UB Vice President for Research and Economic Development markup
Daniel J. Kosman UB Profile
Biochemistry
SUNY Distinguished Professor
653 Biomedical Education Building
140 Farber Hall (mailing address)
Buffalo NY 14214
716-829-2842
Export
Publication Types
Co-Authors
  • More Coauthors +
 
Authors: Changyi Ji, Brittany L. Steimle, Danielle K. Bailey, Daniel J. Kosman
Keywords: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) Ferroportin (Fpn) Ferroxidase Hephaestin (Hp) Iron efflux Primary hippocampal neurons
Abstract: Iron efflux in mammalian cells is mediated by the ferrous iron exporter ferroportin (Fpn); Fpn plasma membrane localization and function are supported by a multicopper ferroxidase and/or the soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP). Fpn and APP are ubiquitously expressed in all cell types in the central nervous system including neurons. In contrast, neuronal ferroxidase(s) expression has not been well characterized. Using primary cultures of hippocampal neurons, we examined the molecular mechanism of neuronal Fe efflux in detail. Developmental increases of Fpn, APP, and the ferroxidase hephaestin (Hp) were observed in hippocampal neurons. Iron efflux in these neurons depended on the level of Fpn localized at the cell surface; as noted, Fpn stability is supported by ferroxidase activity, an enzymatic activity that is required for Fe efflux. Iron accumulation increases and iron efflux decreases in Hp knockout neurons. In contrast, suppression of endogenous APP by RNAi knockdown does not affect surface Fpn stability or Fe efflux. These data support the model that the neuronal ferroxidase Hp plays a unique role in support of Fpn-mediated Fe efflux in primary hippocampal neurons. Our data also demonstrate that Hp ferroxidase activity relies on copper bioavailability, which suggests neuronal iron homeostasis will be modulated by cellular copper status.
PubMedId: 29177638
Journal-article: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology, 2017
Authors: Xiaobin Wu, Heejeong Kim, Javier Seravalli, Joseph J. Barycki, P. John Hart, David W. Gohara, Enrico Di Cera, Won Hee Jung, Daniel J. Kosman, Jaekwon Lee
Keywords: copper ferroxidase iron iron response element (IRE) potassium transport protein secretion
Abstract: Acquisition and distribution of metal ions support a number of biological processes. Here we show that respiratory growth of and iron acquisition by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on potassium (K(+)) compartmentalization to the trans-Golgi network via Kha1p, a K(+)/H(+) exchanger. K(+) in the trans-Golgi network facilitates binding of copper to the Fet3p multi-copper ferroxidase. The effect of K(+) is not dependent on stable binding with Fet3p or alteration of the characteristics of the secretory pathway. The data suggest that K(+) acts as a chemical factor in Fet3p maturation, a role similar to that of cations in folding of nucleic acids. Up-regulation of KHA1 gene in response to iron limitation via iron-specific transcription factors indicates that K(+) compartmentalization is linked to cellular iron homeostasis. Our study reveals a novel functional role of K(+) in the binding of copper to apoFet3p and identifies a K(+)/H(+) exchanger at the secretory pathway as a new molecular factor associated with iron uptake in yeast.
PubMedId: 26966178
Journal-article: Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 291, pp. 9796-9806, 2016
Authors: Elisa Fl??via L. C. Bail??o, Patr??cia de Sousa Lima, Mirelle G. Silva-Bail??o, Alexandre M. Bail??o, Gabriel da Rocha Fernandes, Daniel J. Kosman, C??lia Maria de Almeida Soares
Keywords: ferric reductase iron reduction iron uptake multicopper oxidases paracoccidioidomycosis zinc-regulated transporter
Abstract: Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all organisms, including fungi. Usually, fungi can uptake iron through receptor-mediated internalization of a siderophore or heme, and/or reductive iron assimilation (RIA). Traditionally, the RIA pathway consists of ferric reductases (Fres), ferroxidase (Fet3) and a high-affinity iron permease (Ftr1). Paracoccidioides spp. genomes do not present an Ftr1 homolog. However, this fungus expresses zinc regulated transporter homologs (Zrts), members of the ZIP family of membrane transporters that are able in some organisms to transport zinc and iron. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC)-overlay assay indicates that both Pb01 and Pb18 express a ferric reductase activity; however, (59)Fe uptake assays indicate that only in Pb18 is this activity coupled to a reductase-dependent iron uptake pathway. In addition, Zrts are up-regulated in iron deprivation, as indicated by RNAseq and qRT-PCR using Pb01 transcripts. RNAseq strategy also demonstrated that transcripts related to siderophore uptake and biosynthesis are up-regulated in iron-deprived condition. The data suggest that the fungus could use both a non-classical RIA, comprising ferric reductases and Fe/Zn permeases (Zrts), and siderophore uptake pathways under iron-limited conditions. The study of iron metabolism reveals novel surface molecules that could function as accessible targets for drugs to block iron uptake and, consequently, inhibit pathogen's proliferation.
PubMedId: 26441843
Journal-article: Frontiers in Microbiology, vol. 6, 2015
Authors: Ryan C McCarthy, Daniel J Kosman
Keywords: Alzheimers disease blood-brain barrier cell communication ferroxidase iron transport
Abstract: The transcellular trafficking of iron from the blood into the brain interstitium depends on iron uptake proteins in the apical membrane of brain microvascular capillary endothelial cells and efflux proteins at the basolateral, abluminal membrane. In this review, we discuss the three mechanisms by which these cells take-up iron from the blood and the sole mechanism by which they efflux this iron into the abluminal space. We then focus on the regulation of this efflux pathway by exocrine factors that are released from neighboring astrocytes. Also discussed are the cytokines secreted by capillary cells that regulate the expression of these glial cell signals. Among the interstitial factors that regulate iron efflux into the brain is the Amyloid precursor protein (APP). The role of this amyliodogenic species in brain iron metabolism is discussed. Last, we speculate on the potential relationship between iron transport at the blood-brain barrier and neurological disorders associated with iron mismanagement.
PubMedId: 26236187
Journal-article: Frontiers in molecular neuroscience, vol. 8, 2015
Authors: Changyi Ji, Daniel J Kosman
Keywords: NTBI TBI Zip8 ferrireductase permease primary hippocampal neurons
Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of iron trafficking in neurons have not been elucidated. In this study, we characterized the expression and localization of ferrous iron transporters Zip8, Zip14 and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferrireductases Steap2 and stromal cell-derived receptor 2 in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Steap2 and Zip8 partially co-localize, indicating these two proteins may function in Fe(3+) reduction prior to Fe(2+) permeation. Zip8, DMT1, and Steap2 co-localize with the transferrin receptor/transferrin complex, suggesting they may be involved in transferrin receptor/transferrin-mediated iron assimilation. In brain interstitial fluid, transferring-bound iron (TBI) and non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) exist as potential iron sources. Primary hippocampal neurons exhibit significant iron uptake from TBI (Transferrin-(59) Fe(3+)) and NTBI, whether presented as (59) Fe(2+) -citrate or (59) Fe(3+) -citrate; reductase-independent (59) Fe(2+) uptake was the most efficient uptake pathway of the three. Kinetic analysis of Zn(2+) inhibition of Fe(2+) uptake indicated that DMT1 plays only a minor role in the uptake of NTBI. In contrast, localization and knockdown data indicate that Zip8 makes a major contribution. Data suggest also that cell accumulation of (59) Fe from TBI relies at least in part on an endocytosis-independent pathway. These data suggest that Zip8 and Steap2 play a major role in iron accumulation from NTBI and TBI by hippocampal neurons. Analysis of the expression and localization of known iron uptake transporters demonstrated that Zip8 makes a major contribution to iron accumulation in primary cultures of rat embryonic hippocampal neurons. These cells exhibit uptake pathways for ferrous and ferric iron (non-transferrin-bound iron, NTBI in figure) and for transferrin-bound iron; the ferrireductases Steap2 and SDR2 support the uptake of ferric iron substrates. Zip8 and Steap2 are strongly expressed in the plasma membrane of both soma and processes, implying a crucial role in iron accumulation from NTBI and transferrin-bound iron (TBI) by hippocampal neurons.
