonstrated that the differentially expressed genes were largely associated with cell growth and differentiation. This model was confirmed by noting a two-fold increase in CD10/neutral endopeptidase expression (a marker for cell differentiation) in JAR cells incubated with media from activated PBMC compared with JAR cells incubated with resting PBMC. These findings support the hypothesis that there is a delicate immunologic milieu at the maternal-fetal interface that must be maintained. Immunologic/inflammatory challenge at the maternal-fetal interface is compensated by cellular mechanisms that work to reduce inflammation and rapidly restore immunologic balance.
PubMedId: 15063633
Journal-article: Journal of reproductive immunology, vol. 61, 2003
Authors: James N Jarvis, Igor Dozmorov, Kaiyu Jiang, Mark Barton Frank, Peter Szodoray, Philip Alex, Michael Centola
Abstract: Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) has a complex, poorly characterized pathophysiology. Modeling of transcriptosome behavior in pathologic specimens using microarrays allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases. However, conventional analyses rely on identifying statistically significant differences in gene expression distributions between patients and controls. Since the principal aspects of disease pathophysiology vary significantly among patients, these analyses are biased. Genes with highly variable expression, those most likely to regulate and affect pathologic processes, are excluded from selection, as their distribution among healthy and affected individuals may overlap significantly. Here we describe a novel method for analyzing microarray data that assesses statistically significant changes in gene behavior at the population level. This method was applied to expression profiles of peripheral blood leukocytes from a group of children with polyarticular JRA and healthy control subjects. Results from this method are compared with those from a conventional analysis of differential gene expression and shown to identify discrete subsets of functionally related genes relevant to disease pathophysiology. These results reveal the complex action of the innate and adaptive immune responses in patients and specifically underscore the role of IFN-gamma in disease pathophysiology. Discriminant function analysis of data from a cohort of patients treated with conventional therapy identified additional subsets of functionally related genes; the results may predict treatment outcomes. While data from only 9 patients and 12 healthy controls was used, this preliminary investigation of the inflammatory genomics of JRA illustrates the significant potential of utilizing complementary sets of bioinformatics tools to maximize the clinical relevance of microarray data from patients with autoimmune disease, even in small cohorts.
PubMedId: 14979934
Journal-article: Arthritis research & therapy, vol. 6, 2003
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, James N. Jarvis
Journal-article: Journal of Reproductive Immunology, vol. 60, pp. 113-128, 2003
Authors: Kaiyu Jiang, Yanmin Chen, James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 14638439
Journal Article: Journal of reproductive immunology, vol. 60, 2003
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Sophia Y. Cleland
Journal-article: Current Rheumatology Reports, vol. 5, pp. 471-476, 2003
Authors: James N Jarvis, Sophia Y Cleland
PubMedId: 14609493
Comparative Study: Current rheumatology reports, vol. 5, 2003
Authors: Janelle L Wagner, John M Chaney, Kevin A Hommel, Melanie C Page, Larry L Mullins, Molly M White, James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 12968037
Journal Article: Journal of pediatric psychology, vol. 28, 2003
Authors: K. JIANG, Y. CHEN, C.-S. XU, J. N. JARVIS
Journal-article: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, vol. 131, pp. 61-67, 2003
Authors: K Jiang, Y Chen, C-S Xu, J N Jarvis
PubMedId: 12519387
Journal Article: Clinical and experimental immunology, vol. 131, 2003
Authors: J. L. McGhee, F. N. Burks, J. L. Sheckels, J. N. Jarvis
Journal-article: PEDIATRICS, vol. 110, pp. 354-359, 2002
Authors: Julie L McGhee, Frank N Burks, Julie L Sheckels, James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 12165590
Journal Article: Pediatrics, vol. 110, 2002
Authors: James N Jarvis
Journal-article: Pediatric Annals, vol. 31, pp. 437-446, 2002
Authors: James N Jarvis
PubMedId: 12149797
Journal Article: Pediatric annals, vol. 31, 2002
Authors: Inocencio Antonio Cuesta, Karen Kerr, Pippa Simpson, James N. Jarvis
Journal-article: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 154, pp. 122, 2000
Authors: I A Cuesta, K Kerr, P Simpson, J N Jarvis
PubMedId: 10665597
Journal Article: Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine, vol. 154, 2000
Authors: J N Jarvis, C Xu, W Wang, H R Petty, M Gonzalez, N Morssy, F Waxman, A Quintero del Rio