PubMedId: 25649872
Journal-article: Journal of neurochemistry, vol. 133, 2014
Authors: Ryan C McCarthy, Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: (1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and (2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid- peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
PubMedId: 25355056
Journal-article: Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS, vol. 72, 2014
Authors: Ryan C McCarthy, Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) involves the cooperation of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) and their neighboring astrocytes. Astrocytes secrete a soluble form of ceruloplasmin (sCp) which, in turn, acts to export iron from ferroportin (Fpn) on the basolateral surface of BMVEC. Although regulation of astrocyte sCp gene expression has been demonstrated to be influenced by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), the role of neighboring BMVEC in this regulation has yet to be determined and is the basis for this work. We provide evidence that human BMVEC (hBMVEC) IL-1 and IL-6 positively influence the expression of sCp transcript by neighboring C6 glioma cells (astrocytes). The effect of hBMVEC on C6 glioma sCp expression at the level of transcript and protein was repressed via the addition of IL-1 and IL-6 pathway inhibitors (IL-1 receptor antagonist protein and SC144, respectively). Stimulation of hBMVEC interleukin gene expression by apical exposure to bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide significantly enhanced hBMVEC-mediated C6 glioma sCp gene expression. hBMVEC influence the gene expression of neighboring C6 glioma sCp. This change in gene expression is mediated by the secretion of IL-1 and IL-6 from hBMVEC. Furthermore, the hBMVEC-induced increase in neighboring C6 glioma sCp gene expression leads to an increased rate of hBMVEC iron efflux. Taken together, our results indicate that hBMVEC-secreted cytokine activity increases the gene expression of neighboring C6 glioma sCp, which reciprocally acts on basolateral hBMVEC Fpn to enhance brain iron import.
PubMedId: 25311416
Journal-article: Cell communication and signaling : CCS, vol. 12, 2014
Authors: Ryan C McCarthy, Yun-Hee Park, Daniel J Kosman
Keywords: bloodbrain barrier brain iron metabolism ferroportin iron transport sAPP
Abstract: A sequence within the E2 domain of soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) stimulates iron efflux. This activity has been attributed to a ferroxidase activity suggested for this motif. We demonstrate that the stimulation of efflux supported by this peptide and by sAPP is due to their stabilization of the ferrous iron exporter, ferroportin (Fpn), in the plasma membrane of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMVEC). The peptide does not bind ferric iron explaining why it does not and thermodynamically cannot promote ferrous iron autoxidation. This peptide specifically pulls Fpn down from the plasma membrane of hBMVEC; based on these results, FTP, for ferroportin-targeting peptide, correctly identifies the function of this peptide. The data suggest that in stabilizing Fpn via the targeting due to the FTP sequence, sAPP will increase the flux of iron into the cerebral interstitium. This inference correlates with the observation of significant iron deposition in the amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.
PubMedId: 24867889
Journal-article: EMBO reports, vol. 15, 2014
Authors: Ryan C McCarthy, Daniel J Kosman
Journal-article: Cell Communication and Signaling, vol. 12, pp. 65, 2014
Authors: Christian H. Kjaergaard, Munzarin F. Qayyum, Anthony J. Augustine, Lynn Ziegler, Daniel J. Kosman, Keith O. Hodgson, Britt Hedman, Edward I. Solomon
Abstract: Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) carry out the most energy efficient reduction of O2 to H2O known, i.e., with the lowest overpotential. This four-electron process requires an electron mediating type 1 (T1) Cu site and an oxygen reducing trinuclear Cu cluster (TNC), consisting of a binuclear type 3 (T3)- and a mononuclear type 2 (T2) Cu center. The rate-determining step in O2 reduction is the first two-electron transfer from one of the T3 Cu's (T3) and the T2 Cu, forming a bridged peroxide intermediate (PI). This reaction has been investigated in T3 Cu variants of the Fet3p, where a first shell His ligand is mutated to Glu or Gln. This converts the fast two-electron reaction of the wild-type (WT) enzyme to a slow one-electron oxidation of the TNC. Both variants initially react to form a common T3 Cu(II) intermediate that converts to the Glu or Gln bound resting state. From spectroscopic evaluation, the nonmutated His ligands coordinate linearly to the T3 Cu in the reduced TNCs in the two variants, in contrast to the trigonal arrangement observed in the WT enzyme. This structural perturbation is found to significantly alter the electronic structure of the reduced TNC, which is no longer capable of rapidly transferring two electrons to the two perpendicular half occupied *-orbitals of O2, in contrast to the WT enzyme. This study provides new insight into the geometric and electronic structure requirements of a fully functional TNC for the rate determining two-electron reduction of O2 in the MCOs.
PubMedId: 23631422
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 52, pp. 3702-3711, 2013
Authors: Ryan C McCarthy, Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: We have used an in vitro model system to probe the iron transport pathway across the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This model consists of human BMVEC (hBMVEC) and C6 glioma cells (as an astrocytic cell line) grown in a transwell, a cell culture system commonly used to quantify metabolite flux across a cell-derived barrier. We found that iron efflux from hBMVEC through the ferrous iron permease ferroportin (Fpn) was stimulated by secretion of the soluble form of the multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (sCp) from the co-cultured C6 cells. Reciprocally, expression of sCp mRNA in the C6 cells was increased by neighboring hBMVEC. In addition, data indicate that C6 cell-secreted hepcidin stimulates internalization of hBMVEC Fpn but only when the end-feet projections characteristic of this glia-derived cell line are proximal to the endothelial cells. This hepcidin-dependent loss of Fpn correlated with knock-down of iron efflux from the hBMVEC; this result was consistent with the mechanism by which hepcidin regulates iron efflux in mammalian cells. In summary, the data support a model of iron trafficking across the BBB in which the capillary endothelium induce the underlying astrocytes to produce the ferroxidase activity needed to support Fpn-mediated iron efflux. Reciprocally, astrocyte proximity modulates the effective concentration of hepcidin at the endothelial cell membrane and thus the surface expression of hBMVEC Fpn. These results are independent of the source of hBMVEC iron (transferrin or non-transferrin bound) indicating that the model developed here is broadly applicable to brain iron homeostasis.
PubMedId: 24533165
Journal-article: PloS one, vol. 9, 2013
Authors: Ryan C McCarthy, Daniel J Kosman
Keywords: Blood Brain Barrier Brain Metabolism Cell Biology Ceruloplasmin Ferroportin Ferroxidase Hephaestin Iron Metabolism Neurochemistry Transport Metals
Abstract: The mechanism(s) of iron flux across the brain microvasculature endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the blood-brain barrier remains unknown. Although both hephaestin (Hp) and the ferrous iron permease ferroportin (Fpn) have been identified in BMVEC, their roles in iron efflux have not been examined. Using a human BMVEC line (hBMVEC), we have demonstrated that these proteins are required for iron efflux from these cells. Expression of both Hp and Fpn protein was confirmed in hBMVEC by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence; we show that hBMVEC express soluble ceruloplasmin (Cp) transcript as well. Depletion of endogenous Hp and Cp via copper chelation leads to the reduction of hBMVEC Fpn protein levels as well as a complete inhibition of (59)Fe efflux. Both hBMVEC Fpn protein and (59)Fe efflux activity are restored upon incubation with 6.6 nm soluble plasma Cp. These results are independent of the source of cell iron, whether delivered as transferrin- or non-transferrin-bound (59)Fe. Our results demonstrate that iron efflux from hBMVEC Fpn requires the action of an exocytoplasmic ferroxidase, which can be either endogenous Hp or extracellular Cp.
PubMedId: 23640881
Journal-article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 288, 2013
Authors: Ryan C. McCarthy, Daniel J. Kosman
Abstract: The mechanism(s) by which iron in blood is transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains controversial. Here we have examined the first step of this trans-cellular pathway, namely the mechanism(s) of iron uptake into human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMVEC). We show that hBMVEC actively reduce non-transferrin bound Fe(III) (NTBI) and transferrin-bound Fe(III) (TBI); this activity is associated with one or more ferrireductases. Efficient, exo-cytoplasmic ferri-reduction from TBI is dependent upon transferrin receptor (TfR), also. Blocking holo-Tf binding with an anti-TfR antibody significantly decreases the reduction of iron from transferrin by hBMVEC, suggesting that holo-Tf needs to bind to TfR in order for efficient reduction to occur. Ferri-reduction from TBI significantly decreases when hBMVEC are pre-treated with Pt(II), an inhibitor of cell surface reductase activity. Uptake of (59)Fe from (59)Fe-Tf by endothelial cells is inhibited by 50?% when ferrozine is added to solution; in contrast, no inhibition occurs when cells are alkalinized with NH(4)Cl. This indicates that the iron reduced from holo-transferrin at the plasma membrane accounts for at least 50?% of the iron uptake observed. hBMVEC-dependent reduction and uptake of NTBI utilizes a Pt(II)-insensitive reductase. Reductase-independent uptake of Fe(II) by hBMVEC is inhibited up to 50?% by Zn(II) and/or Mn(II) by a saturable process suggesting that redundant Fe(II) transporters exist in the hBMVEC plasma membrane. These results are the first to demonstrate multiple mechanism(s) of TBI and NTBI reduction and uptake by endothelial cells (EC) of the BBB.
PubMedId: 22434419
Journal-article: BioMetals, vol. 25, pp. 665-675, 2012
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: Aerobes and anaerobes alike express a plethora of essential iron enzymes; in the resting state, the iron atom(s) in these proteins are in the ferrous state. For aerobes, ferric iron is the predominant environmental valence form which, given ferric iron's aqueous chemistry, occurs as 'rust', insoluble, bio-inert polymeric ferric oxide that results from the hydrolysis of [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+). Mobilizing this iron requires bio-ferrireduction which in turn requires managing the rapid autoxidation of the resulting Fe(II) which occurs at pH > 6. This review examines the aqueous redox chemistry of iron and the mechanisms evolved in aerobes to suppress the 'rusting out' of Fe(III) and the ROS-generating autoxidation of Fe(II) so as to make this metal ion available as the most ubiquitous prosthetic group in metallobiology.
PubMedId: 23264695
Journal-article: Coordination chemistry reviews, vol. 257, 2012
Authors: Christopher S. Stoj, Daniel J. Kosman
Reference-entry: Encyclopedia of Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry, 2011
Authors: Lynn Ziegler, Alaina Terzulli, Ruchi Gaur, Ryan McCarthy, Daniel J. Kosman
Abstract: Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses two proteins that together support high-affinity Fe-uptake. These are a multicopper oxidase, Fet3p, with specificity towards Fe and a ferric iron permease, Ftr1p, which supports Fe-accumulation. Homologues of the genes encoding these two proteins are found in all fungal genomes including those for the pathogens, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. At least one of these loci represents a virulence factor for each pathogen suggesting that this complex would be an appropriate pharmacologic target. However, the mechanism by which this protein pair supports Fe-uptake in any fungal pathogen has not been elucidated. Taking advantage of the robust molecular genetics available in S. cerevisiae, we identify the two of five candidate ferroxidases likely involved in high-affinity Fe-uptake in C. albicans, Fet31 and Fet34. Both localize to the yeast plasma membrane and both support Fe-uptake along with an Ftr1 protein, either from C. albicans or from S. cerevisiae. We express and characterize Fet34, demonstrating that it is functionally homologous to ScFet3p. Using S. cerevisiae as host for the functional expression of the C. albicans Fe-uptake proteins, we demonstrate that they support a mechanism of Fe-trafficking that involves channelling of the CaFet34-generated Fe directly to CaFtr1 for transport into the cytoplasm.
PubMedId: 21645130
Journal-article: Molecular Microbiology, vol. 81, pp. 473-485, 2011
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
PubMedId: 21769093
Journal-article: Nature chemical biology, vol. 7, 2011
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: The steady-state is a fundamental aspect of biochemical pathways in cells; indeed, the concept of steady-state is a definition of life itself. In a simple enzyme kinetic scheme, the steady-state condition is easy to define analytically but experimentally often difficult to capture because of its evanescent quality; the initial, constant velocity condition that signifies the steady-state of the E(f) and ES system is often short-lived. The recording of electrophysiologic events through a receptor channel is used here to illustrate the steady-state and to introduce the single-molecule approach to the quantification of biologic kinetic schemes. This article first briefly reviews the Michaelis-Menten and Briggs-Haldane formulations for the simple enzyme kinetic scheme. The salient structural features of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid) receptor are introduced as is the single NMDA molecule patch-clamp method; this is a high-resolution method for recording charge (ion) transfer through this and other ionotropic (ion-conducting) receptors. The concept of a time constant is related directly to a rate constant in showing that durations of channel opening and closing directly provide values for the rate constants that link the various conformation states adopted by the receptor when it is at a steady state. These rate constants provide the basis for illustrating the energy relationships between the multiple protein conformation states that the receptor populates during steady-state ion conduction across the cell membrane. The article emphasizes the advantages of collecting the mean behavior of a single molecule over time in comparison to the mean behavior of a large collection of independent molecules at a single time point.
PubMedId: 21567767
Journal-article: Biochemistry and molecular biology education : a bimonthly publication of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, vol. 37, 2011
Authors: Lynn Ziegler, Alaina Terzulli, Erik Sedlak, Daniel J. Kosman
Abstract: Glycosylation is essential to the maintenance of protein quality in the vesicular protein trafficking pathway in eukaryotic cells. Using the yeast multicopper oxidase, Fet3p, the hypothesis is tested that core glycosylation suppresses Fet3p nascent chain aggregation during synthesis into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Fet3p has 11 crystallographically mapped N-linked core glycan units. Assembly of four of these units is specifically required for localization of Fet3p to the plasma membrane (PM). Fet3 protein lacking any one of these glycan units is found in an intracellular high-molecular mass species resolvable by blue native gel electrophoresis. Individually, the remaining glycan moieties are not required for ER exit; however, serial deletion of these by N A substitution correlates with these desglycan species failure to exit the ER. Desglycan Fet3 proteins that localize to the PM are wild type in function indicating that the missing carbohydrate is not required for native structure and biologic activity. This native function includes the interaction with the iron permease, Ftr1p, and wild type high-affinity iron uptake activity. The four essential sequons are found within relatively nonpolar regions located in surface recesses and are strongly conserved among fungal Fet3 proteins. The remaining N-linked sites are found in more surface exposed, less nonpolar environments, and their conservation is weak or absent. The data indicate that in Fet3p the N-linked glycan has little effect on the enzyme's molecular activity but is critical to its cellular activity by maximizing the protein's exit from the ER and assembly into a functional iron uptake complex.
PubMedId: 20662012
Journal-article: Protein Science, vol. 19, pp. 1739-1750, 2010
Authors: Anthony J. Augustine, Christian Kjaergaard, Munzarin Qayyum, Lynn Ziegler, Daniel J. Kosman, Keith O. Hodgson, Britt Hedman, Edward I. Solomon
Abstract: The multicopper oxidase Fet3p catalyzes the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water, coupled to the one-electron oxidation of four equivalents of substrate. To carry out this process, the enzyme utilizes four Cu atoms: a type 1, a type 2, and a coupled binuclear, type 3 site. Substrates are oxidized at the T1 Cu, which rapidly transfers electrons, 13 A away, to a trinuclear copper cluster composed of the T2 and T3 sites, where dioxygen is reduced to water in two sequential 2e(-) steps. This study focuses on two variants of Fet3p, H126Q and H483Q, that perturb the two T3 Cu's, T3alpha and T3beta, respectively. The variants have been isolated in both holo and type 1 depleted (T1D) forms, T1DT3alphaQ and T1DT3betaQ, and their trinuclear copper clusters have been characterized in their oxidized and reduced states. While the variants are only mildly perturbed relative to T1D in the resting oxidized state, in contrast to T1D they are both found to have lost a ligand in their reduced states. Importantly, T1DT3alphaQ reacts with O(2), but T1DT3betaQ does not. Thus loss of a ligand at T3beta, but not at T3alpha, turns off O(2) reactivity, indicating that T3beta and T2 are required for the 2e(-) reduction of O(2) to form the peroxide intermediate (PI), whereas T3alpha remains reduced. This is supported by the spectroscopic features of PI in T1DT3alphaQ, which are identical to T1D PI. This selective redox activity of one edge of the trinuclear cluster demonstrates its asymmetry in O(2) reactivity. The structural origin of this asymmetry between the T3alpha and T3beta is discussed, as is its contribution to reactivity.
PubMedId: 20377263
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, pp. 6057-6067, 2010
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: Aerobic organisms are faced with a dilemma. Environmental iron is found primarily in the relatively inert Fe(III) form, whereas the more metabolically active ferrous form is a strong pro-oxidant. This conundrum is solved by the redox cycling of iron between Fe(III) and Fe(II) at every step in the iron metabolic pathway. As a transition metal ion, iron can be "metabolized" only by this redox cycling, which is catalyzed in aerobes by the coupled activities of ferric iron reductases (ferrireductases) and ferrous iron oxidases (ferroxidases).
PubMedId: 20522542
Journal-article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 285, 2010
Authors: Alaina Terzulli, Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: Multicopper ferroxidases play a vital role in iron metabolism in bacteria, fungi, algae, and mammals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizes a channeling mechanism to couple the ferroxidase activity of Fet3p to Fe(3+) transport into the cell by Ftr1p. In contrast, the mechanisms by which mammals couple the ferroxidase reaction to iron trafficking is unclear. The human ferroxidases ceruloplasmin and hephaestin are twice the size of Fet3p and interact with proteins that are not expressed in fungi. Chlamydomonas FOX1 is a homolog of the human ferroxidases but likely supports iron uptake in a manner similar to that of yeast, since Chlamydomonas reinhardtii expresses a ferric iron permease homolog, FTR1. The results presented support this hypothesis. We show that FOX1 is trafficked to the plasma membrane and is oriented with its multicopper oxidase/ferroxidase domain in the exocytoplasmic space. Our analysis of FTR1 indicates its topology is similar to that of S. cerevisiae Ftr1p, with a potential exocytoplasmic iron channeling motif and two potential iron permeation motifs in membrane-spanning regions. We demonstrate that high-affinity iron uptake is dependent on FOX1 and the copper status of the cell. Kinetic inhibition of high-affinity iron uptake by a ferric iron chelator does not reflect the strength of the chelator, supporting a ferric iron channeling mechanism for high-affinity iron uptake in Chlamydomonas. Last, recombinant FOX1 (rFOX1) has been isolated in a partially holo form that exhibits the UV-visible absorbance spectrum of a multicopper oxidase and the catalytic activity of a ferroxidase.