Abstract: We have previously shown that immune complexes isolated from children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are heterogeneous in their size, composition, and proinflammatory capacities. The experiments described here were undertaken to clarify further the roles of size and composition in determining the proinflammatory effects of immune complexes. We incubated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with different soluble immune complex preparations: opsonized complexes, which were formed in the presence of serum, unopsonized complexes, which were formed in the absence of serum, and immune precipitates solubilized by complement after their formation. ELISA assays showed that immune complexes formed in the presence of complement were less efficient than unopsonized complexes in inducing IL-1beta and IL-8 secretion from leukocytes. Solubilized immune precipitates showed intermediate capacity to stimulate the release of both cytokines. Complexes formed in heat-inactivated serum were as efficient as unopsonized complexes in eliciting cytokine secretion from the cells. The capacity of complement to regulate cytokine secretion from leukocytes was related, at least in part, to immune complex size. Sucrose density gradients showed unopsonized complexes and solubilized immune precipitates were larger than opsonized immune complexes. In contrast, fluid-phase binding of C4 to immune complexes, which did not appreciably change immune complex size, substantially increased IL-1beta secretion from PBMC.
PubMedId: 10600339
Journal-article: Clinical immunology (Orlando, Fla.), vol. 93, 1999
Authors: A Amit, A L Kindzelskii, J Zanoni, J N Jarvis, H R Petty
Abstract: Neutrophils exhibit intrinsic sinusoidal metabolite concentration oscillations of 3 min in resting cells and an additional approximately 10- or 20-s oscillation in migrating/adhering cells. To better understand immune complex (IC)-mediated leukocyte activation, we have studied neutrophil metabolic oscillations in the presence of ICs either with or without fixed complement. Using a microscope photometer we quantitated NAD(P)H autofluorescence oscillations. Cells exposed to ICs exhibited metabolic oscillation periods of approximately 12 s in the absence of complement and approximately 22 s in the presence of complement opsonization. To determine if the effects could be associated with C3 deposition, we used ICs opsonized with only C3 or only C1 and C4. Untreated ICs, heat-inactivated complement-treated ICs, and C1,C4-treated ICs trigger rapid metabolic oscillations, as do fMLP and yeast; in contrast, ICs treated with full complement or C3 alone did not affect NAD(P)H oscillations in comparison to controls. The induction of higher frequency (approximately 10 s) NAD(P)H oscillations by ICs could be blocked by addition of anti-FcgammaRII, but not FcgammaRIII mAb fragments, suggesting the participation of FcgammaRII in cellular metabolic responses to ICs. Parallel changes in the frequencies of oxidant release and pericellular proteolysis were found for all of these stimuli. Thus, immune complex composition affects both intracellular metabolic signals and extracellular functional oscillations. We suggest that complement attenuates the phlogistic potential of ICs by reducing the frequency of cytoplasmic NAD(P)H oscillations.
PubMedId: 10357880
Journal-article: Cellular immunology, vol. 194, 1999
Authors: James N Jarvis, Sui-Hui Wang
Journal-article: Pediatric Research, vol. 45, pp. 358A-358A, 1999
Authors: James N Jarvis, Suhong Xiao
Journal-article: Pediatric Research, vol. 45, pp. 358A-358A, 1999
Authors: J N Jarvis, C Xu, L Zhao, M Iobidze, H T Moore
Abstract: Some authors have suggested that fetally derived syncytiotrophoblasts, which form the barrier between mother and the fetus, are an integral part of a complex macrophage-cytokine network involving maternal leukocytes, decidual cells, placental tissues, and even the fetus itself. We report here that syncytiotrophoblast-like JAR cells, a human choriocarcinoma cell line, share another feature common to cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, the ability to secrete IL-1beta when stimulated through their Fc(gamma) receptors. We incubated JAR cells with physiologically relevant concentrations of model BSA-rabbit IgG-anti-BSA immune complexes or monomeric rabbit IgG for periods of up to 72 h. Both monomeric IgG and immune complexes induced IL-1beta from JAR cells, although levels produced by immune complexes were approximately twice those induced by monomeric IgG. IL-1beta secretion was not inhibited by cycloheximide, and Western blots of JAR cell lysates using pro-IL-1beta MAb revealed constitutive expression of a 31-kD protein, whose levels declined within 2 h of stimulation by either IgG or immune complexes, but returned to baseline within 18 h.
PubMedId: 9545006
Journal-article: Pediatric research, vol. 43, 1998
Authors: James N. Jarvis
Journal-article: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, vol. 10, pp. 459-467, 1998
Authors: J N Jarvis
PubMedId: 9746862
Journal Article: Current opinion in rheumatology, vol. 10, 1998
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Glen Solomon
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset, 1998
Authors: J N Jarvis, W Wang, H T Moore, L Zhao, C Xu
Abstract: To characterize juvenile rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid (SF) immune complexes and to examine their interaction with leukocytes. SF immunoglobulin-containing fractions were prepared by sequential chromatography on protein A and Sephacryl 300. Fractions were subdivided according to molecular weight, characterized for immunoglobulin and complement content, and incubated with either promonocytic U937 cells or normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). High molecular weight SF immunoglobulin-containing fractions stimulated the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) from U937 cells. These same complexes stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from PBMC. Lower molecular weight material was less efficient in inducing any of the cytokines. TNFalpha and IL-1beta were the earliest of the messenger RNAs examined to be induced by the high molecular weight complexes. However, the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF stimulated by the complexes was not completely dependent upon the secretion of IL-1beta. Addition of IL-1 receptor antagonist to the cell cultures reduced GM-CSF and IL-6 production by 40% and IL-8 production by 25% in PBMC. SF immunoglobulin fractions contain immune complexes that vary in size, composition, and phlogistic potential. High molecular weight complexes are capable of inducing a spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines, all of which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatic disease.
PubMedId: 9365094
Journal-article: Arthritis and rheumatism, vol. 40, 1997
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Cheng Su Xu, Wenlian Wang, Alit Amit, Andreii Kindzelski, Howard R. Petty
Journal-article: Pediatric Research, vol. 41, pp. 309-309, 1997
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Wenlian Wang, Heide T. Moore, Lin Zhao, Chengsu Xu
Journal-article: Arthritis & Rheumatism, vol. 40, pp. 2039-2046, 1997
Authors: M M Schwartz, P Simpson, K L Kerr, J N Jarvis
PubMedId: 9292811
Comparative Study: The Journal of rheumatology, vol. 24, 1997
Authors: J N Jarvis, L Zhao, C S Xu, H T Moore, S Berry
PubMedId: 9428992
Comparative Study: Biology of the neonate, vol. 72, 1997
Authors: Margaret M. Schwartz, Pam Davis, Pippa Simpson, Paul Wooley, Karen L. Kerr, James N. Jarvis
Journal-article: Pediatric Research, vol. 41, pp. 311-311, 1997
Authors: James N. Jarvis, ChengSu Xu, Alit Amit
Journal-article: Pediatric Research, vol. 41, pp. 309-309, 1997
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Alit Amit, Julie McLaughlin, ChengSu Xu, Wenlian Wang
Journal-article: Pediatric Research, vol. 41, pp. 309-309, 1997
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Lin Zhao, Heide T. Moore, P.Michael Long, P.Vani Gutta
Journal-article: Cellular Immunology, vol. 168, pp. 251-257, 1996
Authors: J N Jarvis, L Zhao, H T Moore, P M Long, P Vani Gutta
PubMedId: 8640872
Comparative Study: Cellular immunology, vol. 168, 1996
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Heide T. Moore, Nancy Fine, Stanley M. Berry
PubMedId: 8724649
Journal-article: Neonatology, vol. 69, pp. 225-229, 1996
Authors: James N Jarvis, Cheng Su Xu
Journal-article: Pediatric Research, vol. 39, pp. 394-394, 1996
Authors: J N Jarvis, L Deng, S M Berry, R Romero, H Moore
Abstract: Cytokine expression at the maternal-fetal interface is well documented. Some authors have postulated the existence of a bidirectional cytokine signaling mechanism that is critical to the maintenance of normal pregnancy. The role of the fetus (versus fetally derived placental tissues) in this process is unknown. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques, we studied paired maternal and fetal samples from 16 pregnancies (including two twin pregnancies) for the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA. We demonstrate that mRNA for both of these cytokines can be detected in both maternal and fetal blood as early as the 21st wk of gestation. These results support a potential role for the fetus in the bidirectional cytokine signaling of pregnancy.