PubMedId: 20348389
Journal-article: Eukaryotic cell, vol. 9, 2010
Authors: Mar?a-Eugenia Zaballa, Lynn Ziegler, Daniel J Kosman, Alejandro J Vila
PubMedId: 20698686
Journal Article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, 2010
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are unique among copper proteins in that they contain at least one each of the three types of biologic copper sites, type 1, type 2, and the binuclear type 3. MCOs are descended from the family of small blue copper proteins (cupredoxins) that likely arose as a complement to the heme-iron-based cytochromes involved in electron transport; this event corresponded to the aerobiosis of the biosphere that resulted in the conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) as the predominant redox state of this essential metal and the solubilization of copper from Cu(2)S to Cu(H(2)O)( n ) (2+). MCOs are encoded in genomes in all three kingdoms and play essential roles in the physiology of essentially all aerobes. With four redox-active copper centers, MCOs share with terminal copper-heme oxidases the ability to catalyze the four-electron reduction of O(2) to two molecules of water. The electron transfers associated with this reaction are both outer and inner sphere in nature and their mechanisms have been fairly well established. A subset of MCO proteins exhibit specificity for Fe(2+), Cu(+), and/or Mn(2+) as reducing substrates and have been designated as metallooxidases. These enzymes, in particular the ferroxidases found in all fungi and metazoans, play critical roles in the metal metabolism of the expressing organism.
PubMedId: 19816718
Journal-article: Journal of biological inorganic chemistry : JBIC : a publication of the Society of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, vol. 15, 2009
Authors: Anthony J. Augustine, Mads Emil Kragh, Ritimukta Sarangi, Satoshi Fujii, Barry D. Liboiron, Christopher S. Stoj, Daniel J. Kosman, Keith O. Hodgson, Britt Hedman, Edward I. Solomon
Abstract: The multicopper oxidases catalyze the 4e- reduction of O2 to H2O coupled to the 1e- oxidation of 4 equiv of substrate. This activity requires four Cu atoms, including T1, T2, and coupled binuclear T3 sites. The T2 and T3 sites form a trinuclear cluster (TNC) where O2 is reduced. The T1 is coupled to the TNC through a T1-Cys-His-T3 electron transfer (ET) pathway. In this study the two T3 Cu coordinating His residues which lie in this pathway in Fet3 have been mutated, H483Q, H483C, H485Q, and H485C, to study how perturbation at the TNC impacts the T1 Cu site. Spectroscopic methods, in particular resonance Raman (rR), show that the change from His to Gln to Cys increases the covalency of the T1 Cu-S Cys bond and decreases its redox potential. This study of T1-TNC interactions is then extended to Rhus vernicifera laccase where a number of well-defined species including the catalytically relevant native intermediate (NI) can be trapped for spectroscopic study. The T1 Cu-S covalency and potential do not change in these species relative to resting oxidized enzyme, but interestingly the differences in the structure of the TNC in these species do lead to changes in the T1 Cu rR spectrum. This helps to confirm that vibrations in the cysteine side chain of the T1 Cu site and the protein backbone couple to the Cu-S vibration. These changes in the side chain and backbone provide a possible mechanism for regulating intramolecular T1 to TNC ET in NI and partially reduced enzyme forms for efficient turnover.
PubMedId: 18197705
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 47, pp. 2036-2045, 2008
Authors: Alaina J. Terzulli, Daniel J. Kosman
Abstract: Multicopper oxidases (MCO) contain at least four copper atoms arrayed in three distinct ligand fields supported by two canonical structural features: (1) multiples of the cupredoxin fold and (2) four unique sequence elements that include the ten histidine and one cysteine ligands to the four copper atoms. Ferroxidases are a subfamily of MCO proteins that contain residues supporting a specific reactivity towards ferrous iron; these MCOs play a vital role in iron metabolism in bacteria, algae, fungi, and mammals. In contrast to the fungal ferroxidases, e.g., Fet3p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mammalian ceruloplasmin (Cp) is twice as large (six vs. three cupredoxin domains) and contains three type 1, or "blue," copper sites. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii expresses a putative ferroxidase, Fox1, which has sequence similarity to human Cp (hCp). Eschewing the standard sequence-based modeling paradigm, we have constructed a function-based model of the Fox1 protein which replicates hCp's six copper-site ligand arrays with an overall root mean square deviation of 1.4 A. Analysis of this model has led also to assignment of motifs in Fox1 that are unique to ferroxidases, the strongest evidence to date that the well-characterized fungal high-affinity iron uptake system is essential to iron homeostasis in green algae. The model of Fox1 also establishes a subfamily of MCO proteins with a noncanonical copper-ligand organization. These diverse structures suggest alternative mechanisms for intramolecular electron transfer and require a new trajectory for the evolution of the MCO superfamily.
PubMedId: 19023602
Journal-article: JBIC Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, vol. 14, pp. 315-325, 2008
Authors: Won Hee Jung, Anita Sham, Tianshun Lian, Arvinder Singh, Daniel J. Kosman, James W. Kronstad
Abstract: The level of available iron in the mammalian host is extremely low, and pathogenic microbes must compete with host proteins such as transferrin for iron. Iron regulation of gene expression, including genes encoding iron uptake functions and virulence factors, is critical for the pathogenesis of the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study, we characterized the roles of the CFT1 and CFT2 genes that encode C. neoformans orthologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-affinity iron permease FTR1. Deletion of CFT1 reduced growth and iron uptake with ferric chloride and holo-transferrin as the in vitro iron sources, and the cft1 mutant was attenuated for virulence in a mouse model of infection. A reduction in the fungal burden in the brains of mice infected with the cft1 mutant was observed, thus suggesting a requirement for reductive iron acquisition during cryptococcal meningitis. CFT2 played no apparent role in iron acquisition but did influence virulence. The expression of both CFT1 and CFT2 was influenced by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and the iron-regulatory transcription factor Cir1 positively regulated CFT1 and negatively regulated CFT2. Overall, these results indicate that C. neoformans utilizes iron sources within the host (e.g., holo-transferrin) that require Cft1 and a reductive iron uptake system.
PubMedId: 18282105
Journal-article: PLoS Pathogens, vol. 4, pp. e45, 2008
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: Outersphere electron transfer in multicopper oxidases occurs at the type 1, blue Cu(II). One class of MCO proteins exhibits a specificity in this reaction towards Fe(II). In work carried out in collaboration with the Solomon lab over the past 7 years, we have delineated the structural motifs that support this ferroxidase specificity and have quantified the contributions that each makes to this outersphere electron transfer reaction from Fe(II) to the type 1 Cu(II). Two features of this electron transfer catalysis stand out. First, the protein provides a binding site for Fe(II) that actually favors Fe(III); this coordination sphere places the bound Fe(II) in a state of "entasis" that can be relieved by loss of an electron. In short, the E(O) of the bound Fe(II) is lowered relative to that of aqueous ferrous iron making electron transfer thermodynamically favorable. Second, carboxylates within this coordination sphere provide an electronic coupling pathway for the electron transfer via their H-bond network with type 1 Cu histidine ligands thus making electron transfer kinetically efficient. This brief report breaks down these contributions to ferroxidase specificity in terms of the semi-classical Marcus equation describing outersphere electron transfer.
PubMedId: 18443651
Journal-article: Inorganica chimica acta, vol. 361, 2008
Authors: Liliana Quintanar, Christopher Stoj, Alexander B. Taylor, P. John Hart, Daniel J. Kosman, Edward I. Solomon
Journal-article: ChemInform, vol. 38, 2007
Authors: Liliana Quintanar, Christopher Stoj, Alexander B. Taylor, P. John Hart, Daniel J. Kosman, Edward I. Solomon
Abstract: Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are encoded in the genomes of Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archea. These proteins are unique in that they contain at least four Cu atom prosthetic groups organized into one each of the three spectral classifications of copper sites in biology: type 1 (T1), type 2 (T2), and binuclear type 3 (T3), where the T2 and T3 sites form a trinuclear Cu cluster. With these four redox-active copper sites, the multicopper oxidases catalyze the four-electron (4e(-)) reduction of dioxygen to 2H2O, an activity that they alone share with the terminal heme-containing oxidases. Most MCOs exhibit broad specificity towards organic reductants, while a relatively small number of family members exhibit equally robust activity towards metal ions like Fe(II), Cu(I), and Mn(II) and, thus, are considered metallo-oxidases. This Account analyzes the structure-activity features of multicopper oxidases that determine their relative substrate specificity. Since the substrate oxidation step involves an outer-sphere electron transfer from the reductant to the T1Cu site in the protein, the concepts of Marcus theory are applied to unravel the origin of the substrate specificity of the multicopper ferroxidases.
PubMedId: 17425282
Journal-article: Accounts of Chemical Research, vol. 40, pp. 445-452, 2007
Authors: Christopher S. Stoj, Anthony J. Augustine, Edward I. Solomon, Daniel J. Kosman
Abstract: The Fet3 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a multicopper oxidase with specificity toward Fe(II) and Cu(I). Fet3p turnover of Fe(II) supports high affinity iron uptake across the yeast plasma membrane, whereas its turnover of Cu(I) contributes to copper resistance in yeast. The structure of Fet3p has been used to identify possible amino acid residues responsible for this protein's reactivity with Cu(I), and structure-function analyses have confirmed this assignment. Fet3p Met(345) is required for the enzyme's reactivity toward Cu(I). Although the Fet3pM345A mutant exhibits wild type spectral and electrochemical behavior, the kinetic constants for Cu(I) turnover and for single-turnover electron transfer from Cu(I) to the enzyme are significantly reduced. The specificity constant with Cu(I) as substrate is reduced by one-fifth, whereas the electron transfer rate from Cu(I) is reduced 50-fold. This mutation has little effect on the reactivity toward Fe(II), indicating that Met(345) contributes specifically to Fet3p reactivity with the cuprous ion. These kinetic defects render the Fet3pM345A unable to support wild type cellular copper resistance, suggesting that there is a finely tuned copper redox balance at the yeast plasma membrane.
PubMedId: 17220296
Journal-article: Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 282, pp. 7862-7868, 2007
Authors: Anthony J Augustine, Liliana Quintanar, Christopher S Stoj, Daniel J Kosman, Edward I Solomon
Abstract: The multicopper oxidase Fet3p couples four 1e(-) oxidations of substrate to the 4e(-) reduction of O2 to H2O. Fet3p uses four Cu atoms to accomplish this reaction: the type 1, type 2, and coupled binuclear type 3 sites. The type 2 and type 3 sites together form a trinuclear Cu cluster (TNC) which is the site of O2 reduction. This study focuses on mutants of two residues, E487 and D94, which lie in the second coordination sphere of the TNC and defines the role that each plays in the structural integrity of the TNC, its reactivity with O2, and in the directional movement of protons during reductive cleavage of the O-O bond. The E487D, E487A, and D94E mutants have been studied in the holo and type 1 depleted (T1D) forms. Residue E487, located near the T3 center, is found to be responsible for donation of a proton during the reductive cleavage of the O-O bond in the peroxide intermediate and an inverse kinetic solvent isotope effect, which indicates that this proton is already transferred when the O-O bond is cleaved. Residue D94, near the T2 site, plays a key role in the reaction of the reduced TNC with O2 and drives electron transfer from the T2 Cu to cleave the O-O bond by deprotonating the T2 Cu water ligand. A mechanism is developed where these second sphere residues participate in the proton assisted reductive cleavage of the O-O bond at the TNC.
PubMedId: 17918838
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 129, 2007
Authors: Arvinder Singh, Navjot Kaur, Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: The yeast vacuole is the storage depot for cellular iron. In this report we quantify the import-export balance in the vacuole because of the import of iron by Ccc1p and to export by the combined activity of Smf3p and the ferroxidase, permease pair of proteins, Fet5p and Fth1p. Our data indicate that the two efflux pathways are equally efficient in trafficking iron out of the vacuole. A major focus of this work was to identify the ferrireductase(s) that supplies the Fe(II) for efflux whether by Smf3p or the Fet5p-Fth1p complex. Using a combination of flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry to quantify vacuolar and whole cell iron content and a reporter assay for cytoplasmic iron we demonstrate that Fre6p supplies Fe(II) to both efflux systems, while Fre7p plays no role in Fe-efflux from the vacuole. Enzymatic assay shows the two fusions to have similar reductase activity, however. Confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that Fre6:GFP localizes to the vacuolar membrane; in contrast, Fre7:GFP fusions exhibit a variable and diffuse cellular distribution. Demonstrating a role for a vacuolar metalloreductase in Fe-efflux supports the model that iron is stored in the vacuole in the ferric state.
PubMedId: 17681937
Journal-article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 282, 2007
Authors: E.Y. Kwok, C.S. Stoj, S. Severance, D.J. Kosman
Abstract: High affinity iron uptake in fungi is supported by a plasma membrane protein complex that includes a multicopper ferroxidase enzyme and a ferric iron permease. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this complex is composed of the ferroxidase Fet3p and the permease Ftr1p. Fe(II) serves as substrate for Fe-uptake by being substrate for Fet3p; the resulting Fet3p-produced Fe(III) is then transported across the membrane via Ftr1p. A model of metabolite channeling of this Fe(III) is tested here by first constructing and kinetically characterizing in Fe-uptake two Fet3p-Ftr1p chimeras in which the multicopper oxidase/ferroxidase domain of Fet3p has been fused to the Ftr1p iron permease. Although the bifunctional chimeras are as kinetically efficient in Fe-uptake as is the wild type two-component system, they lack the adaptability and fidelity in Fe-uptake of the wild type. Specifically, Fe-uptake through the Fet3p, Ftr1p complex is insensitive to a potential Fe(III) trapping agent - citrate - whereas Fe-uptake via the chimeric proteins is competitively inhibited by this Fe(III) chelator. This inhibition does not appear to be due to scavenging Fet3p-produced Fe(III) that is in equilibrium with bulk solvent but could be due to leakiness to citrate found in the bifunctional but not the two-component system. The data are consistent with a channeling model of Fe-trafficking in the Fet3p, Ftr1p complex and suggest that in this system, Fet3p serves as a redox sieve that presents Fe(III) specifically for permeation through Ftr1p.
PubMedId: 16387364
Journal-article: Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, vol. 100, pp. 1053-1060, 2006
Authors: Ernest Y. Kwok, Scott Severance, Daniel J. Kosman
Abstract: In high-affinity iron uptake in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III) by the multicopper oxidase, Fet3p, and the Fe(III) produced is transported into the cell via the iron permease, Ftr1p. These two proteins are likely part of a heterodimeric or higher order complex in the yeast plasma membrane. We provide kinetic evidence that the Fet3p-produced Fe(III) is trafficked to Ftr1p for permeation by a classic metabolite channeling mechanism. We examine the (59)Fe uptake kinetics for a number of complexes containing mutant forms of both Fet3p and Ftr1p and demonstrate that a residue in one protein interacts with one in the other protein along the iron trafficking pathway as would be expected in a channeling process. We show that, as a result of some of these mutations, iron trafficking becomes sensitive to an added Fe(III) chelator that inhibits uptake in a strictly competitive manner. This inhibition is not strongly dependent on the chelator strength, however, suggesting that Fe(III) dissociation from the iron uptake complex, if it occurs, is kinetically slow relative to iron permeation. Metabolite channeling is a common feature of multifunctional enzymes. We constructed the analogous ferroxidase, permease chimera and demonstrate that it supports iron uptake with a kinetic pattern consistent with a channeling mechanism. By analogy to the Fe(III) trafficking that leads to the mineralization of the ferritin core, we propose that ferric iron channeling is a conserved feature of iron homeostasis in aerobic organisms.
PubMedId: 16700543
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 45, pp. 6317-6327, 2006
Authors: Christopher S. Stoj, Daniel J. Kosman
Reference-entry: Encyclopedia of Inorganic Chemistry, 2006
Authors: Christopher S Stoj, Anthony J Augustine, Lynn Zeigler, Edward I Solomon, Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: Fet3p is a multicopper oxidase (MCO) that functions together with the iron permease, Ftr1p, to support high-affinity Fe uptake in yeast. Fet3p is a ferroxidase that, like ceruloplasmin and hephaestin, couples the oxidation of 4 equiv of Fe(II) to the reduction of O2 to 2 H2O. The ferrous iron specificity of this subclass of MCO proteins has not been delineated by rigorous structure-function analysis. Here the crystal structure of Fet3p has been used as a template to identify the amino acid residues that confer this substrate specificity and then to quantify the contributions they make to this specific reactivity by thermodynamic and kinetic analyses. In terms of the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer, we show here that D283, E185, and D409 in Fet3p provide a Fe(II) binding site that actually favors ferric iron; this site thus reduces the reduction potential of the bound Fe(II) in comparison to that of aqueous ferrous iron, providing a thermodynamically more robust driving force for electron transfer. In addition, E185 and D409 constitute parts of the electron-transfer pathway from the bound Fe(II) to the protein's type 1 Cu(II). This electronic matrix coupling relies on H-bonds from the carboxylate OD2 atom of each residue to the NE2 NH group of the two histidine ligands at the type 1 Cu site. These two acidic residues and this H-bond network appear to distinguish a fungal ferroxidase from a fungal laccase since the specificity that Fet3p has for Fe(II) is completely lost in a Fet3pE185A/D409A mutant. Indeed, this double mutant functions kinetically better as a laccase, albeit a relatively inefficient one.