PubMedId: 7541127
Journal-article: Pediatric research, vol. 37, 1995
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Heide Taylor, P. Michael Long, P. Vani Gutta, Tracey Pousak, Nancy Fine
Journal-article: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes & Human Retrovirology, vol. 9, pp. 249???256, 1995
Authors: J N Jarvis, H Taylor, P M Long, P V Gutta, T Pousak, N Fine
PubMedId: 7540489
Journal Article: Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes and human retrovirology : official publication of the International Retrovirology Association, vol. 9, 1995
Authors: J N Jarvis, M M Diebold, M K Chadwell, M Iobidze, H T Moore
PubMedId: 7774064
Journal Article: Clinical and experimental immunology, vol. 100, 1995
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Heide Taylor, Madonna Iobidze
Journal-article: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes & Human Retrovirology, vol. 8, pp. 480-485, 1995
Authors: J N Jarvis, H Taylor, M Iobidze
PubMedId: 7697445
Journal Article: Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes and human retrovirology : official publication of the International Retrovirology Association, vol. 8, 1995
Authors: J N Jarvis, H Taylor, M Iobidze, M Krenz
PubMedId: 7932426
Journal Article: The Journal of rheumatology, vol. 21, 1994
Authors: J N Jarvis, M Iobidze, H Taylor, J DeJonge, S Chang
Abstract: Circulating immune complexes have been described in both juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and in AIDS. We isolated high-molecular-weight complexes from plasma of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and congenital human immunodeficiency virus infection by sequential gel filtration followed by affinity chromatography on protein A-Sepharose. We demonstrate that 1) mixed IgG-, IgM-, and IgA-bearing immune complexes can be found in both juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and congenital human immunodeficiency virus infection and 2) complexes isolated via affinity chromatography on protein A-Sepharose do not have detectable C4 but activate the classic complement pathway in vitro.
PubMedId: 8108193
Journal-article: Pediatric research, vol. 34, 1993
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Heide Taylor, Madonna Iobidze, Janelle Dejonge, Sandra Chang, Flossie Cohen
Journal-article: Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, vol. 67, pp. 50-54, 1993
Authors: J N Jarvis, H Taylor, M Iobidze, J Dejonge, S Chang, F Cohen
PubMedId: 8443984
Journal Article: Clinical immunology and immunopathology, vol. 67, 1993
Authors: J N Jarvis, J C Lockman, R P Levine
PubMedId: 8508555
Journal Article: Clinical and experimental rheumatology, vol. 11, 1993
Authors: J N Jarvis, T Pousak, M Krenz, M Iobidze, H Taylor
PubMedId: 8441140
Journal Article: The Journal of rheumatology, vol. 20, 1993
Authors: J N Jarvis, T Pousak, M Krenz
PubMedId: 1437439
Journal Article: Pediatrics, vol. 90, 1992
Authors: James N. Jarvis, Joseph Kaplan, Nancy Fine
Journal-article: Arthritis & Rheumatism, vol. 35, pp. 204-207, 1992
Authors: J N Jarvis, J Kaplan, N Fine
PubMedId: 1370899
Journal Article: Arthritis and rheumatism, vol. 35, 1992
Authors: Rachelle R. Ramsey, Jamie L. Ryan, Larry L. Mullins, James N. Jarvis, John M. Chaney
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Authors: Jamie L. Ryan, Rachelle R. Ramsey, David A. Fedele, Ashley N. Junghans, James N. Jarvis, Larry L. Mullins, John M. Chaney
Dataset: PsycEXTRA Dataset,
Presented by CUBS © 2022