PubMedId: 17042492
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 45, 2006
Authors: Arvinder Singh, Scott Severance, Navjot Kaur, William Wiltsie, Daniel J Kosman
Abstract: The high affinity iron uptake complex in the yeast plasma membrane (PM) consists of the ferroxidase, Fet3p, and the ferric iron permease, Ftr1p. We used a combination of yeast two-hybrid analysis, confocal fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) quantification to delineate the motifs in the two proteins required for assembly and maturation into an uptake-competent complex. The cytoplasmic, carboxyl-terminal domain of each protein contains a four-residue motif adjacent to the cytoplasm-PM interface that supports an interaction between the proteins. This interaction has been quantified by two-hybrid analysis and is required for assembly and trafficking of the complex to the PM and for the approximately 13% maximum FRET efficiency determined. In contrast, the Fet3p transmembrane domain (TM) can be exchanged with the TM domain from the vacuolar ferroxidase, Fet5p, with no loss of assembly and trafficking. A carboxyl-terminal interaction between the vacuolar proteins, Fet5p and Fth1p, also was quantified. As a measure of the specificity of interaction, no interaction between heterologous ferroxidase permease pairs was observed. Also, whereas FRET was quantified between fluorescent fusions of the copper permease (monomers), Ctr1p, none was observed between Fet3p and Ctr1p. The results are consistent with a (minimal) heterodimer model of the Fet3p.Ftr1p complex that supports the trafficking of iron from Fet3p to Ftr1p for iron permeation across the yeast PM.
PubMedId: 16522632
Journal-article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 281, 2006
Authors: Ernest Kwok, Daniel Kosman
Book-chapter: Topics in Current Genetics, pp. 59-99, 2005
Authors: Liliana Quintanar, Christopher Stoj, Tzu-Pin Wang, Daniel J. Kosman, Edward I. Solomon
Abstract: Fet3p is a multicopper oxidase that contains four Cu ions: one type 1, one type 2, and a coupled binuclear type 3 site. The type 2 and type 3 centers form a trinuclear cluster that is the active site for O(2) reduction to H(2)O. When the type 1 Cu is depleted (C484S mutation), the reaction of the reduced trinuclear cluster with O(2) generates a peroxide intermediate. Kinetic studies of the decay of the peroxide intermediate suggest that a carboxyl residue (D94 in Fet3p) assists the reductive cleavage of the O-O bond at low pH. Mutations at the D94 residue (D94A, D94N, and D94E) have been studied to evaluate its role in the decay of the peroxide intermediate. Spectroscopic studies show that the D94 mutations affect the geometric and electronic structure of the trinuclear cluster in a way that is consistent with the hydrogen bond connectivity of D94. While the D94E mutation does not affect the initial reaction of the cluster with O(2), the D94A mutation causes larger structural changes that render the trinuclear cluster unreactive toward O(2), demonstrating a structural role for the D94 residue. The decay of the peroxide intermediate is markedly affected by the D94E mutation, confirming the involvement of D94 in this reaction. The D94 residue appears to activate a proton of the type 2 Cu(+)-bound water for participation in the transition state. These studies provide new insight into the role of D94 and proton involvement in the reductive cleavage of the O-O bond.
PubMedId: 15835897
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 44, pp. 6081-6091, 2005
Authors: Alexander B Taylor, Christopher S Stoj, Lynn Ziegler, Daniel J Kosman, P John Hart
Abstract: Fet3p is a multicopper-containing glycoprotein localized to the yeast plasma membrane that catalyzes the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). This ferrous iron oxidation is coupled to the reduction of O(2) to H(2)O and is termed the ferroxidase reaction. Fet3p-produced Fe(III) is transferred to the permease Ftr1p for import into the cytosol. The posttranslational insertion of four copper ions into Fet3p is essential for its activity, thus linking copper and iron homeostasis. The mammalian ferroxidases ceruloplasmin and hephaestin are homologs of Fet3p. Loss of the Fe(II) oxidation catalyzed by these proteins results in a spectrum of pathological states, including death. Here, we present the structure of the Fet3p extracellular ferroxidase domain and compare it with that of human ceruloplasmin and other multicopper oxidases that are devoid of ferroxidase activity. The Fet3p structure delineates features that underlie the unique reactivity of this and homologous multicopper oxidases that support the essential trafficking of iron in diverse eukaryotic organisms. The findings are correlated with biochemical and physiological data to cross-validate the elements of Fet3p that define it as both a ferroxidase and cuprous oxidase.
PubMedId: 16230618
Journal-article: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 102, 2005
Authors: Scott SEVERANCE, Satadipta CHAKRABORTY, Daniel J. KOSMAN
Abstract: Ftr1p is the permease component of the Fet3p-Ftr1p high affinity iron-uptake complex, in the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that transports the Fe3+ produced by the Fet3p ferroxidase into the cell. In this study we show that Ftr1p probably has seven transmembrane domains with an orientation of N-terminal outside, and C-terminal inside the cell. Within the context of this topology of the Fet3p-Ftr1p complex, we have identified several sequence elements in Ftr1p that are required for wild-type uptake function. First to be identified were two REXLE (Arg-Glu-Xaa-Leu-Glu) motifs in transmembrane domains 1 and 4. Alanine substitutions at any one of these combined six arginine or glutamic acid residues inactivated Ftr1p in iron uptake, indicating that both motifs were essential to iron permeation. R-->K and E-->D substitutions in these two motifs led to a variable loss of activity, suggesting that while all six residues were essential, their contributions to uptake were quantitatively and/or mechanistically distinct. The terminal glutamate in an EDLWE89 element, associated with transmembrane domain 3, and a DASE motif, located in extracellular loop 6, were also required. The double substitution to AASA in the latter, inactivated Ftr1p in iron uptake while the Ftr1p(E89A) mutant had only 20% of wild-type activity. The two REXLE and the EDLWE and DASE motifs are strongly conserved among fungal Ftr1p homologues, suggesting that these motifs are essential to iron permeation. Finally another important residue, Ile369, was identified in the Ftr1p cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. Deletion or substitution of this residue led to a 70% loss of iron-uptake activity. Ile369 was the only residue identified in this domain that made such a major contribution to iron uptake by the Fet3p-Ftr1p complex.
PubMedId: 14992688
Journal-article: Biochemical Journal, vol. 380, pp. 487-496, 2004
Authors: Liliana Quintanar, Mark Gebhard, Tzu-Pin Wang, Daniel J. Kosman, Edward I. Solomon
Abstract: The multicopper oxidases are a family of enzymes that couple the reduction of O(2) to H(2)O with the oxidation of a range of substrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fet3p and human ceruloplasmin (hCp) are members of this family that exhibit ferroxidase activity. Their high specificity for Fe(II) has been attributed to the existence of a binding site for iron. In this study, mutations at the E185 and Y354 residues, which are putative ligands for iron in Fet3p, have been generated and characterized. The effects of these mutations on the electronic structure of the T1 Cu site have been assessed, and the reactivities of this site toward 1,4-hydroquinone (a weak binding substrate) and Fe(II) have been evaluated and interpreted in terms of the semiclassical Marcus theory for electron transfer. The electronic and geometric structure of the Fe(II) substrate bound to Fet3p and hCp has been studied for the first time, using variable-temperature variable field magnetic circular dichroism (VTVH MCD) spectroscopy. The iron binding sites in Fet3p and hCp appear to be very similar in nature, and their contributions to the ferroxidase activity of these proteins have been analyzed. It is found that these iron binding sites play a major role in tuning the reduction potential of iron to provide a large driving force for the ferroxidase reaction, while still supporting the delivery of the Fe(III) product to the acceptor protein. Finally, the analysis of possible electron-transfer (ET) pathways from the protein-bound Fe(II) to the T1 Cu site indicates that the E185 residue not only plays a role in iron binding, but also provides the dominant ET pathway to the T1 Cu site.
PubMedId: 15161286
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 126, pp. 6579-6589, 2004
Authors: Christopher Stoj, Daniel J Kosman
Journal-article: FEBS Letters, vol. 554, pp. 422-426, 2003
Authors: Tzu-Pin Wang, Liliana Quintanar, Scott Severance, Edward I. Solomon, Daniel J. Kosman
Abstract: The Fet3 protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a multicopper oxidase tethered to the outer surface of the yeast plasma membrane. Fet3p catalyzes the oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+); this ferroxidation reaction is an obligatory first step in high-affinity iron uptake through the permease Ftr1p. Here, kinetic analyses of several Fet3p mutants identify residues that contribute to the specificity that Fet3p has for Fe(2+), one of which is essential also to the coupling of the ferroxidase and uptake processes. The spectral and kinetic properties of the D278A, E185D and A, Y354F and A, and E185A/Y354A mutants of a soluble form of Fet3p showed that all of the mutants exhibited the normal absorbance at 330 nm and 608 nm due to the type 3 and type 1 copper sites in Fet3p, respectively. The EPR spectra of the mutants were also equivalent to wild-type, showing that the type 1 and type 2 Cu(II) sites in the proteins were not perturbed. The only marked kinetic defects measured in vitro were increases in K(M) for Fe(2+) exhibited by the D278A, E185A, Y354A, and E185A/Y354A mutants. These results suggest that these three residues contribute to the ferroxidase specificity site in Fet3p. In vivo analysis of these mutant proteins in their membrane-bound form showed that only E185 mutants exhibited kinetic defects in (59)Fe uptake. For the Fet3p(E185D) mutant, K(M) for iron was 300-fold greater than the wild-type K(M), while Fet3p(E185A) was completely inactive in support of iron uptake. In situ fluorescence demonstrated that all of the mutant Fet3 proteins, in complex with an Ftr1p:YFP fusion protein, were trafficked normally to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that E185 contributes to Fe(2+ )binding to Fet3p and to the subsequent trafficking of the Fe(3+) produced to Ftr1p.
PubMedId: 12684851
Journal-article: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, vol. 8, pp. 611-620, 2003
Authors: Xiaoli Shi, Christopher Stoj, Annette Romeo, Daniel J Kosman, Zhiwu Zhu
Abstract: Fre1p is a metalloreductase in the yeast plasma membrane that is essential to uptake of environmental Cu2+ and Fe3+. Fet3p is a multicopper oxidase in this membrane essential for high affinity iron uptake. In the uptake of Fe3+, Fre1p produces Fe2+ that is a substrate for Fet3p; the Fe3+ produced by Fet3p is a ligand for the iron permease, Ftr1p. Deletion of FET3 leads to iron deficiency; this deletion also causes a copper sensitivity not seen in wild type. Deletion of FTR1 leads to copper sensitivity also. Production in the ftr1delta strain of an iron-uptake negative Ftr1p mutant, Ftr1p(RAGLA), suppressed this copper sensitivity. This Ftr1p mutant supported the plasma membrane targeting of active Fet3p that is blocked in the parental ftr1delta strain. A ferroxidase-negative Fet3p did not suppress the copper sensitivity in a fet3delta strain, although it supported the plasma membrane localization of the Fet3p.Ftr1p complex. Thus, loss of membrane-associated Fet3p oxidase activity correlated with copper sensitivity. Furthermore, in vitro Cu1+ was shown to be an excellent substrate for Fet3p. Last, the copper sensitivity of the fet3delta strain was suppressed by co-deletion of FRE1, suggesting that the cytotoxic species was Cu1+. In contrast, deletion of CTR1 or of FET4 did not suppress the copper sensitivity in the fet3delta strain; these genes encode the two major copper transporters in laboratory yeast strains. This result indicated that the apparent cuprous ion toxicity was not due to excess intracellular copper. These biochemical and physiologic results indicate that at least with respect to cuprous and ferrous ions, Fet3p can be considered a metallo-oxidase and appears to play an essential role in both iron and copper homeostasis in yeast. Its functional homologs, e.g. ceruloplasmin and hephaestin, could play a similar role in mammals.
PubMedId: 12954629
Journal-article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 278, 2003
Authors: Christopher Stoj, Daniel J Kosman
PubMedId: 14623105
Journal Article: FEBS letters, vol. 554, 2003
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Molecular Microbiology, vol. 47, pp. 1185-1197, 2003
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
PubMedId: 12603727
Journal Article: Molecular microbiology, vol. 47, 2003
Authors: Amy E. Palmer, Liliana Quintanar, Scott Severance, Tzu-Pin Wang, Daniel J. Kosman, Edward I. Solomon
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 41, pp. 6438-6448, 2002
Authors: Amy E Palmer, Liliana Quintanar, Scott Severance, Tzu-Pin Wang, Daniel J Kosman, Edward I Solomon
PubMedId: 12009907
Journal Article: Biochemistry, vol. 41, 2002
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman
Book-chapter: Copper-Containing Proteins, pp. 221-269, 2002
Authors: Daniel J Kosman
PubMedId: 12418179
Journal Article: Advances in protein chemistry, vol. 60, 2002
Authors: Timothy E. Machonkin, Liliana Quintanar, Amy E. Palmer, Richard Hassett, Scott Severance, Daniel J. Kosman, Edward I. Solomon
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 123, pp. 5507-5517, 2001
Authors: Ninian J. Blackburn, Martina Ralle, Richard Hassett, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 39, pp. 2316-2324, 2000
Authors: Richard HASSETT, David R. DIX, David J. EIDE, Daniel J. KOSMAN
Journal-article: Biochemical Journal, vol. 351, pp. 477-484, 2000
Authors: Richard HASSETT, David R. DIX, David J. EIDE, Daniel J. KOSMAN
Journal-article: Biochemical Journal, vol. 351, pp. 477, 2000
Authors: Atul Joshi, Mihaela Serpe, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 274, pp. 218-226, 1999
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman, Richard Hassett, Daniel S. Yuan, John McCracken
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 120, pp. 4037-4038, 1998
Authors: Richard F. Hassett, Annette M. Romeo, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 273, pp. 7628-7636, 1998
Authors: S A Knight, S Labbe, L F Kwon, D J Kosman, D J Thiele
Journal-article: Genes & Development, vol. 10, pp. 1917-1929, 1996
Authors: Richard Hassett, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 270, pp. 128-134, 1995
Authors: S A Knight, K T Tamai, D J Kosman, D J Thiele
Journal-article: Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 14, pp. 7792-7804, 1994
Authors: Jinhwa Lee, Natalie King, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, vol. 15, pp. 548, 1993
Authors: Bruce P. Branchaud, Michael P. Montague-Smith, Daniel J. Kosman, Frederick R. McLaren
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 115, pp. 798-800, 1993
Authors: C M Lin, B F Crawford, D J Kosman
Abstract: The cell association of copper in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can involve both binding to the cell wall and the accumulation of copper within the cell. The former process requires the concurrent generation of H2S by the cell via the reduction of sulphate. The contributions of each of these processes to the uptake of 64Cu by wild type and met3-containing (ATP sulphurylase-deficient) strains have been kinetically dissected. The Michaelis constant for uptake (4 microM) is independent of the type of cell association which is occurring, suggesting, although not requiring, that both processes are associated with a common kinetic intermediate. The time dependence of the cell-association of 64Cu also suggests the presence of this intermediate pool of bound copper. The Vmax for uptake includes a constant contribution from accumulation of 64Cu within the plasmalemma [0.1 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1] plus that fraction of the 64Cu within the intermediate pool which diffuses away and is trapped on the cell wall as a metal sulphide. This latter contribution to Vmax can be two- to three-times greater than the intracellular uptake depending on the amount and type of sulphur supplementation provided in the 64Cu2+ uptake buffer. Both processes are energy-dependent although the sulphide-dependent periplasmic accumulation is somewhat more sensitive to metabolic inhibition. This can be attributed to the ATP required for the activation of sulphate prior to its reduction to the level of sulphite and then sulphide. Periplasmic 64Cu accumulation is strongly inhibited by Zn2+ and Ni2+. This inhibition is due to competition for cell-generated sulphide; in the presence of 65Zn2+, the decrease in 64Cu bound is quantitatively related to the amount of 65Zn which becomes cell-associated. In contrast, intracellular 64Cu uptake is not inhibited by these two metals (at 50 microM) showing that the copper translocation pathway is metal-specific. These observations suggest a model for the way newly arrived copper is handled at the cell membrane and is partitioned for intracellular uptake.
PubMedId: 8371122
Journal-article: Journal of general microbiology, vol. 139, 1993
Authors: C M Lin, B F Crawford, D J Kosman
Abstract: The metabolism of copper in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied with respect to the distribution and stability to exchange of newly arrived 64Cu. Cells pre-incubated with 10 microM-Cu2+ accumulated 64Cu into two pools distinguishable by cellular locale and lability to exchange with extracellular cold copper. One pool was non-exchangeable and was localized to protoplasts. Size-exclusion chromatography of a soluble cell (protoplast) extract showed that this 64Cu was associated with up to four species. Two were identified as copper metallothionein and Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase based on comparisons of chromatograms derived from strains in which the genes for these two proteins had been deleted. A third species was identified as copper-glutathione based on chromatographic and biochemical assays. A second pool was exchangeable and was localized to the cell wall. In contrast to its rapid copper-stimulated exchange (t1/2 approximately 1 min), this pool exhibited only slow efflux (10% 64Cu loss per 60 min). Zn2+ did not stimulate the loss of 64Cu from this pool indicating that it was selective for copper. This pool was released into the supernatant upon protoplast formation and was found in the cell wall debris obtained when cells were mechanically disrupted. This 64Cu eluted in the void volume (peak Pv) of the column used to size-fractionate copper-binding species. The metal in Pv was exchangeable in vivo and in vitro. However, the corresponding chromatographic fraction obtained from copper-naive cells when labelled in vitro could bind less than 20% of the 64Cu bound to it in vivo indicating that the deposition of copper in this pool was primarily cell-dependent. In fact, this deposition was shown to be dependent on the cellular reduction of medium sulphate or sulphite to the level of sulphide, or on the addition of sulphide to the 64Cu uptake buffer. 64Cu in the non-exchangeable protoplast pool was not mobilized by cellular sulphide generation, indicating that cellular sulphide generation did not causally lead to the partitioning of 64Cu to the cell wall pool. The data indicate that the appearance of copper sulphide(s) on the cell wall in S. cerevisiae is gratuitous and does not represent a sulphide-based mechanism of copper resistance in this yeast.
PubMedId: 8371121
Journal-article: Journal of general microbiology, vol. 139, 1993
Authors: Jinhwa Lee, Annette Romeo, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, vol. 15, pp. 548, 1993
Authors: Edith Butler Gralla, Daniel J. Kosman
Book-chapter: Advances in Genetics, pp. 251-319, 1992
Authors: Z Hong, D J Kosman, A Thakur, D Rekosh, P T LoVerde
PubMedId: 1500173
Journal Article: Infection and immunity, vol. 60, 1992
Authors: E B Gralla, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 1456112
Journal Article: Advances in genetics, vol. 30, 1992
Authors: E C Chang, B F Crawford, Z Hong, T Bilinski, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 1999425
Journal Article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 266, 1991
Authors: M A Greco, D I Hrab, W Magner, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 2403543
Journal-article: Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 172, pp. 317-325, 1990
Authors: C M Lin, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 2188974
Journal Article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 265, 1990
Authors: E C Chang, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 2180907
Journal-article: Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 172, pp. 1840-1845, 1990
Authors: E C Chang, D J Kosman, G R Willsky
Journal-article: Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 171, pp. 6349-6352, 1989
Authors: E C Chang, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 2545701
Journal Article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 264, 1989
Authors: D J Kosman, J J Driscoll
PubMedId: 2841673
Journal Article: Progress in clinical and biological research, vol. 274, 1988
Authors: J. J. DRISCOLL, D. J. KOSMAN
Journal-article: ChemInform, vol. 18, 1987
Authors: DANIEL J. KOSMAN
Book-chapter: Structural and Resonance Techniques in Biological Research, pp. 89-244, 1984
Authors: Paul S. Tressel, Daniel J. Kosman
Book-chapter: Methods in Enzymology, pp. 163-171, 1982
Authors: B. Marwedel, L. Kwiatkowski, D. Melnyk, P. Tressel, R.D. Bereman, R.J. Kurland, M.J. Ettinger, D.J. Kosman
Book-chapter: Oxidases and Related Redox Systems, pp. 225-242, 1982
Authors: P S Tressel, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 6890617
Journal Article: Methods in enzymology, vol. 89 Pt D, 1982
Authors: Beverly J. Marwedel, Daniel J. Kosman, Robert D. Bereman, Robert J. Kurland
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 103, pp. 2842-2847, 1981
Authors: Laura D. Kwiatkowski, Martin Adelman, Russell Pennelly, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, vol. 14, pp. 209-222, 1981
Authors: L D Kwiatkowski, M Adelman, R Pennelly, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 7196436
Journal Article: Journal of inorganic biochemistry, vol. 14, 1981
Authors: Paul Tressel, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 92, pp. 781-786, 1980
Authors: Paul Tressel, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Analytical Biochemistry, vol. 105, pp. 150-153, 1980
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman, Jack Peisach, W. B. Mims
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 19, pp. 1304-1308, 1980
Authors: C S Jones, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 7440573
Journal Article: The Journal of biological chemistry, vol. 255, 1980
Authors: P Tressel, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 7192504
Journal Article: Analytical biochemistry, vol. 105, 1980
Authors: D J Kosman, J Peisach, W B Mims
PubMedId: 6248103
Journal Article: Biochemistry, vol. 19, 1980
Authors: P Tressel, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 7362603
Journal Article: Biochemical and biophysical research communications, vol. 92, 1980
Authors: Allan R. Shatzman, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol. 194, pp. 226-235, 1979
Authors: A R Shatzman, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 571694
Journal Article: Archives of biochemistry and biophysics, vol. 194, 1979
Authors: A R Shatzman, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 762015
Journal Article: Journal of bacteriology, vol. 137, 1979
Authors: R. D. BEREMAN, D. J. KOSMAN
Journal-article: Chemischer Informationsdienst, vol. 9, 1978
Authors: Allan R. Shatzman, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General Subjects, vol. 544, pp. 163-179, 1978
Authors: A R Shatzman, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 568946
Journal Article: Biochimica et biophysica acta, vol. 544, 1978
Authors: ROBERT D. BEREMAN, MURRAY J. ETTINGER, DANIEL J. KOSMAN, ROBERT J. KURLAND
Book-chapter: Advances in Chemistry, pp. 263-280, 1977
Authors: Ronald E. Weiner, Murray J. Ettinger, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 16, pp. 1602-1606, 1977
Authors: Robert D. Bereman, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 99, pp. 7322-7325, 1977
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman, Murray J. Ettinger, Robert D. Bereman, Ronald S. Giordano
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 16, pp. 1597-1601, 1977
Authors: Laura D. Kwiatkowski, Linda Siconolfi, Ronald E. Weiner, Ronald S. Giordano, Robert D. Bereman, Murray J. Ettinger, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol. 182, pp. 712-722, 1977
Authors: M.J. McDonald, Anna L. Tan-Wilson, Daniel J. Kosman, Alice Deyoung, Robert W. Noble
Journal-article: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Protein Structure, vol. 490, pp. 51-61, 1977
Authors: R D Bereman, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 199640
Journal Article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 99, 1977
Authors: L D Kwiatkowski, L Siconolfi, R E Weiner, R S Giordano, R D Bereman, M J Ettinger, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 20059
Journal Article: Archives of biochemistry and biophysics, vol. 182, 1977
Authors: R E Weiner, M J Ettinger, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 557987
Journal Article: Biochemistry, vol. 16, 1977
Authors: D J Kosman, M J Ettinger, R D Bereman, R S Giordano
PubMedId: 192267
Journal Article: Biochemistry, vol. 16, 1977
Authors: A R Shatzman, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 15985
Journal Article: Journal of bacteriology, vol. 130, 1977
Authors: M J McDonald, A L Tan-Wilson, D J Kosman, A Deyoung, R W Noble
PubMedId: 189824
Journal Article: Biochimica et biophysica acta, vol. 490, 1977
Authors: Beverly J. Marwedel, Robert J. Kurland, Daniel J. Kosman, Murray J. Ettinger
Journal-article: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 63, pp. 773-779, 1975
Authors: B J Marwedel, R J Kurland, D J Kosman, M J Ettinger
PubMedId: 1131263
Journal Article: Biochemical and biophysical research communications, vol. 63, 1975
Authors: Christopher S. Jones, Ramesh H. Shah, Daniel J. Kosman, Om P. Bahl
Journal-article: Carbohydrate Research, vol. 36, pp. 241-245, 1974
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman, Murray J. Ettinger, Ronald E. Weiner, Edward J. Massaro
Journal-article: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol. 165, pp. 456-467, 1974
Authors: RONALD S. GIORDANO, ROBERT D. BEREMAN, DANIEL J. KOSMAN, MURRAY J. ETTINGER
Journal-article: Chemischer Informationsdienst, vol. 5, pp. no-no, 1974
Authors: Murray J. Ettinger, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Biochemistry, vol. 13, pp. 1247-1251, 1974
Authors: Ronald S. Giordano, Robert D. Bereman, Daniel J. Kosman, Murray J. Ettinger
Journal-article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 96, pp. 1023-1026, 1974
Authors: D J Kosman, M J Ettinger, R E Weiner, E J Massaro
PubMedId: 4441089
Journal Article: Archives of biochemistry and biophysics, vol. 165, 1974
Authors: M J Ettinger, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 4360784
Journal Article: Biochemistry, vol. 13, 1974
Authors: R S Giordano, R D Bereman, D J Kosman, M J Ettinger
PubMedId: 4361301
Journal Article: Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 96, 1974
Authors: Laura D. Kwiatkowski, Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 53, pp. 715-721, 1973
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman, Robert D. Bereman, Murray J. Ettinger, Ronald S. Giordano
Journal-article: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 54, pp. 856-861, 1973
Authors: D J Kosman, R D Bereman, M J Ettinger, R S Giordano
PubMedId: 4356659
Journal Article: Biochemical and biophysical research communications, vol. 54, 1973
Authors: L D Kwiatkowski, D J Kosman
PubMedId: 4738713
Journal Article: Biochemical and biophysical research communications, vol. 53, 1973
Authors: Daniel J. Kosman
Journal-article: Journal of Molecular Biology, vol. 67, pp. 247-264, 1972
Authors: D J Kosman
PubMedId: 4339191
Journal Article: Journal of molecular biology, vol. 67, 1972
Presented by CUBS © 2022